Simple lightweight ebike

Nirmala

Active Member
The latest review on electricbikereport is for a nicely designed ebike system from the UK:
http://electricbikereport.com/arcc-e²-pod-moulton-electric-bike-review-a-british-classic/

It results in a lightweight bike. The Moulton model weighs 37.5 pounds total and the Cinelli based version from the same company weighs just 27.3 pounds (!) including battery and motor. These are low powered systems (250 watts) and also have small batteries (4AH), but the batteries are easy to swap in and out and they even sell a spare battery holder that attaches to the frame.

I am intrigued by the idea of a lightweight ebike that rides mostly like a normal bike with just a moderate amount of boost, and this seems to fit that description. In some ways, it is a more elegant design than the heavy 50-60 pound dedicated ebike with a large battery, especially if you enjoy pedaling and just want the electric boost for hills and headwinds, and maybe just a slight boost the rest of the time.

I am hoping that the ShareRoller I have pre-ordered allows me to accomplish something like this when added to a lighter weight standard bike, since the entire motor/battery/controller of the ShareRoller weighs only 5-8 pounds depending on battery size.

Here is the Moulton version:
arcc_assist_ebike_dsc_4010.jpg

And here is the 27 pound Cinelli city bike version:
L1040892 (3) Jan 15 resized.jpg
 
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Nirmala

Active Member
There are a few interesting features:

12 levels of assist selected by a knob on the controller
An inclinometer that can be set to autmatically boost output on hills
A system that boosts power for three seconds when starting from a standstill.
Standard Bosch power tool battery packs that are sturdy and cheap and have a two year warranty.
Custom machined parts and fork dropouts.
Manual controls through knobs right on the unit although you can use a bluetooth app and/or wireless controller instead.
 

twoxootrs

New Member
Thanks for posting the review for this interesting Moulton conversion. It's encouraging to see innovators conceiving ways to make motors work smarter while employing batteries that are not the most expensive part of the bike! Now they just need to license their technology to an interested party who can build a similar bike at a $1,000 price point.
 

Nirmala

Active Member
Thanks for posting the review for this interesting Moulton conversion. It's encouraging to see innovators conceiving ways to make motors work smarter while employing batteries that are not the most expensive part of the bike! Now they just need to license their technology to an interested party who can build a similar bike at a $1,000 price point.
Good point. These bikes are expensive, and even if they could offer a still lightweight $2000 bike with the technology, that would be great. Maybe the price will come down with licensing or just with volume if they do well.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
http://www.moultonbicycles.co.uk/features.html

Moulton seems to have three dealers in Arizona. This is a nice bike. Not a folder, but apparently it is modular. The reviewer said he used 9 wh per mile. That isn't very much, but it could provide hill climbing power. There are some nice technology touches, but I'm not sure how much they add. You might be able to add a motor to one of the more basic Moultons.
 

Nirmala

Active Member
http://www.moultonbicycles.co.uk/features.html

Moulton seems to have three dealers in Arizona. This is a nice bike. Not a folder, but apparently it is modular. The reviewer said he used 9 wh per mile. That isn't very much, but it could provide hill climbing power. There are some nice technology touches, but I'm not sure how much they add. You might be able to add a motor to one of the more basic Moultons.
I have been intrigued by the Moulton for years. It has supposedly set speed records in the UK even with the small wheels. The built in suspension supposedly makes the rolling resistance equal to or less than with a larger wheel, and of course the rotating weight and aerodynamic drag are much less.

I wish I could afford one, as I would love to try out the ShareRoller on a Moulton bike. A much more affordable alternative would be to try it on one of these full-suspension folders which weigh about as much as a Moulton, but are about 1/6 to 1/10 the cost:
http://www.downtube.com/Full-Suspension-Folding-Bike-p/9fs.htm
http://www.downtube.com/8FS-Full-Suspension-folding-bike-p/8fs.htm
 
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Nirmala

Active Member
Cool. Maybe @Yan Lyansky will someday offer his own electricified version of the Downtube bikes. His prices are very reasonable for what you get.

My interest in the Tannus solid tires has cooled off some. I did not like reading about how difficult they are to mount and dismount, which can be an especially big problem if you break a spoke or the like. And if I do like the ShareRoller on a regular bike, it will likely have front and rear quick release wheels, and no hub motor to deal with, so not as big a deal if there is a flat tire. I will be trying the ShareRoller on a Giant Cypress DX that my brother in law is giving me when he moves away. I may eventually buy some Marathon Plus tires for it to eliminate most flats, if that becomes my main bike.
 

Marty

Member
The latest review on electricbikereport is for a nicely designed ebike system from the UK:
http://electricbikereport.com/arcc-e²-pod-moulton-electric-bike-review-a-british-classic/

It results in a lightweight bike. The Moulton model weighs 37.5 pounds total and the Cinelli based version from the same company weighs just 27.3 pounds (!) including battery and motor. These are low powered systems (250 watts) and also have small batteries (4AH), but the batteries are easy to swap in and out and they even sell a spare battery holder that attaches to the frame.

I am intrigued by the idea of a lightweight ebike that rides mostly like a normal bike with just a moderate amount of boost, and this seems to fit that description. In some ways, it is a more elegant design than the heavy 50-60 pound dedicated ebike with a large battery, especially if you enjoy pedaling and just want the electric boost for hills and headwinds, and maybe just a slight boost the rest of the time.

I am hoping that the ShareRoller I have pre-ordered allows me to accomplish something like this when added to a lighter weight standard bike, since the entire motor/battery/controller of the ShareRoller weighs only 5-8 pounds depending on battery size.

Here is the Moulton version:
View attachment 5092

And here is the 27 pound Cinelli city bike version:
View attachment 5093
The latest review on electricbikereport is for a nicely designed ebike system from the UK:
http://electricbikereport.com/arcc-e²-pod-moulton-electric-bike-review-a-british-classic/

It results in a lightweight bike. The Moulton model weighs 37.5 pounds total and the Cinelli based version from the same company weighs just 27.3 pounds (!) including battery and motor. These are low powered systems (250 watts) and also have small batteries (4AH), but the batteries are easy to swap in and out and they even sell a spare battery holder that attaches to the frame.

I am intrigued by the idea of a lightweight ebike that rides mostly like a normal bike with just a moderate amount of boost, and this seems to fit that description. In some ways, it is a more elegant design than the heavy 50-60 pound dedicated ebike with a large battery, especially if you enjoy pedaling and just want the electric boost for hills and headwinds, and maybe just a slight boost the rest of the time.

I am hoping that the ShareRoller I have pre-ordered allows me to accomplish something like this when added to a lighter weight standard bike, since the entire motor/battery/controller of the ShareRoller weighs only 5-8 pounds depending on battery size.

Here is the Moulton version:
View attachment 5092

And here is the 27 pound Cinelli city bike version:
View attachment 5093

So I have to ask, have you seen my bikes?

250 and 350 watts, 20 mph, throttle and pedal assist, internal wiring, internal controller on the 250 watt bike, close to 30 pounds, a long range with a nice new type of battery. A quality bike for $999.

I'd put it up against the Cinelli city bike any time. I believe that is 15 mph max and pedal assist only, European standards.

Blue.jpg


green, black.png
 

Nirmala

Active Member
Your bikes look great...especially for the price. One question: your site says that the capacity is 175 pounds. Is that correct? You do not recommend your bikes for people over 175 pounds?

Unfortunately, a single speed bike would never work for me as it is very hilly around here. Will you be coming out with a multi speed version?

I like the colored tires and have always wondered why there are not more options when it comes to tire colors.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
$4200 for a 250watt 120Wh bike? Using a cordless drill battery.

Not sure this will galvanize ebike reputations.
 

Marty

Member
Your bikes look great...especially for the price. One question: your site says that the capacity is 175 pounds. Is that correct? You do not recommend your bikes for people over 175 pounds?

Unfortunately, a single speed bike would never work for me as it is very hilly around here. Will you be coming out with a multi speed version?

I like the colored tires and have always wondered why there are not more options when it comes to tire colors.

This is a fairly small light weight bike. It's very strong (Look closely at the frame) the frame manufacturer told me I could offer a 7 year warranty, Many heavier riders like it. There's a video below. It's not a bike for a 350 pound guy who does not want to pedal. It's for people who like to ride a bike.

This guy below was riding the 24 volt 180 watt test bike. One of my favorite bikes. That bike shows how much power you really need.

As to adding anything, the point is to be faithful to the style of a fixie bike, simplicity. That bike has nothing that is does not need. When you start adding things you have a bike just like many others. It's exactly like riding a fixie bike, the ones you see so many of out there.

You sit down to design the perfect bike it's a Stromer that weighs 30 pounds, there's a reason they weigh 62 pounds, it's impossible. And a 62 pound bike is a truck.

 
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Nirmala

Active Member
That all sounds good, but then why does your website say the weight limit is 175 pounds? That seems extremely low. Is it a liability issue? I am 6'0 and fairly thin, but I still weigh 185 pounds. And yet your website makes me think I would not be suited to your bikes.

And as far as the simplicity of your bike, I understand the appeal and purpose of such a bike. I can only say that for me personally it would never be a bike I was interested in as I really appreciate and constantly use the gears on my current bike. And I would have to question whether adding a rear cluster and derailleur to one of your bikes would mean that it would end up weighing 62 pounds like the Stromer, as you kind of suggest. That seems like a bit of hyperbole.

To each their own, and I sincerely hope you are successful with your bikes. They are great for what they offer and I am sure many people will appreciate what you are doing.
As I mentioned above, I am interested in exploring the experience of a lighter weight bike, even if it does not have the biggest motor or battery out there. I currently ride a 50 pound Magnum Ui5 with a 350 watt motor and 99% of the time, it has more than enough power. So I believe that your much lighter bikes would have plenty of power with either the 250 watt or 350 watt motors you offer. Again personally, I would just want to be able to shift gears. My 58 year old knees could not take powering up a hill on a fixie bike.
 
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Nirmala

Active Member
PPS: The FAQ on your website do not seem to work. I can't get several of the questions to open up on two of my browsers.
 

Marty

Member
PPS: The FAQ on your website do not seem to work. I can't get several of the questions to open up on two of my browsers.
Thank you

My web site was redesigned by a person much smarter than I am. I have had that same issue, and have had not been successful getting that changed.

If you click on FAQ instead of using the drop down menu, just click on it, the FAQs open. It makes sense to the guy who did it. I think it's confusing.

One of the ways web designers are smarter than those of us who use web sites. I plan to go back to doing my own web site.
 
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Marty

Member
That all sounds good, but then why does your website say the weight limit is 175 pounds? That seems extremely low. Is it a liability issue? I am 6'0 and fairly thin, but I still weigh 185 pounds. And yet your website makes me think I would not be suited to your bikes.

And as far as the simplicity of your bike, I understand the appeal and purpose of such a bike. I can only say that for me personally it would never be a bike I was interested in as I really appreciate and constantly use the gears on my current bike. And I would have to question whether adding a rear cluster and derailleur to one of your bikes would mean that it would end up weighing 62 pounds like the Stromer, as you kind of suggest. That seems like a bit of hyperbole.

To each their own, and I sincerely hope you are successful with your bikes. They are great for what they offer and I am sure many people will appreciate what you are doing.
As I mentioned above, I am interested in exploring the experience of a lighter weight bike, even if it does not have the biggest motor or battery out there. I currently ride a 50 pound Magnum Ui5 with a 350 watt motor and 99% of the time, it has more than enough power. So I believe that your much lighter bikes would have plenty of power with either the 250 watt or 350 watt motors you offer. Again personally, I would just want to be able to shift gears. My 58 year old knees could not take powering up a hill on a fixie bike.
Hi
That number is a guideline, not a limit. The new laws specify top speeds, and determines that speed with a 175 pound rider. Electric bikes are weight sensitive, you won't get the same performance as the weight goes up.

This is not a one size fits all bike, it's for a specific type of rider. If you want everything you will wind up with 62 pound bike. Or maybe a 90 pound bike.

As a French guy told me at Burning man, when you have a dead battery on an electric bike you just have a heavy bike to ride. These bikes ride as well as a non powered bike with the switch off. It's a bike for those who dislike heavy bikes.

You see many fixie bikes out there, and that is what this is. Many people ride them every day, with one single high gear. The hub motor makes that high single gear have a greater range of usefulness.

If you tried it, you just might like it.
 

Nirmala

Active Member
Hi
That number is a guideline, not a limit. The new laws specify top speeds, and determines that speed with a 175 pound rider. Electric bikes are weight sensitive, you won't get the same performance as the weight goes up.
Thanks. I understand now. I thought the 175 pounds was a top limit of some sort.

The point about what happens when the battery dies is a good reason to consider a lighter ebike.

And again, I do understand the appeal of the fixie bike, and also I get how the motor fills in the gaps. Similarly on my heavier bike with 7 gears, the gearing range would not be enough if there was no motor. But the motor by itself would not be enough for several of the hills around here also, and I do not want to power up those hills in a single middle of the road gear on a fixie bike. So for me, I will continue to only look at bikes with gears.

And I hear you about websites....they are like a high maintenance lover....always needing something :rolleyes:
 

Nirmala

Active Member
$4200 for a 250watt 120Wh bike? Using a cordless drill battery.

Not sure this will galvanize ebike reputations.
I hear you. But the Moulton by itself is a pretty expensive bike. Maybe this system will trickle down to some cheaper bikes over time.