Snow/ice/slush....still ride CC?

ebikes rock

New Member
Hey all,

I love my new CC! However, we are getting ice storms like every other week here in portland this year. Does anyone have experience riding on/through icy slush? ... Youth, where ya at buddy ;-)

I haven't tried it yet and wondering if I should leave the cross current at home on winter mix days. I have a pedal bike that I might take out in such lousy weather. My commute is 7 miles each way on flat roads. Thanks for any info!!!
 

youth

Active Member
Icy conditions with the CC are fine with carbide studded tires. With packed snow/slush tires need to be deflate to min pressures & still I have to be very cautious due to the wheels fishtailing (wobble). The 700x40 Schwalbe Marathon Winters I use aren't very good for snow though because the thread pattern isn't very aggressive nor deep. 40 may also be too small, but I don't really believe much in float until you get to fat bike tire sizes. I do get to store my bike inside at work & always make sure to wipe down the chain soon after because rust develops right away in such conditions. Slush will collect in the pulleys/rear derailleur/cassette & the lower part of the downtube unless you have mudguards that extend almost to the ground.
 

ebikes rock

New Member
Thanks youth! Very much appreciated!


QUOTE="youth, post: 94982, member: 1108"]Icy conditions with the CC are fine with carbide studded tires. With packed snow/slush tires need to be deflate to min pressures & still I have to be very cautious due to the wheels fishtailing (wobble). The 700x40 Schwalbe Marathon Winters I use aren't very good for snow though because the thread pattern isn't very aggressive nor deep. 40 may also be too small, but I don't really believe much in float until you get to fat bike tire sizes. I do get to store my bike inside at work & always make sure to wipe down the chain soon after because rust develops right away in such conditions. Slush will collect in the pulleys/rear derailleur/cassette & the lower part of the downtube unless you have mudguards that extend almost to the ground.[/QUOTE]
 

ebikes rock

New Member
Hey Lark,
yes- absolutely and unequivocally. I commute five days a week. I've ridden almost daily through the heavy winter rain in the Pacific NW. All wires, batteries, and motor components are sealed.

If it's frequently rainy, I would strongly suggest fenders. Fenders do an outstanding job of protecting any type of bike drive train against rain and slop.

**Just be sure to towel the bike off after each rainy trip. That is standard practice for ANY type of bike.
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
I would recommend water-proofing the electrical connectors with some dielectric grease (Dow Corning #4 is good stuff.) I recently took my connectors apart and noticed some corrosion on the five pin connector from the display. I don't do much riding in wet conditions.
 

lark

New Member
Hey Lark,
yes- absolutely and unequivocally. I commute five days a week. I've ridden almost daily through the heavy winter rain in the Pacific NW. All wires, batteries, and motor components are sealed.

If it's frequently rainy, I would strongly suggest fenders. Fenders do an outstanding job of protecting any type of bike drive train against rain and slop.

**Just be sure to towel the bike off after each rainy trip. That is standard practice for ANY type of bike.
Thanks ebr, that's very encouraging to know electronics are so well sealed. Yes, guess drivetrain could be a problem for me because, unlike my current bike I wouldn't be able or would at least be a lot more work to carry in up stairs to get inside and dry it out by heater. Outside is just unheated garage. Maybe one could get it up stairs if is possible to walk alongside and push real easy on throttle?

Have you found good fenders for this that are long enough in front to really protect chain? do you store inside? I'm also in Oregon though more rural. Man, this winter has been a beast, eh?
 

Contactchris

New Member
I have been using a product from the aviation industry called ACF-50. It's also widely used by the motor cycle community due to the salted wet roads. I use it on my ebike and it solves all the hard to deal with issues such as water, salt air, condensation, electricity, alloys and steel. It's safe on paint, plastic and rubber. Just avoid tyre and rotor surfaces. You won't be disappointed. See here. http://learchem.com/products/acf-50.html
 

ebikes rock

New Member
hey lark, yes I got fenders from my local bike store, made by Planet Bike. ***I just googled them and found they are called "Planet Bike Cascadia ATB Fenders." Cascadia is kinda hilariously appropriate. They feature 130mm mudflaps, and REALLY do a good job protecting the chain.

This is my first winter in PNW and I LOVE IT. Going skiing tomorrow because there's been like a foot of fresh snow since last week. Skiing into May and biking to work = my dream location.

Cheers!

Thanks for the ACF-50 suggestion ContactChris!