So much for Focus dealers

D

Deleted member 803

Guest
Just talked to my local bike shop and they told me that Focus requires a minimum purchase of 20 bikes to become a dealer. Given the price of their products coupled with the demand for e-bikes and I can't see any level headed bike dealer taking on the Focus brand. I would encourage them to rethink their dealer strategy. Wow.......
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Just talked to my local bike shop and they told me that Focus requires a minimum purchase of 20 bikes to become a dealer. Given the price of their products coupled with the demand for e-bikes and I can't see any level headed bike dealer taking on the Focus brand. I would encourage them to rethink their dealer strategy. Wow.......
That's really a shame, you've seemed really excited about the Focus. Every time I read about a Focus ebike it moves up on my list of bikes I consider for my next ebike. Not quite to the level of what you've got planned, but still... I've got a friend with a high end Focus road bike, so the quality I've seen up close. Focus makes some fine machines!

So what is your plan moving forward? For me I would need to travel some distance to even get to a bad ebike dealer, but I've got time. I have plans to purchase my second ebike this time next year. But aren't you in San Fran? I would be surprised to hear that you can't find a Focus dealer in your city.

Good luck @86 and still kicking
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
If you're buying bikes in that price range, can't you just take your private jet to the nearest city with a dealer, where ever in the world it is? :)
I assume you are talking about 86's plan... If I were to purchase a Focus today it would be the Focus Aventura Impulse 2.0, standard frame for 3800.00 USD. And I would likely have to travel to Long Island Electric Bikes to get one, a few hundred miles away. For some reason they don't sell many 4 grand ebikes amongst the Amish farms and Mail Pouch Tobacco barn signs where I live. Not quite to @86 and still kicking standard, but it gives me hope that when I grow up I may be able to afford a bike like he's got planned. That would give me 30+ years to plan for when (hopefully) I'm 86 and still kicking;)

Even at four grand it's twice what I paid for my current ebike, a ProdecoTech Phantom X3. Bikes have changed but prices haven't, I paid 750.00 for a road bike in 1988 and it was far from the most expensive bike available!

Well gotta go and warm up the da plane (for 86):D
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
The bike I am considering is scheduled to ship to dealers in late March or Early April. I will test ride the product. No decision is cast in stone. Only reason for this particular bike is that I love the idea of no chain or derailleur since I cannot bend down to clean or lube the chain. I also happen to like the Impulse mid drive a lot better than the Bosch mid-drive. Coming soon is a Shimano mid-drive so I am anxious to test that as well. I spent just a few years in the tech industry so I have a tendency to be a bleeding edge person. I also intend to ride the ST2. Early feedback is strong on this bike even though they have had some software issues in Europe. My body is dying but my mind and emotional state is that of a 13 year adolescent so I still get excited about new stuff.
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Just a point of clarification, not that it matters too much but the buy in is 10 bikes. Considering they have about 15 models with full size runs on each I don't think 10 bikes is an unreasonable commitment considering it could also be spread over a series of ship dates. I understand it could be difficult for a dealer just starting in the space but I guess that's not what they're looking for. Their strategy isn't much different than Specialized or Trek in the non-electric space.

I'm excited to hear about your next bike and how it works out for you.
 
Just talked to my local bike shop and they told me that Focus requires a minimum purchase of 20 bikes to become a dealer. Given the price of their products coupled with the demand for e-bikes and I can't see any level headed bike dealer taking on the Focus brand. I would encourage them to rethink their dealer strategy. Wow.......
Hi 86 and still kicking,

We love to hear how excited you are about the Aventura Impulse Speed!

We would like to reach out to this local dealer as they have been misinformed regarding the sales program. If you could, please send us their information on info@focus-bikes.com. I hope this helps clarify.

Warm Regards,
Focus Electric Bikes
 
F

FreedomBikes

Guest
I'm curious why there is such a difference in bike pricing for the Focus Thron Speed. $6199 on West Coast, $6199 on East Coast but $5097 in Bend, OR? How is that possible? If I were a Focus dealer I would be rather upset. Don't they have a MAP policy?
 
I'm curious why there is such a difference in bike pricing for the Focus Thron Speed. $6199 on West Coast, $6199 on East Coast but $5097 in Bend, OR? How is that possible? If I were a Focus dealer I would be rather upset. Don't they have a MAP policy?
Thank you for your inquiry. Consistent pricing is very important to us and Focus has MAP policies in place for all 2015 models. Those particular bikes you are referring to are 2014 Thron Speed models in which the MAP year has concluded. Dealers are now allowed to advertise those at a lower price.

- Focus Electric Bikes
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I'm curious why there is such a difference in bike pricing for the Focus Thron Speed. $6199 on West Coast, $6199 on East Coast but $5097 in Bend, OR? How is that possible? If I were a Focus dealer I would be rather upset. Don't they have a MAP policy?
A: Free Enterprise?

If I were a Focus customer I would be upset about the MAP policy. Not allowing a free market does not seem the best way to get your product on the map! ;)
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
Just curious, @stevenast , is your question based on a misunderstanding of pricing of older year model bikes vs. current year product? Minimum Advertised Price (MAP) allows all dealers, both brick & mortar stores & internet shops to have a level playing field for current year product. Undercutting MAP with a price war does not sell more product, it actually sells less. Ultimately, without brick and mortar IBDs around to provide service and explain the technology, particularly with more complex product like the Focus, you end up with a rapidly declining industry and a bunch of bikes needing maintenance with no place to go. So how do you pay for that? The training for an ebike mechanic costs time & money and special tools for the electronics as well as the standard costs for regular bike shop tools.
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
Just curious, @stevenast , is your question based on a misunderstanding of pricing of older year model bikes vs. current year product? Minimum Advertised Price (MAP) allows all dealers, both brick & mortar stores & internet shops to have a level playing field for current year product. Undercutting MAP with a price war does not sell more product, it actually sells less. Ultimately, without brick and mortar IBDs around to provide service and explain the technology, particularly with more complex product like the Focus, you end up with a rapidly declining industry and a bunch of bikes needing maintenance with no place to go. So how do you pay for that? The training for an ebike mechanic costs time & money and special tools for the electronics as well as the standard costs for regular bike shop tools.
MAP (minimum advertised price) was started years ago as a means of appeasing big box retailers from price cutting by smaller regional/local retailers. It refers to advertised price and has no legal standing with regards to what a dealer actually sells a product for. MAP was intended to provide an artificial stability to the value of a product to prevent margin erosion on key goods carried by the retailer. In decades of testing value propositions as they relate to purchase intent, no purchase factor has more influence on where a buyer spends their money than price: not service, not availability, and not warranty. The simple truth is that all successful dealers must learn to understand and use margin mix as a key tool for success. Nowhere is this example more prevalent than airline seat pricing. Bike dealers must learn to compete on all levels and this includes price. There are very few exceptions to this: Apple maintains retail price integrity through fear and intimidation. Apple dealers abide because demand usually outstrips supply. Ipad sales are declining and you can bet your booty that you will begin to see heavy discounting.

Any IBD/EBD that is not flexible on pricing will eventually go out of business. As a former employee of large public companies I can assure you that broad based distribution and price competition are very good for business. The creative dealer will figure out how to replace lost margin on loss leaders with unique products and services that a competitor can't or won't match.

For now there are very few e-bike dealers around the country. With such limited distribution, small dealers in larger metro areas can command full retail pricing. However, as markets mature and e-bikes begin to be sold on every street corner (so to speak), holding firm on retail pricing will lead to one conclusion: fewer sales.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
The training for an ebike mechanic
For example, I take my car to an independent repair shop. They do not making money by selling units, just by providing good service. Same model can easily fit the bike industry.

The level playing field you're talking about is basically a sytematic scheme to overcharge customers who aren't aggressive in their negotiating.
 
D

Deleted member 803

Guest
For example, I take my car to an independent repair shop. They do not making money by selling units, just by providing good service. Same model can easily fit the bike industry.

The level playing field you're talking about is basically a sytematic scheme to overcharge customers who aren't aggressive in their negotiating.
As a consumer the last thing I want is a level playing field. I have been amazed over the years how many consumers simply walk into a store and buy something at full retail. Most of the time, getting a better price is simply a matter of asking.