Specialized Turbo Creo 28mph Electric Road Bike

OzGreg

Member
How do you avoid shakes in the video? Some details please, just for curiosity.
The camera is a Shimano CM-2000 - its quite good but they were a bit of a market flop and they were being sold off very cheap ($AUD90) 2 years ago. It has stabilisation and a very good auto brightness control. Battery life is about as good as a GoPro. Its also fully waterproof and I've taken it snorkelling several times without problems. I had a GoPro3 and I think the CM-2000 is a lot better than that. I was thinking about a Hero7 for Christmas but just couldn't justify the extra cost to make boring bike videos :)
 
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OzGreg

Member
Last post on Creo range, I promise....

Just showing again that the 80mi (128km) range for just the internal battery advertised by Specialized is for me very conservative and in typical conditions I can go much further.
This is from a fairly average ride yesterday, although there was some headwind/tailwind. Settings are as usual, Sport selected with settings shown. Just using the internal battery.
Bike turned on at start of ride and nothing touched after that. I was riding with one other person, side by side all the way so no drafting at all.
On the graph below red is my heart rate and grey is my speed.
There was a slight headwind during the first part of the ride and you can see from the graphs below I was sticking close to the 27.5km/hr where the boost cuts out.
The middle part of the ride (from about 38km to 48km mark) has some hills (up to 20%) and then a tailwind home so frequently above the 27.5km/hr motor cutoff.

1578526879084.png

43766 43767 At 33km have used 13% battery

43768 At 40km with first climb, have used 20%

43769 End of second climb 33% battery usage

43771 At the coffee shop, used very little battery between 48km and 87 km due to tailwind.

Extrapolating these figures, on this type of ride I could expect something like 100/41 x 87 or just over 200km range.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
@OzGreg I hope you will continue your extremely interesting posting about you and Creo!
May we assume the long range of your Creo could be in part the result of your significant pedalling input?
 

Deacon Blues

Active Member
I wonder when they'll have a speed de-restrictor out for this motor. :p

I can live with the 32kph cut-off, here in Canada, but I'd be pissed with a 25kph limit. My Pedego RidgeRider cuts off at 40kph, which is just about spot on.
 

OzGreg

Member
@OzGreg I hope you will continue your extremely interesting posting about you and Creo!
May we assume the long range of your Creo could be in part the result of your significant pedalling input?
Due to the pedaling input and time above 27.5km/hr. You can see above that when I get into the hills the battery dropped by 13% in 8km!.
I want to keep fit and I'm very happy to put in the pedal input while I can. I just ride the Creo like I would ride any bike, but I'm getting the benefit I want which is much less wear and tear on my ageing body parts when climbing.
Its very interesting that as the terrain gets steeper the effort actually gets easier for me. I struggle to keep up on flat roads because of the boost cutout at 27.5km/hr but I can easily keep up with much stronger riders when the going gets hilly. And thats just using the 40% support setting. I think the bike would be fabulous in the USA with the 28 mph boost cutout but of course the downside would be very much reduced range.

I'll be taking this bike to Europe in June and I'm sure the range will be a big issue there as its all hills.
 

Captain Slow

Active Member
OzGreg, I really enjoy your posts about real world experience using the Creo. So please don't stop.

I'm still waiting for an aluminum version to be announced …………..
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Last post on Creo range, I promise....

Just showing again that the 80mi (128km) range for just the internal battery advertised by Specialized is for me very conservative and in typical conditions I can go much further.
This is from a fairly average ride yesterday, although there was some headwind/tailwind. Settings are as usual, Sport selected with settings shown. Just using the internal battery.
Bike turned on at start of ride and nothing touched after that. I was riding with one other person, side by side all the way so no drafting at all.
On the graph below red is my heart rate and grey is my speed.
There was a slight headwind during the first part of the ride and you can see from the graphs below I was sticking close to the 27.5km/hr where the boost cuts out.
The middle part of the ride (from about 38km to 48km mark) has some hills (up to 20%) and then a tailwind home so frequently above the 27.5km/hr motor cutoff.

View attachment 43772
View attachment 43766 View attachment 43767 At 33km have used 13% battery

View attachment 43768 At 40km with first climb, have used 20%

View attachment 43769 End of second climb 33% battery usage

View attachment 43771 At the coffee shop, used very little battery between 48km and 87 km due to tailwind.

Extrapolating these figures, on this type of ride I could expect something like 100/41 x 87 or just over 200km range.
It’s uselsss for a bike rider a 15.5mph speed. Most cyclists ride at 22mph average.
That will give Creo a 45-55mile range.

For the very few people who just ride at 12-18mph speeds , sure It can help.
 

rob_s

Member
I don't think the Creo is aimed at anyone who needs support riding flat or downhill.
The cutout is a pain on my Vado when you have a 65lb weight to push around but with the lightweight Creo I think it's actually a benefit for the support to cut out.
Here in Canada, the assist limit is 32km/h which I think is perfect. Riding flat or downhill with a light bike I can exceed that speed easily without any assistance.
When the headwinds blow or the road goes up then I need help and that's when the Creo will be there to assist.
I think people are way too hung up on the assist cutting out.
 

Solom01

Active Member
I agree 100% with rob. My only real issue with my US spec. Orbea Gain is that the cut out is too high at about 21 mph. I wish I could lower it to 15.5 so that it would only come on when absolutely needed. You could do that by powering it off but it would be easier to just have it automatically happen.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
You can see above that when I get into the hills the battery dropped by 13% in 8km!
The amount of potential energy that is to be overcome by the rider + motor to climb is often underestimated. You wrote Greg you negotiated over 1000 m rise on your group ride. If you were using (hypothetically) the throttle only, then it would be over 270 Wh necessary to just counter that 1000 m of rise for a 100 kg (rider + bike). Thanks to your substantial muscle input (and low speed) you are able to save the battery energy very much.

I can only follow your trips and am jealous! Don't stop writing!
 

Deacon Blues

Active Member
With the Gain and the Creo, if you're in the lowest level, do you have to go through the higher levels to turn the motor off, or can you just hit the "off" button?
 

OzGreg

Member
With the Gain and the Creo, if you're in the lowest level, do you have to go through the higher levels to turn the motor off, or can you just hit the "off" button?
I never turn the motor off on the Creo but if I wanted to it's done with a long press of the select button. A short push cycles through the three support levels and a long push turns support off or back on but leaves power on to the TCU electronics. If I turned it off completely by pressing the power button the bike is still rideable but the TCU stops sending speed cadence and power to my Garmin.
 

Brew

New Member
With the Gain and the Creo, if you're in the lowest level, do you have to go through the higher levels to turn the motor off, or can you just hit the "off" button?
With my Gain, Yes you have to go through the higher levels unless you want to turn it totally off, then you hold the button down for a couple seconds. It really doesn't take much to scroll through the two higher settings to get to the off setting.
 

Johnny

Active Member
Just saw the review. Thanks to @Court for this nice review.

This bike seems just perfect. I can't believe what I am saying but $6500 may even be considered cheap and there is nothing like this on the market. Only 31.5 pounds and for that it comes with stem suspension, 330wh battery and a quiet beautiful motor. Its main competitor is selling 250wh 20mph versions for more or a 52+lbs "carbon"(what is the point of carbon when it is this heavy and without a suspension!), flat bar non-suspension bike for a similar price.

If I had the opportunity I would get one for weekend rides.
 

Johnny

Active Member
It is only 1.5lbs lighter but it has 250wh battery vs 330wh (80 wh less), no stem suspension, Brose in Specialized is probably a nicer motor with 28mph cutoff instead of 20mph, no dropper seatpost(not necessary but I guess one can remove it to save weight), and almost 2 times the price. Trek has an advantage though, you can remove the battery and the motor and ride it as a nice road bike but then what is the point of an ebike...

I like Trek's offering but Specialized is the better bike even if Trek offered its version for the same price.
 

PaD

Well-Known Member
It is only 1.5lbs lighter but it has 250wh battery vs 330wh (80 wh less), no stem suspension, Brose in Specialized is probably a nicer motor with 28mph cutoff instead of 20mph, no dropper seatpost(not necessary but I guess one can remove it to save weight), and almost 2 times the price. Trek has an advantage though, you can remove the battery and the motor and ride it as a nice road bike but then what is the point of an ebike...

I like Trek's offering but Specialized is the better bike even if Trek offered its version for the same price.
It’s not a Brose motor in the Creo. Specialized says that they designed it but they also say it’s co-developed with a large German company in the automotive business.
Found that info in this article
I do like the nature of the Brose motor and Specialized software in my Vado so testing the Creo would be interesting I think.