Specialized Turbo Creo 28mph Electric Road Bike

Johnny

Active Member
It’s not a Brose motor in the Creo. Specialized says that they designed it but they also say it’s co-developed with a large German company in the automotive business.
Found that info in this article
I do like the nature of the Brose motor and Specialized software in my Vado so testing the Creo would be interesting I think.
Thank you for the correction, somehow I thought Specialized developed that motor with Brose.

Nonetheless, this is how it should be, if you are a big company and claim that you are designing an ebike from top to bottom you should at least customize the motor/battery to fit your design.
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Q- any pictures with the other color scheme- blue ?

Ty Court for great review. Is your fault for making us buying a few Creos soon 😉.

I also agree that it has a great price for what it offers. If it had the battery removable , it would have been perfect.

Full carbon frame e bike , 28mph , under 31lb also with rear rack capabilities for 6.5k sounds really good for a 2020start.

That 320wh with 2500ah cells battery can even be upgraded to 3500ah cells. Maybe 400wh ?
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Just saw the review. Thanks to @Court for this nice review.

This bike seems just perfect. I can't believe what I am saying but $6500 may even be considered cheap and there is nothing like this on the market. Only 31.5 pounds and for that it comes with stem suspension, 330wh battery and a quiet beautiful motor. Its main competitor is selling 250wh 20mph versions for more or a 52+lbs "carbon"(what is the point of carbon when it is this heavy and without a suspension!), flat bar non-suspension bike for a similar price.

If I had the opportunity I would get one for weekend rides.
Here is the quick summary of Court's Creo review... the video is nice for a more in-depth review. ;)

Summary
  • A lightweight gravel grinder road ebike with flared handlebars, wide treaded tires, a seat post dropper, and unique Future Shock 2.0 steer tube suspension. Available in six frame sizes, sold through a vast network of dealers with professional fitting systems, solid two-year comprehensive warranty. The frame offers provisions for two bottle cages, fenders, and a rear rack, wide range of color options
  • Boost hub spacing with sturdy 12mm thru-axles provide stiffness and control at higher speeds, sturdier spoke bracing angle, wheels won't go out of true as easily and both wheels offer quick release systems. Powerful fast-cooling 160mm hydraulic disc brakes using Shimano ICE-Tech rotors that dissipate heat from stainless steel rotors through aluminum alloy cores and air directing
  • One of the lightest yet most satisfying electric road bikes I've tested to date, the motor is surprisingly zippy and actually supports 28mph riding, the internal battery offers modest capacity but weighs under 4lbs. Additional Range Extender bottle-shaped batteries are easy to use and look great on the frame
  • Y-splitter cable to charge the main battery and bottle battery simultaneously costs extra, the Range Extender battery cable is not included when you buy the accessory, the bikes are fairly expensive in general and offer lower capacity battery sizes by default... and they're not removable (avoid leaving your bike in extreme heat), dropper post seems less useful than a suspension seat post here, no charging ports for aftermarket lights or the Mission Control smartphone app
 

OzGreg

Member
It is only 1.5lbs lighter but it has 250wh battery vs 330wh (80 wh less), no stem suspension, Brose in Specialized is probably a nicer motor with 28mph cutoff instead of 20mph, no dropper seatpost(not necessary but I guess one can remove it to save weight), and almost 2 times the price. Trek has an advantage though, you can remove the battery and the motor and ride it as a nice road bike but then what is the point of an ebike...

I like Trek's offering but Specialized is the better bike even if Trek offered its version for the same price.
The Fazua system has been around several years - it was one of the first road bike compatible systems. It has generally been well received but early versions were heavy (I think the Pinarello Nytro was 14.5 kg). I don't think it has a range extender option either. Its a personal thing, but I think bikes with the eBikemotion and Specialized systems are better looking as the power pack is less obvious.
 

Solom01

Active Member
Fantastic reviews Court! I had stopped even looking at the reviews because they all seemed to be about 50 pound and up bikes with fat tires and loaded to the gills with racks and other accouterments - great for leisurely rides and hauling stuff around but hardly sporty. It was cool to see Court enjoy the heady feeling of a quick and nimble bike. Hopefully the market will divide itself into bikes for people who love cycling and bikes for those looking for transportation/hauling. I definitely have to go try one of these. Not saying I can afford one until the aluminum version comes out but I expect that will be nice too. I wonder what these types of bikes will do to the more traditional expensive euro-bikes like R&M, Bull and so forth. It certainly makes them look out-of-date and clunky. It may not be a big deal in Europe with their 15.5 mph cut off but I would expect that this will draw many of the customers who would have spent 6k and up for some of the other brands.
 

darlingbastard

New Member
This style of bike makes a lot of sense in europe and fulfills a real need. Assist on hills and during acceleration with no extra weight penalty while cruising on manual power. It’s perfect for high speed commuting in countries with lower assist speeds. In the US you can just use a 70lb fat tire monster at 28mph so it’s more a personal preference towards a traditional bike feel that draws me to this bike.
 

Dude!

New Member
I am a long-time commuter with 2013 Specialized Turbo. My one way trip is 10.3 mile, so 20.6 mile in total and ignoring any workday errands. I work long days, leaving and returning in the dark, and often returning against afternoon diurnally driven sea breezes. I am a mountain biker. I am not a road biker. if I am going to pedal, I am going to get some adrenaline and while also bringing the dog to enjoy the forest and the redwoods. I commute because I believe in it and I hate sitting in traffic.

I have always commuted by bike in graduate school but tended to live within a 5 mile radius, which is ideal distance without needing assist. When we bought our house, it was farther than I wanted for commuting, but couldn't afford to pay the higher housing prices to live closer. I am a believer in the "pedal" electric assist when it first came out, I was an early adapter. I learned quickly that the Turbo was workhorse, so I add more weight to the bike - wooden fenders, Thule rack, pannier bags, my lunch bag, extra rear light light, dedicated lock. Its easily 60lbs. Its a beast but it works.

I have been demoing with the notion of buying a Specialized Creo Evo. I like the concept. At first, I was on the fence - the cost versus the value recognition. Now I love bikes, love tinkering with new bikes, like gadgets, live far enough away to appreciate using electric assist, see the value in electric assist, value commuting, and have an income to pay for this bike. I feel that I represent a very small segment of the population and if I am on the fence I am curious who else will buy this.

The question was am I a biker or commuter? This a conundrum. The Turbo is convenient.

The Creo is an awesome commuter. It is way more natural to ride and therefore fun. My speeds/time are almost the same but the experience is different and more enjoyable onboard the Creo. The Turbo promotes a different type of pedaling and response and because of this - you kind of ride it with less engagement. You are more along for the ride. With the Creo you are more integrated into the ride. You actually work harder on the Creo but in a more natural manner that supports pedaling harder. The Turbo gets up to speed quicker and uphills faster, but the Creo support pedaling faster when up to speed.

As I said, I am a mountain biker. I am testing a large (typically ride a medium) because we are going to switch the bars to flat bars. With flat bars, this bike is going to be a blast.

I need to get fenders for it, lights, and debating a dedicated pannier rack or whether to go back to just using a backpack.

The Turbo was always cumbersome bringing up to my office and when running errands. Furthermore, when I bring truck for service, lifting the Turbo onto the tailgate, requires a few seconds preparation before lifting. The Creo - just throw it over the tailgate.

More to follow, but I am convert!
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
With a monthly payment of 7-800$ for 10-12 months the Creo is attainable.
Is the Ultimate Toy.

I hope M. Snyder of Specialized gifted you one , the review is outstanding and w/o a doubt will have many people purchase it.
Hopefully they will pay attention to your input regarding the minor issues and for 2021 have it updated.

Q- Did Court said that it can only shift one gear at a time ??
I don't have time to go now through the review again but i clearly heard him saying that.

Why is that and is it for all Creo models ?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I wonder if the speed assistance limit for Creo really is 28 mph in all models or it is country region specific. How it is @Dude! with your Creo? How it is with your Creo in Australia @OzGreg? Specialized.com pages are silent about that.
 

Dude!

New Member
I wonder if the speed assistance limit for Creo really is 28 mph in all models or it is country region specific. How it is @Dude! with your Creo? How it is with your Creo in Australia @OzGreg? Specialized.com pages are silent about that.
On the Turbo, when I go past 28MPH, it stops and feels like I am towing a boat. With the Creo (that has 28PMH assist), I exceed 28MPH and its fine. I am actually hitting higher MPH with the Creo. I want a bigger chain ring. I am often spinning out on the declines. I have a few hills on my commute. The Creo feels best on the flats or slight inclines, as the gearing feels appropriate. I am not using the full range. Note that I am a masher not a spinner. I am also pedaling in flat pedals (no clips). I am also in street clothes, jacket, etc. I am not aerodynamic by any means! I am in the US, live and commute near Monterey California.
 

Captain Slow

Active Member
Dude! I am planning on buying an aluminum Creo when they become available.

Looking at the Creo the clearance on the chainring looks pretty tight. Doesn't look like there's room to fit a larger chainring. I would love to throw a 48 or 50 on there in place of the 46. With the cassette having a 42T I think a low gear of 50/42 would be fine. That's a lower gear than 34/28 and you have a motor to help you up the hill, a 46/42 seems way too low a gear. I mean how fast are you going when you're spinning such a small gear?
 

PaD

Well-Known Member
I wonder if the speed assistance limit for Creo really is 28 mph in all models or it is country region specific. How it is @Dude! with your Creo? How it is with your Creo in Australia @OzGreg? Specialized.com pages are silent about that.
No it's 28 : But with 120 Cadence support you can get up past 28 peddling hard
I’d say that it’s 25km/h ( 15.5mph) in Australia. OzGreg says in an early post in this thread that power is cut off at 27.5km/h.
Creos sold in Sweden will have the 25km/h limit too. Could be more like 27.5km/h as there seems to be an acceptance for 10%+
My LBS has a Comp Evo in my size as a demo. It’s also possible to rent the bike for a full day. I’d like to do that.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
In the US, the class 3 limit is 28MPH which this is.
Specialized do not specify what Class it is, do they?
(Europe requires specific gear such as lights, horn, mirror, number plate, etc on a speed bike so I wonder).

I’d say that it’s 25km/h ( 15.5mph) in Australia. OzGreg says in an early post in this thread that power is cut off at 27.5km/h.
Creos sold in Sweden will have the 25km/h limit too. Could be more like 27.5km/h as there seems to be an acceptance for 10%+
My LBS has a Comp Evo in my size as a demo. It’s also possible to rent the bike for a full day. I’d like to do that.
Please do that. It is a pity, isn't it.
 

Dude!

New Member
Specialized do not specify what Class it is, do they?
(Europe requires specific gear such as lights, horn, mirror etc on a speed bike so I wonder).
For the US, they are defined by Class. Class 1 (assist) - mountain bike, limited to 20MPH, Class 3 (assist) - road bike limited to 28MPH. there are other classes from non-assist, but don't know those offhand. I just checked and mine has a sticker that states class 3.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
Hey, if you can afford it, and get value out of it, why not? I wonder if the Evo version would be worth considering for you. Presumably tougher tires, and maybe those flared bars might be good enough that you don’t have to put a flat bar on it and change the shifter. Closer to your preferred type of riding.

I think Specialized has hit it out of the park with this bike, or will once the aluminum and less expensive versions hit. Anyway, looking forward to your impressions of it however you go.

As an original Turbo owner, you know what a hot ticket that was when it came out. Looks like they’ve done it again.