Specialized Turbo Creo 28mph Electric Road Bike

Raf49

New Member
Region
Europe
I think I'm going to buy the Comp Carbon, because I don't need Di2. Accepting the good idea of Jodi2, I will put some elements of the Expert: the Roval C38 carbon wheels and the Shimano XT cassette. I will put aside the original Carbon Comp wheels and cassette which can later be used for gravel. I have a question: I guess Roval C38 wheels will already come with brake discs. Will they be compatible with the Comp Carbon brakes? Thank you for your answers.
 

Rincon

Well-Known Member
I guess Roval C38 wheels will already come with brake discs. Will they be compatible with the Comp Carbon brakes?
Roval wheels are built to order. Have them built with the same discs as the Carbon Comp. You’re good to go.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
replaced my quick release axles with standard ones, these robert axle parts are an exact match except for not having the lever. nice fit, cleaner look, and i never take the wheels off except for maintenance. also saved 59 grams. 😂😂

no - that wasn’t my primary motivation!

254C3814-6496-4022-A449-2D3D84033B92.jpeg
 

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reed scott

Well-Known Member
replaced my quick release axles with standard ones, these robert axle parts are an exact match except for not having the lever. nice fit, cleaner look, and i never take the wheels off except for maintenance. also saved 59 grams. 😂😂

no - that wasn’t my primary motivation!

View attachment 90145
Love Robert Axle Project. They are THE go to guys to get you set up for an axle attached trailer hitch as well. 👍
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
also got this awesome weight weenie one piece carbon cage, matches the finish on the bike nicely :)

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jodi2

Active Member
I put to (cheap) carbon cages in September, one lasted three weeks, the other one surely will also not reach one year of life time. Then I'll be back to simple heavy but reliable plastic cages.
 
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Raf49

New Member
Region
Europe
Good Morning. I have a Specialized Turbo Creo Expert. I need a support base for the fork to be able to transport the bike standing up inside the car (Renault Scenic minivan) with the front wheel removed.
On the web I don't find 12x110 Boost supports, but 12x100, 15x110 and others.
Can you give me a solution?
Thanks
Raphael
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
Good Morning. I have a Specialized Turbo Creo Expert. I need a support base for the fork to be able to transport the bike standing up inside the car (Renault Scenic minivan) with the front wheel removed.
On the web I don't find 12x110 Boost supports, but 12x100, 15x110 and others.
Can you give me a solution?
Thanks
Raphael
Hi Raphael, I’ve gone through the same search the past couple of weeks and returned zilch except in the case that you buy a Thule rooftop fork mount rack (the latest) which comes with the adapters. However it was quite easy to find aluminum tubing with 15mm OD and 12mm ID which could then be cut to 110mm -> fork inside width and fit inside of a 15mm fork mount. 12x110 is very new to the rack and mount world it seems.

Here’s the parts I was looking to order:


plus


I didn’t go with the fork mount rack actually, bc I found a complete BMW rack instead which I will try.

Also if you feel the need to secure the 12mm tube inside the 15mm I recommend a cyanoacrylate adhesive (SuperGlue) as you can easily unbond it later with acetone.
 
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Raf49

New Member
Region
Europe
Hi, Voltman99. A very good idea to use a 15mm outer and 12mm inner tube to place on a 15x110 stand. I will do it.
At the moment, as I need to carry two bikes in the car on Monday, I have used a 104x80x40 wooden block to which I have made a 12 mm hole along the block. I have fixed the block to a wooden base 110 cm long, almost as long as the width of the trunk. This way I can carry 2 bikes. Initially I cut the block at 110mm, but it wouldn't fit and I had to lower it to 104mm. It works well. If anyone can use this solution, I would be delighted.
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
Initially I cut the block at 110mm, but it wouldn't fit and I had to lower it to 104mm.
It may very well be the case that fork spacing is 104mm and bolt shaft length is 110mm - I’m still hypothetical at this point because my bike is yet to be delivered. Either way you’d have to cut the 15mmx12mm tubing to that length to make a bushing. Honestly though the wood block is a fantastically simple and good idea if it’s traveling inside the van. No need to fix if it ain’t broke. My application was rooftop where I needed close tolerances and a snug fit to prevent damage from wind resonance and vibrations.
 

Raf49

New Member
Region
Europe
The space between the dropouts, in the place of the thru-axle is 110 mm but in my solution in wood, as the arms are narrowing, it is necessary to cut the wood to 104 mm. The height of the block, better than 80.5 mm so that the crank turns completely.
 

Prairie Dog

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Red Deer
Good Morning. I have a Specialized Turbo Creo Expert. I need a support base for the fork to be able to transport the bike standing up inside the car (Renault Scenic minivan) with the front wheel removed.
On the web I don't find 12x110 Boost supports, but 12x100, 15x110 and others.
Can you give me a solution?
Thanks
Raphael
I use a pair of Rockymount Hot Rods to secure our Creos in the back of our Volvo and purchased composite wall panel tracks and locally sourced hardware to fabricate this compact and ultralight in-car bike rack. The length and ID of the aluminum sleeves is 15 x 110mm but once the thru axle is tightened down in place the bikes ride solidly without moving. I’ve employed this system for over a year now without any issues. Although not absolutely necessary, I also tie down the bikes using the vehicle's cargo tether points. The rear wheels are also cinched down on DIY wheel trays made from excess material that I cut from the track panels.

https://rockymounts.com/products/hotrod.html

https://www.gladiatorgarageworks.ca/collections/wall-organization
IMG_20210530_1847348.jpgIMG_20200909_2240222.jpg
 

Raf49

New Member
Region
Europe
Here are some pictures
 

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pbd87

New Member
Region
USA
Anyone been through the process of trying to lower the Q factor on the Creo? Not seeing any options outside of the pedals and cleats. The aluminum and carbon cranks both have the same 182mm Q factor, according to Praxis. Anyone found any other options?
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Anyone been through the process of trying to lower the Q factor on the Creo? Not seeing any options outside of the pedals and cleats. The aluminum and carbon cranks both have the same 182mm Q factor, according to Praxis. Anyone found any other options?
How would you do that? Thinner cranks? Or some method of reducing the separation of the pedals and cranks. Would that create problems of the inside of the foot/shoe hitting the cranks?

Does a larger Q factor create additional stresses on the knees or other joints?
 

pbd87

New Member
Region
USA
How would you do that? Thinner cranks? Or some method of reducing the separation of the pedals and cranks. Would that create problems of the inside of the foot/shoe hitting the cranks?

Does a larger Q factor create additional stresses on the knees or other joints?
Q too high can cause issues for some people. Too narrow can cause issues for other people as well, of course, but that's not a problem that Creo is going to cause, since it's very wide. Your feet, knees, and hips should all be aligned. Any angle to that system adds stress and increases the risk of repetitive stress injury.

For me, the Creo is giving me a little knee trouble. Not terrible, but a little annoying, and I don't want it to get worse. After going through everything with my bike fitter, everything is great, except the Q is clearly too wide. I'm going to switch pedals to one with a smaller cleat, so that I can slide the cleat farther outward on my shoe, effectively bringing my foot inwards relative to the bike. I'm also going to look at getting a pedal with a little bit shorter spindle at the same time, since I'm buying new anyway. There is currently room between my foot and the crank arm, so I'm going to minimize that as far as I can, and hope it's enough.

Ideally, there would be some option with a lower-profile or thinner crank, but I haven't found any such option for the Creo. I was hoping maybe there was some option out there that I've missed.
 

Vamos

New Member
Region
USA
Q factor is pretty much fixed by the bike geometry, esp if the crank arms and crank axle can‘t be changed. Changing pedals and moving cleats will change the stance distance at the risk of your heels rubbing on the crank arms.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Q factor is pretty much fixed by the bike geometry, esp if the crank arms and crank axle can‘t be changed. Changing pedals and moving cleats will change the stance distance at the risk of your heels rubbing on the crank arms.
i moved my cleats outward (thus moving my feet inward), wondering if narrowing the Q would be good given that it’s so wide. just created a lot of rubbing on the cranks. my bike fitter chuckled and moved them back.