Specialized Turbo Vado/Como User Club

BarryS

Active Member
WOW 2nd real ride on My New Vado 4 : Factory Settings : I haven't even read the Owners manual yet : On a short 20 Mile Ride on Graveled country Blacktop Surface . Which creates extra drag < In just Eco mode I had no issues maintaining 20-21MPH for the majority of the ride, without excreting Myself : Lots of Straight Ways Curves and roller Coaster Hills : I'm impressed as Country Blacktop is much more tiring to ride then Smooth Bike path blacktop or Concrete :
The only Drawback I see is getting enough exercise : To really get winded I had to get aggressive and climb to 28 Miles per hour in ECO with one cog to spare. Naturally I couldn't maintain that long :

I'm not sure what the grade is on the hills I climbed > They weren't super steep > On a regular bike I'm peddling pretty hard to get up them. With The Vado I hardly noticed much difference in effort : Although I lost a Few MPH in Speed.

Actually owning The Bike Sheds light on why most say they rarely use Turbo. Going 28 MPH for short clips is fun > It does get windy Though > I had to flip My ball cap backwards to keep it from flying off . It seems 19-20MPH is a nice cruising speed : You cover alot of group fast and the wind in your face is manageable >

Looking forward to riding the East to West trail we sometimes use : It's always a lot of wind to deal with> It's basically flat but wide open and windy : The Most grueling path we ride because of the wind . Realistically I can tell I'm either going to have to push my speed or increase distance to get the same workout as before the Vado :)

I'm guessing ever changing conditions will throw in some variables I've not encounter yet. WHAT A BLAST
 

PaD

Well-Known Member
WOW 2nd real ride on My New Vado 4 : Factory Settings : I haven't even read the Owners manual yet : On a short 20 Mile Ride on Graveled country Blacktop Surface . Which creates extra drag < In just Eco mode I had no issues maintaining 20-21MPH for the majority of the ride, without excreting Myself : Lots of Straight Ways Curves and roller Coaster Hills : I'm impressed as Country Blacktop is much more tiring to ride then Smooth Bike path blacktop or Concrete :
The only Drawback I see is getting enough exercise : To really get winded I had to get aggressive and climb to 28 Miles per hour in ECO with one cog to spare. Naturally I couldn't maintain that long :

I'm not sure what the grade is on the hills I climbed > They weren't super steep > On a regular bike I'm peddling pretty hard to get up them. With The Vado I hardly noticed much difference in effort : Although I lost a Few MPH in Speed.

Actually owning The Bike Sheds light on why most say they rarely use Turbo. Going 28 MPH for short clips is fun > It does get windy Though > I had to flip My ball cap backwards to keep it from flying off . It seems 19-20MPH is a nice cruising speed : You cover alot of group fast and the wind in your face is manageable >

Looking forward to riding the East to West trail we sometimes use : It's always a lot of wind to deal with> It's basically flat but wide open and windy : The Most grueling path we ride because of the wind . Realistically I can tell I'm either going to have to push my speed or increase distance to get the same workout as before the Vado :)

I'm guessing ever changing conditions will throw in some variables I've not encounter yet. WHAT A BLAST
No problem to get some workout. Just install the Mission Control app on your smartphone and lower the support and peak power setting in Eco Mode.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Yep. Once you get the ebike grin off your face go tell mission control you want to use all but 10 percent of battery.Just a grin no working out. 😁
 

Yogajohn

New Member
To get exercise you just have to change your expectations...instead of getting up a hill at all, going up the hill at 20 mph. Or, instead of getting to where your going in 45 minutes without any effort, get there in 35 minutes. That's me on my commute, challenging myself to get a workout, and I definitely get a workout. Have fun...get used to smiling. :)
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
(not to you specifically, but your comment reminded me of an item on my to-do list...)

Anybody have a suggested list of tools to be able to change tubes on the road? I'd like to put together a tool kit for common repairs (quick link for chain, etc). Also, can anybody link to what size spare tube?

Tools and tube will live in my pannier.
Your spare tube should match your tire size printed on the tire sidewall. Comos & Vados have different size tires, so different tubes.

My flat kit includes a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, mini-pump, CO2 inflator with 16g cartridges (1-1/2 cartridges per tire fill), and a cleanup wipe. I also carry a mini-tool which has the hex wrench necessary to remove the Como/Vado through axles for a flat repair. I put talc on all my tubes and store them in zip locks to minimize deterioration.

I've never had a chain fail on a ride so I don't carry a master link on day rides. I do carry more 'stuff' for out of the area rides.

My younger sons have been avid MTBrs since high school so I ended up with a fully equipped home bike shop. I'm probably not the best person to advise on what other tools to get 'cause my answer is usually all of these;
Shop_Tools_wall.jpg

There's also a tool chest with smaller tools on the workbench opposite the pegboard, an air compressor on the floor to the right, and a wall-mounted bike stand to the right about a bike length away.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Your spare tube should match your tire size printed on the tire sidewall. Comos & Vados have different size tires, so different tubes.

My flat kit includes a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, mini-pump, CO2 inflator with 16g cartridges (1-1/2 cartridges per tire fill), and a cleanup wipe. I also carry a mini-tool which has the hex wrench necessary to remove the Como/Vado through axles for a flat repair. I put talc on all my tubes and store them in zip locks to minimize deterioration.

I've never had a chain fail on a ride so I don't carry a master link on day rides. I do carry more 'stuff' for out of the area rides.

My younger sons have been avid MTBrs since high school so I ended up with a fully equipped home bike shop. I'm probably not the best person to advise on what other tools to get 'cause my answer is usually all of these;
View attachment 65378
There's also a tool chest with smaller tools on the workbench opposite the pegboard, an air compressor on the floor to the right, and a wall-mounted bike stand to the right about a bike length away.

Well done!
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Your spare tube should match your tire size printed on the tire sidewall. Comos & Vados have different size tires, so different tubes.

My flat kit includes a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, mini-pump, CO2 inflator with 16g cartridges (1-1/2 cartridges per tire fill), and a cleanup wipe. I also carry a mini-tool which has the hex wrench necessary to remove the Como/Vado through axles for a flat repair. I put talc on all my tubes and store them in zip locks to minimize deterioration.

I've never had a chain fail on a ride so I don't carry a master link on day rides. I do carry more 'stuff' for out of the area rides.

My younger sons have been avid MTBrs since high school so I ended up with a fully equipped home bike shop. I'm probably not the best person to advise on what other tools to get 'cause my answer is usually all of these;
View attachment 65378
There's also a tool chest with smaller tools on the workbench opposite the pegboard, an air compressor on the floor to the right, and a wall-mounted bike stand to the right about a bike length away.
@Sierratim remember TMI ? That's TMT ...Too Many Tools ... :oops:
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to pick between getting a Vado, Como or Vado SL.
Choose:
  1. Como, if you prefer the comfort of Rolls-Royce;
  2. Vado, if Ferrari is what you like;
  3. Vado SL if you are a healthy person, need exercise, and would like to be able to carry the bike in your hands if you need (I'm serious here).
I'm a Ferrari fan :)
 

citivas

Member
Choose:
  1. Como, if you prefer the comfort of Rolls-Royce;
  2. Vado, if Ferrari is what you like;
  3. Vado SL if you are a healthy person, need exercise, and would like to be able to carry the bike in your hands if you need (I'm serious here).
I'm a Ferrari fan :)

What makes the Vado a Ferrari versus the Como exactly? To extend the metaphor, in this case the Rolls-Royce has the same engine as the Ferrari, and is a little lighter which helps output and range. It has most of the same major components -- brakes, gears, etc. It basically seems to come down to tires and rider orientation, right?
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
According to what Como owners say, that e-bike is just very comfy. As I own a Vado, I can only say it is a very sporty e-bike. (I had to rise the handlebars a little though for more comfort).
P.S. All my e-bikes are fast. Only the Vado gives the feeling of being a sports e-bike, good for zooming around...
 

abpdx

New Member
Help me decide! I’m torn between the Vado 3.0 and the 4.0. I can’t find a 4.0 in stock anywhere. I am concerned that the 3.0 being a class 1 will get annoying when the motor tops helping, but tbh I don’t often go above 20 mph actually peddling..more like just hitting that speed on the downhills. Any thought on range of the 460wh battery, hitting the 20mph “wall” and the lower specs on the components?
 

BarryS

Active Member
And wear a helmet...
I have a helmet because My Brotehr-in-law works where I was able to get a steal on an Parachute Otherwise Helmets are way way way over-priced for what you get vs Motorcycle helmets
Help me decide! I’m torn between the Vado 3.0 and the 4.0. I can’t find a 4.0 in stock anywhere. I am concerned that the 3.0 being a class 1 will get annoying when the motor tops helping, but tbh I don’t often go above 20 mph actually peddling..more like just hitting that speed on the downhills. Any thought on range of the 460wh battery, hitting the 20mph “wall” and the lower specs on the components?
Vado 4 I would wait to long I see they have raised prices on teh website :
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Any thought on range of the 460wh battery, hitting the 20mph “wall” and the lower specs on the components?
Perhaps it is better to wait for the 2021 models? I can tell you nothing is wrong with Class 1 but the 460 Wh battery is really limiting. You would also like to have thru-axles, better brakes, etc., etc.

I have a helmet because My Brotehr-in-law works where I was able to get a steal on an Parachute Otherwise Helmets are way way way over-priced for what you get vs Motorcycle helmets
I can remember the only day I rode out helmet-less and had a bad fall at high speed. Not anymore! Always helmeted rides!
 

citivas

Member
Help me decide! I’m torn between the Vado 3.0 and the 4.0. I can’t find a 4.0 in stock anywhere. I am concerned that the 3.0 being a class 1 will get annoying when the motor tops helping, but tbh I don’t often go above 20 mph actually peddling..more like just hitting that speed on the downhills. Any thought on range of the 460wh battery, hitting the 20mph “wall” and the lower specs on the components?

The Vado 3.0 is class 3. I saw the sticker myself on the one I test rode, the LBS tech said it and its in a bunch of the reviews.
 

citivas

Member
Perhaps it is better to wait for the 2021 models? I can tell you nothing is wrong with Class 1 but the 460 Wh battery is really limiting. You would also like to have thru-axles, better brakes, etc., etc.


I can remember the only day I rode out helmet-less and had a bad fall at high speed. Not anymore! Always helmeted rides!

2021 Vado 3.0 is already in stores. The L is actually the only Vado right now that's not out of stock on Specialized website online too. It is Class 3 and still has the 1.2e motor and 460Wh battery.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
What makes the Vado a Ferrari versus the Como exactly? To extend the metaphor, in this case the Rolls-Royce has the same engine as the Ferrari, and is a little lighter which helps output and range. It has most of the same major components -- brakes, gears, etc. It basically seems to come down to tires and rider orientation, right?
Diferent chainring that gives more torque in the Vado, along with a geometry that is made to standup on pedals easily makes Vado a better climber. Long fixed fork angle with soft tires and cushy seat and grips makes Como a better crusier. Maybe. :D