Specialized Turbo Vado SL: An Incredible E-Bike (User Club)

Rincon

Well-Known Member
Rincon, please listen to me.
There are two figures:
  • 16400
  • 21500
I'm not sure what you're talking about. Is that in Euros? A Polish currency? Are those prices for the Vado SL 4.0 vs Vado SL 5.0? That's not the US price, which is less than 1/3 of those numbers. I bought the Vado SL 5.0 because I wanted the features, I can afford it, and I think it's a good value. We are free to disagree here. Buy whatever suits you. I'm not being snarky. Everyone needs to make their own decisions. I respect whatever decision you made for yourself.

The Vado SL 5.0 lists for US$4,750. The Vado SL 4.0 EQ lists for US$3,750.

Assuming those are Vado prices in zloty, I see that Vado 5.0's US$4,750 converts to 18,426 Polish zloty. So you're certainly paying a premium for either of the bikes.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Rincon,

I'm not in dispute with you :) And it does not matter what currency I quoted.

Now:
SL 4.0 EQ is PLN16,400, which is USD4,230 (EUR3,580) compared to the US price of USD3,750. (German price is EUR3,500).
SL 5.0 EQ is PLN21,500, which is USD5,550 (EUR4,700) compared to the US price of USD4,750. (German price is EUR4,600).

As you can see, the European prices are far higher than they are in the U.S. I could attribute them to the VAT but even that does not match, as the Polish VAT is 23%, and the German tax is 25% (besides, what is your local sales tax?)

Anyway, it is not the matter of how many % is the 5.0 more expensive than 4.0 but the dollar difference, which is US$1,000 in your country and US$1320 for Poland.

What I paid for extras was:
  • Range Extender + RE Cable + RE Y-Charger Cable + 2 water-bottle cages + TCD: USD615
  • Redshift ShockStop Stem: US$190
  • Redshift ShockStop Seatpost: US$275
Total: US$1,080

For the price difference between 5.0 and 4.0, I was able to buy the full suspension as well as everything related to the Range Extender. And that was my aware decision because I could well afford 5.0 if I were convinced I would have got a better bang for the buck with it. To be very honest, the thing that discouraged me the most with the 5.0 was the carbon fork. I don't need it, and in case I rode into the forest and the CF fork broke, Specialized would certainly say: "We clearly define VSL 5.0 is to be ridden on roads only, and we cannot honour your warranty in case of crash" :D I'm sure Rincon you know what Ye Goode Ole Specialized stands for :)

Yet I'm not saying your decision was wrong. I only say I found another way.
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
I'm not going to have to worry about this for a while, and it probably doesn't apply to places with stricter regulations (e.g. Europe), but has anyone looked into the possibility of installing an inline switch of some sort to be able to turn the headlight off and on? The taillight isn't a concern and besides when I replace the seat post it will have to go (I have other taillight options). But I really want to turn off the headlight when I'm just riding on trails and pathways, which is 90% of my riding around here.

(Please don't reply telling me why I shouldn't do this, safety, visibility, yada, yada, yada. Just assume that, at 75 and 70 years experience, I know what I'm doing. ;) )
Shouldn’t be an issue since the 12v supply is external but more of how to execute cleanly. I would simply consider mounting a microswitch on top of the existing light by drilling a hole and attaching the positive lead across an SPST toggle. of course you might lose watertight integrity. But if you look you can also find pushbutton quick switches, or boots to cover the toggle.
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills
To be very honest, the thing that discouraged me the most with the 5.0 was the carbon fork. I don't need it, and in case I rode into the forest and the CF fork broke, Specialized would certainly say: "We clearly define VSL 5.0 is to be ridden on roads only, and we cannot honour your warranty in case of crash" :D
I've been riding on carbon forks on various bikes for many years and in some very rough, bumpy conditions. Unless you're doing full-on downhill MTB runs I wouldn't be concerned. The advantages include some weight savings and the ability to soak up small bumps and vibrations. Bikes with stiff aluminum frames and forks can transmit vibrations through the bars that make your fingers go numb on certain road types (such as the "chip seal" roads that are common in rural America). Carbon forks made a world of difference to me.

Of course, in your case the Redshift stem also serves for this purpose.
 

aj1

Member
Hi, The MSRP I paid through Specialized was actually a bit cheaper than an LBS authorized dealer because Specialized picked up the tab for road sticker registration.

HUGE difference between 5.0 and 4.0!
FutureShock + Carbon Fork
12 speed vs 10 speed
Deore XT vs Deore Shifter and Derailleur
Higher grade cassette
Shimano Chain
Carbon seatpost (EQ only)
Better rims
Higher spec Tektro brakes
Higher spec headlight
Higher spec saddle

5 cassette is 10-45t vs 4 cassette at 11-42t. 5 is faster by a bit and a bit more torque on a given grade at a given cadence. Doesn’t seem like a huge difference until you’re passing up a rider on a 4 🤣

In my opinion it’s an entirely different bike and great value. You can compare side by side on the website:


There is a detailed document describing max loads on the bike, also one specific to child carriers. I will look today. Note the carrier is a bit special because it’s integrated with the fenders on the EQ version. I’m not sure you’d need to change the rack though - it’s racktime compatible btw. Also rear wheel cargo limit is 55lbs/25kg.

Update: @aj1 - OK I had a look at the child seat addendum. Basically it’s a few warnings and disclaimers saying legally the bike was designed for one person and you assume all the risk. Also apparently the carrier/rear rack can carry 25 kg max rated. So really it’s just a matter of how you would go about mounting the child carrier.
Super, super helpful. Where did you find the child seat addendum documentation? Can you please link or post it? 25 kg would be great.

By the way, I purchased the 4.0 and pick it up on Sunday. Thanks so much for everyone’s help! You helped me make my purchase decision. I could afford the 5.0 without issue but the jump in price is large and I don’t know if it’s worth it to me. I also still need a second ebike for the spouse. Not sure which we’ll get. Maybe a step through Vado SL.

Just need to figure out the rear rack and we’re good.

Did anyone consider the Cannondale Roadlite:ON? Seems like a light bike, too. I didn’t realize it existed until now. Removable battery. I’d appreciate everyone’s thoughts and comparison to the Vado SL https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/electric-bikes/electric-hybrid-bike/roadlite-on/
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills

aj1

Member
Interesting and quite a bit different from the SL (removable motor??). Also it's from Canyon, not Cannondale and not likely for the US market with that 25mph limit.
Ah yeah, good point! Didn’t catch that. Thanks. Still interesting to see another similar bike. Hoping more bikes trend to lighter ones and less heavy, fast ones. I had a heavier ebike and it was great but I really like the idea of a bike that’s electric rather than an electric bike.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Interesting and quite a bit different from the SL (removable motor??). Also it's from Canyon, not Cannondale and not likely for the US market with that 25mph limit.

Hmm. I have a feeling the ad copy might be wrong:

"A removable battery
You can also ride the Roadlite:ON without the drive system.

Just remove the motor and battery, and fit the Fazua down tube cover (available separately).

Without the battery, the motor disengages entirely, so there's no extra resistance when you pedal."

That kind of suggests that the motor is still there but that it then works like the Specialized where you can ZERO out the power (not turn off the system) and then the drag is disengaged???

I mean it seems that there would have to be physical connections between the motor and pedals/crank system and it would not be simple to just remove it. But what do I know? And it is still 34+/- pounds which is heavier than the Creo. I don't know the weight of other models.
 

rochrunner

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Rochester Hills
Hmm. I have a feeling the ad copy might be wrong:
Maybe not. Here's a link to a Trek e-bike with the same Fazua system that clearly states that the motor is removable as well as the battery. I think they meant that you can remove just the battery, or optionally the motor as well. And some think the SL is expensive? :rolleyes:
  1. "The drive system, including the motor, is easily removable. Just take it out, pop on the included cover, and you’ll have a standard mountain bike that weighs 2.9kg less than before"
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Awesome- congratulations! If you are considering a range extender you might want to ask about availability. In Asia right now supplies are naught.
The Range Extender is also in short supply (none or, at least, almost none) in the US, too.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Maybe not. Here's a link to a Trek e-bike with the same Fazua system that clearly states that the motor is removable as well as the battery. I think they meant that you can remove just the battery, or optionally the motor as well. And some think the SL is expensive? :rolleyes:
  1. "The drive system, including the motor, is easily removable. Just take it out, pop on the included cover, and you’ll have a standard mountain bike that weighs 2.9kg less than before"
FYI
 

DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
Riding rough is the domain of youth. Nowadays, youngsters prefer gravel bikes to full suspension MTBs because (as they say) "riding the full is boring; riding rough means fun". Young body is supple and can stand a lot to experience more fun. None of us will get any younger though.

For me, it was not OK to ride on even slightly cracked asphalt and having had my head shaken. Or, riding over a short curb or a speed-bump and yell from pain in my lower back. I think I can deserve some comfort in my age.

Zooming on "fully suspended" Vado SL means a lot of pleasure. You're riding on rough asphalt, you don't suffer but rather enjoy how the suspension works for you. Riding at full speed onto the speed bump faster than any car could -- painlessly -- is true fun for me.

A riding buddy of mine is a dedicated gravel cyclist. Recently, he asked me of my honest opinion on Redshift ShockStop stem. He's not getting any younger either although he's only in his late forties.
Don't see myself going back from FS.
 

BEC111

Well-Known Member
Interesting and quite a bit different from the SL (removable motor??). Also it's from Canyon, not Cannondale and not likely for the US market with that 25mph limit.
yup, canyon not cannondale. darn auto correct 😀. Anyhow, not available in USA. Oh well. Looks interesting.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I might be wrong but I've read somewhere Canyon was a German direct sales company. If that's true, I'd expect trouble with post-sales service, especially overseas (North America). I might be wrong, of course.

Trek has recently started their romance with Fazua. As someone mentioned, Trek seems to be unhappy with the whole e-bike business but whatever Specialized does, Trek has to find their response. So Vado -> Allant+, Levo -> Rail, Levo SL -> E-Caliber etc. Before going with Canyon, I would carefully look how successful Trek is with their Fazua based E-Caliber e-MTB.