Specialized Turbo Vado SL: An Incredible E-Bike (User Club)

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
An interesting thought. Is the Class 3 Creo really that fast? Because, you see, I can catch up with almost any traditional roadie with my full power Vado, and even overtake them (time-trial roadies are faster!) :)

For me, Vado SL actually is a fitness e-bike. I was looking at different stats of my rides with Vado and Vado SL. My effort on the SL is typically twice of one recorded for the full power e-bike. It cannot be attributed to the motor assistance only!

if you figure a well trained roadie can put out 300w for a long time, on a regular bike, that’ll get them to 21-22 mph. they actually can’t go any faster on a type 1/2 ebike. the assist cuts off and their human power 300w is still the limit.

on a creo they get their 300 plus the bikes 240 past 20mph….. and can now go 28mph.

so really, the issue is class 1 vs 3, and aerodynamics.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
on a creo they get their 300 plus the bikes 240 past 20mph….. and can now go 28mph
Yes but 240 W is when you max the motor out (but that is not what you typically want). Now, I can put 110 W for some time if I have to. "Big" Vado motor maxes out at 520 W. Go figure.
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
See my e-bike KOM:
1633062374059.png

The max speed (on the flat) was slightly above 28 mph. You can see my cadence, and power. That was my Speed Vado 5.0. With a 38T chainring :D
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Yes but 240 W is when you max the motor out (but that is not what you typically want). Now, I can put 110 W for some time if I have to. "Big" Vado motor maxes out at 520 W. Go figure.
well, true! any source of approx 400w (on the drops, skinny tires) or 550w (on the bar tops, fat tires) on a class 3 ebike should result in 28mph. it can be any combination of human and machine!

big vado has enough power to overcome the higher drag, no doubt!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I agree aero plays a vital role at such speed! That's why I could never match any time-trial cyclists!
 

Rider51

Member
Region
USA
I haven’t done any true A:B:C tests with them, but the Vado will indeed motor along quickly. That 4x You power is very evident. I believe you are correct in thinking of the SL as a fitness e-bike.

In a similar light, the Vado is more of a workhorse form of transportation for most people. It just has a lot of oomph when you want it.

The Creo is just another beast though. It invites you to go fast, almost always. I don’t care if it’s “only” 2x You. The design of it, the light weight, the essence that it is a Roubaix with a motor, you can put out serious speed on it.

I suppose if one put Specialized CL50 carbon wheels on a Vado (if they fit!) with 700x28 tires, and drop bars (what the heck!) it could rip along at the 28mph cut out speed fairly effortlessly!
 

specialized_dc

New Member
Region
Europe
I haven’t done any true A:B:C tests with them, but the Vado will indeed motor along quickly. That 4x You power is very evident. I believe you are correct in thinking of the SL as a fitness e-bike.

In a similar light, the Vado is more of a workhorse form of transportation for most people. It just has a lot of oomph when you want it.

The Creo is just another beast though. It invites you to go fast, almost always. I don’t care if it’s “only” 2x You. The design of it, the light weight, the essence that it is a Roubaix with a motor, you can put out serious speed on it.

I suppose if one put Specialized CL50 carbon wheels on a Vado (if they fit!) with 700x28 tires, and drop bars (what the heck!) it could rip along at the 28mph cut out speed fairly effortlessly!
I mean the Creo SL is 3kg lighter than the Vado SL. You'd expect that 2x motor to be a bit more efficient with the less weight. That said, I'm extremely happy with the Vado 4.0 SL EQ performance. I've had it now a month or two for my daily commute and just going on some bike rides at the weekend to explore our neighbourhood. I'm loving it.

Would I get a Creo SL if I could afford it? Damn right I would. Look at the paint job!

Quick note about the standard Vado. That 4x motor is a beast. I don't really have anything to compare it to other than the SL at the shop, and it has no problem shifting the extra weight. If I had a really long commute (20km+) I'd have opted for that for sure. Unfortunately we also have no secure means of storage so 26kg bike on the wall doesn't go down well with the mrs ;-)
 

Rider51

Member
Region
USA
I'm very happy with my Vado SL EQ too. It's plenty fast enough for me. I'm fit enough, have no injuries (knock on wood), so it's only the toughest hills where I wish the motor put out more.

I probably could have (barely!) afforded the Creo SL (E5 version) when I bought the Vado SL earlier this year, but I didn't for the simple reason that I wanted an everyday fitness/commuter bike. One with fenders, lights, kick stand, sitting comfortably upright, etc.. The Creo just isn't like that. Sure, you could put fenders and lights on it, maybe a rack, but it's really a speed machine. My next bike will be a Creo though. :cool:
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
I'm very happy with my Vado SL EQ too. It's plenty fast enough for me. I'm fit enough, have no injuries (knock on wood), so it's only the toughest hills where I wish the motor put out more.

I probably could have (barely!) afforded the Creo SL (E5 version) when I bought the Vado SL earlier this year, but I didn't for the simple reason that I wanted an everyday fitness/commuter bike. One with fenders, lights, kick stand, sitting comfortably upright, etc.. The Creo just isn't like that. Sure, you could put fenders and lights on it, maybe a rack, but it's really a speed machine. My next bike will be a Creo though. :cool:
That the Creo model I have. I have put a rack on it and a rear light. I don't really ride at night anymore so don't really need a front light but could add a battery powered one if needed. I try not riding in rain so fenders are not on it at the moment. I do get caught in the rain and deal with it! Under my body, it is probably not "really a speed machine!" ;) And then with the 20 or 30 bike 10-essentials (hiking prep), it is even more loaded down!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Guys,

The Lezyne StVZO headlight as delivered with Vado SL simply rocks!

1634069758796.png


I was on my first long night ride with the Vado SL since I have bought it. Long kilometres spent on a smooth service road allowed me setting the angle (both vertical and lateral) with the GoPro mount I'm using. There was nothing I wouldn't see on the road at a distance of at least 25 metres! And the beam top cut-off made the approaching drivers happy.

At that short stop, I also assessed the visibility of the tail-light: just perfect. I felt so safe during long hours of pedalling in the darkness, with the subtle motor whirr, so I didn't feel alone...

See the temperature read-out: 7 C or 45 F. The Wahoo ELEMNT Roam has been eventually calibrated against GPS for Wheel Circumference for Schwalbe Smart Sam 37-622: the figure is 2157 mm (as opposed to 2180 specified by Specialized). 100% match with Strava! (In the Correct Distance mode, the distance ridden according to the map was virtually the same as given by Wahoo. And Wahoo gets the distance from the e-bike's rear wheel RPM and specified WhC).
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I've just ordered the second Range Extender plus a 220 mm cable.
I hope to be able to ride at 66% assistance for more than 100 km on group gravel rides.
I plan removing the fenders, rack, and relocating the tail-light for the Spring. Vado SL in such a configuration should become a Creo EVO equivalent for gravel cycling, minus the drop handlebars.

Now, I'm experimenting with discharging the RE first. That should help getting the main battery and the RE #1 at equal number of recharges.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
I've just ordered the second Range Extender plus a 220 mm cable.
I hope to be able to ride at 66% assistance for more than 100 km on group gravel rides.
I plan removing the fenders, rack, and relocating the tail-light for the Spring. Vado SL in such a configuration should become a Creo EVO equivalent for gravel cycling, minus the drop handlebars.

Now, I'm experimenting with discharging the RE first. That should help getting the main battery and the RE #1 at equal number of recharges.
Be prepared for when the power turns off as the RE approaches "zero" and that the system does not immediately switch to the Internal Battery. At least, that is what happened to me climbing a hill. "What? No POWER!!!?" I've only had that happen the one time. I went back to parallel discharge since it happened at an inconvenient time.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Be prepared for when the power turns off as the RE approaches "zero" and that the system does not immediately switch to the Internal Battery. At least, that is what happened to me climbing a hill. "What? No POWER!!!?" I've only had that happen the one time. I went back to parallel discharge since it happened at an inconvenient time.
Thank you for your warning! My intention for the next couple of days will be not discharging the RE totally but rather noting how much of range boost a single RE could give me, depending on the average assistance % and other factors.
 

Rider51

Member
Region
USA
I've just ordered the second Range Extender plus a 220 mm cable.
I hope to be able to ride at 66% assistance for more than 100 km on group gravel rides.
I plan removing the fenders, rack, and relocating the tail-light for the Spring. Vado SL in such a configuration should become a Creo EVO equivalent for gravel cycling, minus the drop handlebars.

Now, I'm experimenting with discharging the RE first. That should help getting the main battery and the RE #1 at equal number of recharges.
I like the way you are thinking, however to turn the Vado SL into a Diverge Evo-like variant of the Creo, you’d ideally also swap out the wheels to something lighter and more performance oriented. These wheels would be ideal, but aren’t cheap.

Then run something like Pathfinder Pro tires.

You might also find yourself flipping the stem to make things more aero.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I like the way you are thinking, however to turn the Vado SL into a Diverge Evo-like variant of the Creo, you’d ideally also swap out the wheels to something lighter and more performance oriented. These wheels would be ideal, but aren’t cheap.

Then run something like Pathfinder Pro tires.

You might also find yourself flipping the stem to make things more aero.
An interesting advice! I wouldn't rather swap the wheels as doing so feels to be above my station :) Could you explain "flipping the stem"? Meaning, pointing several degrees downwards? (Will Redshift ShockStop work oriented that way? Wait... It will!)
 
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Allan47.7339

Well-Known Member
An interesting advice! I wouldn't rather swap the wheels as doing so feels to be above my station :) Could you explain "flipping the stem"? Meaning, pointing several degrees downwards? (Will Redshift ShockStop work oriented that way? Wait... It will!)
Also known as "slamming the stem" to get a lower and more aero position by much younger riders. As a reference the Creo is considered a "somewhat upright position" vs the Crux with a "somewhat aggressive" position for gravel bikes.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Also known as "slamming the stem" to get a lower and more aero position by much younger riders. As a reference the Creo is considered a "somewhat upright position" vs the Crux with a "somewhat aggressive" position for gravel bikes.
Thank you both @Rider51 and @Allan47.7339! It looks very promising; let me check how flexible my body really is :)
 

Rider51

Member
Region
USA
The Vado SL comes with a 14 deg angled up stem that I think is 70 or 80mm long. That's fairly short, and fairly angled up. As Allan noted, if the Creo is fairly relaxed, compared to the Crux for example, the Vado SL is even more upright. In bike terms, the Vado SL has a shorter reach, and higher stack. So in this case you'd literally take the stem off, and flip it upside down. It's now a -14 deg stem. Which means your handlebars are now about an inch lower than they were before, putting you in a much more tucked, aero position.

A better option may be to just buy another stem that's a bit longer, and not as angled. Something around 110mm in length, and +6 degree rise, which is very common. This may not seem like a huge difference in numbers, but I assure you, if you've been riding a while in the current set-up, you'll notice. Stems are fairly easy to replace yourself.

The SL 5.0 with the future shock and carbon fork will perform better on gravel than the 4.0, though having something like the RedShift stem can certainly compensate. In my experience the future shock (1.5 and 2.0 that is) has better dampering and rebound than the RedShift stem, which can feel a little like a pogo-stick on some terrain (I have not tried the RedShift Pro, I should note). But I also know there are a lot of happy owners of RedShift as well.