Specialized Vado 3 Brake Upgrade??

lewes5

Member
I am thinking about upgrading the brakes on my Vado 3 to 203 front rotors and 180 rear rotors.

i assume increasing the rotor sizes would also require changing the calipers as well. Am I correct?

thanks in advance.

cheers
 

Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
I do not know how the calipers are mounted on the Vado, but usually you can change or add adapters to allow the calipers to clear larger rotors. That said, such large rotors on that type of bike is overkill (unless you happen to live in a mountainous area).
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
We live in a mountainous area. I did this upgrade on my Vado 5. The calipers did not need to be changed, but adapters were needed front and rear.

I moved the original front 180mm rotor to the rear and installed a new 203mm rotor in the front.

Works quite well. A noticable improvement on steep downhill braking.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I am thinking about upgrading the brakes on my Vado 3 to 203 front rotors and 180 rear rotors.

i assume increasing the rotor sizes would also require changing the calipers as well. Am I correct?

thanks in advance.

cheers
No you don't. You can still use your caliper.

I went from 180mm fixed disc to 203mm floating disc.

I just needed to get rid of 180mm caliper mount and switch to 203mm caliper mount.

Usually looks something like this:
Juscycling Disc Brake Caliper Mount Adapter is/Post Front 160/180/203mm Rear 140/160/180mm, 1 PCS
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Here's a pic of the front caliper with the Shimano adapter in place. The rear is similar, but with a different adapter. Note the UP arrow on the adapter. The rear adapter works with the adapter's arrow pointing generally down, towards the front of the bike. The caliper mounting screws were new with the adapters and included blue (removeable) thread lock.

0402201211a_Film1_20200403071806566.jpg


The rotor screws for the 180mm rotor were reused. I applied fresh blue thread lock to these screws before installing. The rotor screws are tough to remove. I ended up using my impact driver for this.

The most time consuming part of this process was centering the calipers over the rotors to prevent the pads from rubbing. I started with the caliper mounting bolts loose then squeezed the brake lever firmly. Tightening the bolts with the brake lever still pulled firmly pretty much centers the caliper, but not perfectly. I had to fine adjust one caliper and true up one rotor to prevent the pads from rubbing.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Here's a pic of the front caliper with the Shimano adapter in place. The rear is similar, but with a different adapter. Note the UP arrow on the adapter. The rear adapter works with the adapter's arrow pointing generally down, towards the front of the bike. The caliper mounting screws were new with the adapters and included blue (removeable) thread lock.

View attachment 50641

The rotor screws for the 180mm rotor were reused. I applied fresh blue thread lock to these screws before installing. The rotor screws are tough to remove. I ended up using my impact driver for this.

The most time consuming part of this process was centering the calipers over the rotors to prevent the pads from rubbing. I started with the caliper mounting bolts loose then squeezed the brake lever firmly. Tightening the bolts with the brake lever still pulled firmly pretty much centers the caliper, but not perfectly. I had to fine adjust one caliper and true up one rotor to prevent the pads from rubbing.
This video explains quite well. 😁

 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
This video explains quite well. 😁

Park Tool does have a wonderful set of FREE professionally produced instructional videos covering just about any maintenance topic you can think of. Naturally they promote their line of tools, but use the tools you've got is my moto.
 

steve marino

Active Member
That's a handy tool for setting the brake pad clearance, but how much time does it take to adjust the brakes on a caliper anyway? Not long. Run them in until they're tight, back them off a little, spin the wheels to check, and you're good to go. The rotor has to run true to begin any sort of adjustment, that's a given. On my calipers, there's an allen bolt on the back side to run the back pad in and out. Just looking at the pads and how they set on the rotor should give you all the information one would need to do this simple job. It's only tricky the first time you do it, and on a setup like mine w/ a separate allen adjustment for the back pad, that alignment tool won't help you anyway.
 
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Sierratim

Well-Known Member

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
That's a handy tool for setting the brake pad clearance, but how much time does it take to adjust the brakes on a caliper anyway? Not long. Run them in until they're tight, back them off a little, spin the wheels to check, and you're good to go. The rotor has to run true to begin any sort of adjustment, that's a given. On my calipers, there's an allen bolt on the back side to run the back pad in and out. Just looking at the pads and how they set on the rotor should give you all the information one would need to do this simple job. It's only tricky the first time you do it, and on a setup like mine w/ a separate allen adjustment for the back pad, that alignment tool won't help you anyway.
Do you have hydraulic or mechanical disc brakes?
 

lewes5

Member
Thank you all for your comments and advice. Its very clear to me that I need to become more knowledgeable about the parts and operation of hydraulic disk brakes.
No, I don’t ride in mountainous areas but I’ve hade to make two emergency stops at intersections. I believe I would be more comfortable with faster stoping power. I have experience no brake fade.

Again, thanks for the input. Exactly what I was hoping for.

chuck