Specialized Vs Stromer? Sorry for the repeat, but I need help

Turbo x w/extra bat: $3500 OR Stromer St2 $5000 (or more)

  • Turbo X

  • Stromer


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Leon Washington

New Member
Hello,
I am new to this forum and I apologize in advance because I have seen others with my similar dilemma. Thank you for tolerating my question.

I am on sabbatical from my position and am looking after my ailing grandmother. The area I currently live is a bit social economically challenged. I have had my car vandalized so much that it is not operable. Thus I purchased a "value" electric bike and found it marvelous.

I have enough money to upgrade and do spend a lot of time in front of the computer to do some research. I would like to reveal some options I have been exploring and post my needs and prioritized criteria. I humbly welcome insight from current and/or previous owners of the models I've narrowed down and input from bike experts is greatly appreciated.

The main purpose of the bike is primarily workout and transportation. I can't go to the gym, and my knee does not allow me to run. Unlike many, I welcome the sweat experience. I am a very active guy when I am home, but taking care of my grandmother, I cannot leave except to do errands. A workout bike will allow me to keep active

The bike must be a speed pedalec

Reliability is key, as there are not any bike shops in my area, and I'm not much of a bike mechanic.

My brother in Colorado has a Bosch Speed mid drive racing bike. It is nice, but I don't want to buy the same brand of bike. It would be nice to have some variety in the family. We plan on doing some long distance stuff when I visit, so I will have to purchase an extra battery, too

After extensive research, I have narrowed my choices down to the Stromer or the Turbo x Specialized. I can get last year's Turbo x and an extra battery for about $3400. Based on the reviews I've read the Specialized provides a good workout and at that price, I can sell it for at least half of what I paid, if I later chose to buy the newer Stromer.

The Stromer St2 is at least a couple thousand more, and this may not include the battery. I would love some feedback to determine if the high-end Stromer is worth the price difference. I have tested the ST2 and it was nice, but, I may have been riding it incorrectly, because it didn't seem to give me any workout at all. My Izip was better at getting my pulse up quickly. My test ride was only about 10 minutes, though. I also did try the high end Kalkohof (sp) and Adventura. I think they are the same company, but I did not like either. I did not get an opportunity to test the Specialized.

I know it is probably against everyone's opinion to buy a bike without test riding it. But I would rather be riding instead of searching and becoming more and more out of shape. My Izip has served its purpose and I am motivated to move to a higher end workout bike.

I am humbly await the opinion of the many experts on this website. I apologize if I have made any incorrect or ignorant statements. I am new to this site and I hope I am doing this within the guidelines. I respect everyone and anyone's input. Thank you in advance

Respectfully,
Doc Wash
 

SCbarber

New Member
I do not have either, yet, but I have read where the stromer's battery was not living up to what is advertised. It needed a recharge much earlier than it was suppose to. A few people have returned their ST2 for that reason so if I had to buy one now, I would probably aim for the turbo x myself.
 

James Kohls

Active Member
If the primary goal is fitness, the ST2 comes with bluetooth abilities to connect your smartphone and easily customize the bike's motor input for your workout. The Turbo S also has this ability, but the Turbo X does not. You can add the $1,000 battery pack and add smart phone features to the X. I'm guessing the 2nd battery pack you are speaking of is not the Turbo SC battery (691 WH capacity). I own a Turbo X and it can be quite a workout in lower eco modes. But the only configuration is gear and motor assistance percentage. Adding the Turbo SC battery allows customization of the Max Motor Current and Acceleration Response. You can even do some bike motor customization on the Stromer ST1 models using special codes, just not with a phone app.

As far as an extra battery is concerned, there are still some dealers that are doing the (Link Removed - No Longer Exists). The free battery is the smaller battery, but you are probably looking at the low end Specialized battery as well, given the price you quoted. The Stromer ST1 Platinum is more expensive (base price) than your closeout model Model X, but probably closer in price than the ST2.

Any of these bikes, regardless of apps/customization-ability are capable of giving you a workout depending on what levels of assistance you chose (torque you'd need to apply) or gear you are in (cadence/pedal revolutions per minute). Also, when you operate in the lowest levels of assist, the bicycle's physical gearing comes more into play. The ST2 is 20 speed, the X is 10 speed and the ST1 Platinum is 27 speed.

For reliability, both bikes are prone to their problems--mechanical, electric and electronic. You said you are not very savvy in terms of bicycle mechanics. Personally, I would learn that if you want to put thousands of dollars into an e-bike without any local dealer support. There are tons of youtube videos online. Find a cheap non-electric bike on craigslist and teach yourself how to remove wheels, adjust brakes, do basic bicycle maintenance, replace a chain, change a tire/tube, adjust shifters. Even with that knowledge, the electronics in a bike are going to require a local or relatively local dealer. Or you are going to have to pay dearly to ship your bike (likely both direction). Neither Stromer or Specialized allow public access to their software or interface cables for diagnosing and fixing electronics problems. I would think most e-bike owners (regardless of manufacturer) are going to need this level of support within 2-3 years. The more advanced features your bike has, the more that can go wrong—the more you will need a dealer vs. being able to fix it yourself.

Or maybe, in addition to teaching yourself how to repair your own bike, build one using a DIY e-bike kit like Bionix. Building an e-bike yourself means you know how it is put together. If you need to replace vs. repair one of the components, you will have better knowledge of how to do so. Again there are tons of videos on youtube and a dedicated section of this forum talking about this stuff.

Your profile says you are in Detroit. Have you checked out Amp Brothers in the Detroit area? The sell BH Easy Motion bikes. You could get a Nitro City or Neo Nitro Cross. Easy Motion also has a bluetooth smartphone option allowing bike customization.

Good luck.
 

Leon Washington

New Member
I do not have either, yet, but I have read where the stromer's battery was not living up to what is advertised. It needed a recharge much earlier than it was suppose to. A few people have returned their ST2 for that reason so if I had to buy one now, I would probably aim for the turbo x myself.
This is good information. Thank you. I'm wondering if the newest Stromer (St2s) is having better and more accurate range results?
 

Leon Washington

New Member
;)
If the primary goal is fitness, the ST2 comes with bluetooth abilities to connect your smartphone and easily customize the bike's motor input for your workout. The Turbo S also has this ability, but the Turbo X does not. You can add the $1,000 battery pack and add smart phone features to the X. I'm guessing the 2nd battery pack you are speaking of is not the Turbo SC battery (691 WH capacity). I own a Turbo X and it can be quite a workout in lower eco modes. But the only configuration is gear and motor assistance percentage. Adding the Turbo SC battery allows customization of the Max Motor Current and Acceleration Response. You can even do some bike motor customization on the Stromer ST1 models using special codes, just not with a phone app.

As far as an extra battery is concerned, there are still some dealers that are doing the (Link Removed - No Longer Exists). The free battery is the smaller battery, but you are probably looking at the low end Specialized battery as well, given the price you quoted. The Stromer ST1 Platinum is more expensive (base price) than your closeout model Model X, but probably closer in price than the ST2.

Any of these bikes, regardless of apps/customization-ability are capable of giving you a workout depending on what levels of assistance you chose (torque you'd need to apply) or gear you are in (cadence/pedal revolutions per minute). Also, when you operate in the lowest levels of assist, the bicycle's physical gearing comes more into play. The ST2 is 20 speed, the X is 10 speed and the ST1 Platinum is 27 speed.

For reliability, both bikes are prone to their problems--mechanical, electric and electronic. You said you are not very savvy in terms of bicycle mechanics. Personally, I would learn that if you want to put thousands of dollars into an e-bike without any local dealer support. There are tons of youtube videos online. Find a cheap non-electric bike on craigslist and teach yourself how to remove wheels, adjust brakes, do basic bicycle maintenance, replace a chain, change a tire/tube, adjust shifters. Even with that knowledge, the electronics in a bike are going to require a local or relatively local dealer. Or you are going to have to pay dearly to ship your bike (likely both direction). Neither Stromer or Specialized allow public access to their software or interface cables for diagnosing and fixing electronics problems. I would think most e-bike owners (regardless of manufacturer) are going to need this level of support within 2-3 years. The more advanced features your bike has, the more that can go wrong—the more you will need a dealer vs. being able to fix it yourself.

Or maybe, in addition to teaching yourself how to repair your own bike, build one using a DIY e-bike kit like Bionix. Building an e-bike yourself means you know how it is put together. If you need to replace vs. repair one of the components, you will have better knowledge of how to do so. Again there are tons of videos on youtube and a dedicated section of this forum talking about this stuff.

Your profile says you are in Detroit. Have you checked out Amp Brothers in the Detroit area? The sell BH Easy Motion bikes. You could get a Nitro City or Neo Nitro Cross. Easy Motion also has a bluetooth smartphone option allowing bike customization.

Good luck.
This is precisely the information I needed. Thank you very much. I have tried the Emotion bikes. They are wonderful. I tried the Neo 29 or Evo 29 (I think). It was great, but I chose my Izip bike instead. This is just my personal opinion when I bought my bike is that the Izip was a bit more of a workout. But they have new models now, so I may try them again. I had no idea about the interaction with the phone. The Amp Bros is where I went Hazel Park, MI.

I thought the Turbo X had all the computer stuff, but it sounds like I would have to buy that separately. Good to know. I have been watching lots of the e-bike review videos. Now I will watch the repair videos as well. That newest Stromer ST2s looks like the best bike on the market. I would think for what it costs, it should be able to repair itself.;) Thank you again. This is better and more thorough information than going to a bike shop.
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
The one thing I didn't like about the Specialized Turbo is that it starts pulling power about 2mph before the speed cutout (which was 25mph on the model I rode.) I hear the current 28mph versions do the same thing. The Stromer will happily cruise at 28mph all day or until you drain the battery. The ST1 has the same motor on it so, if you don't need the extra range, the ST1 might be a better option.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
the ST1 has a different motor from both the the ST2 and the Specialized, not sure which one you were comparing to. The ST1 is 36 volt the ST2 is 48 volt. the Specialized is 36 volt but a different brand, Go Swiss. My advice is either go with what the local bike shop can fix either purchased locally or from the net, local shop would not budge form list. they may treat you better locally if you buy from them, ask if you get a loaner if yours is out of service
 
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Dunbar

Well-Known Member
the ST1 has a different motor from both the the ST2 and the Specialized, not sure which one you were comparing to. The ST1 is 36 volt the ST2 is 48 volt. the Specialized is 36 volt but a different brand, Go Swiss.

What I meant is that they are both 500 watt direct drive motors. I test rode both the ST1 and ST2 against the Cross Current (which I eventually bought.) I couldn't feel a difference between the ST1 and ST2 in performance or responsiveness. I think what you're getting in the ST2 is a bigger battery, better components and more features. I have lots of experience with expensive drivetrains from my road cycling. I don't personally see the point of getting high end shifting components on a e-bike.
 

Cameron Newland

Well-Known Member
If you get the ST2, you probably won't need to carry an extra battery. I think that makes a strong case for the ST2. The Turbo X, though, might have a slightly more comfortable ride due to the front suspension fork. I've ridden the ST2 and ST2S and they actually seemed surprisingly comfortable even though they lack suspension.
 

Avao

New Member
I have owned a 2015 Specialized Turbo X for one month and use it for commuting (under 15 miles daily) on bike paths/city streets and for pulling a child in a bike trailer on the weekends. It makes commuting pleasant rather than something I would find excuses to avoid on my regular bike. The Stromer ST2 I test rode was more powerful especially uphill - what an amazing bike! I didn't try out the 2016 Turbo X or S. Mostly economics limited me to the older Turbo X but I also had concerns about theft. I park the bike on the street all day outside a guarded office building. One always worries about having a nice bike stolen. For me, the worry is greater with a $7000 bike vs. a $2600 one. I would want insurance on a top end e-bike, which can be costly.

The 2015 Turbo X is on sale for around $2600. I believe a replacement battery is around $800-1000, so $3400 seems right, just make sure the extra one is a new Specialized 468 wh battery. The black satin coloration is low profile/stealthy.

The 2016 Stromer ST1 and 2016 Specialized Turbo X are in the $4000-4500 range.

How far do you want to travel on a single charge and do you really need an extra battery? In Eco mode, say at 60% you can go a long way on a relatively flat ride. The range is reported as 25-55 miles depending on how much assist you use. At $7000, the 2016 Stromer ST2 is more powerful (500 watt vs, 200 watt motor), though less of a workout using full power assist and has a longer lasting battery (814 wh vs. 468 wh). The range is reported as 60-120 miles. The Stromer has anti-theft technology (nice) and the bluetooth workout stuff (I wouldn't use). Will you have have to carry it up stairs? Turbo is 49.5 lbs. Stromer is over 60 lbs. The depreciation on the Stromer will be worse by net $. There are many more Specialized than Stromer dealers in the U.S. so it should be easier to have a Turbo repaired.

If you decide on an ST2, make sure you are getting a 2016 model. The shop I went to test ride the Stromers was selling the 2015s at $0 discount and didn't mention they were last year's models.

I decided that the 2015 Turbo X would more than suffice for now and that if circumstances change in the future, I can upgrade to a top of the line model.

We are fortunate to have such choices to make!
 

Avao

New Member
A member posted this link on another thread. It shows a new Turbo 514wh battery retails for $800.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Hi Doc - was wondering if you made a selection? I'm Detroit area as well and shopping also. The bike shop at Eastern Market has 1 Kalkhoff (I think the Impulse 10) marked down significantly. I discussed with them ordering the Integrale S11 but I am delaying my purchase until next spring so no decisions are imminent. Any consideration of the Trek XM700+? That is high on my list for a few reasons 1). availability of service (dealer 1 mile from my house), 2). mid drive - easier to remove rear wheel and 3). light - less than 50 pounds. I'd be interested to know how your search has progressed. Thanks
 

tcb

New Member
I have owned a 2015 Specialized Turbo X for one month and use it for commuting (under 15 miles daily) on bike paths/city streets and for pulling a child in a bike trailer on the weekends. It makes commuting pleasant rather than something I would find excuses to avoid on my regular bike. The Stromer ST2 I test rode was more powerful especially uphill - what an amazing bike! I didn't try out the 2016 Turbo X or S. Mostly economics limited me to the older Turbo X but I also had concerns about theft. I park the bike on the street all day outside a guarded office building. One always worries about having a nice bike stolen. For me, the worry is greater with a $7000 bike vs. a $2600 one. I would want insurance on a top end e-bike, which can be costly.

The 2015 Turbo X is on sale for around $2600. I believe a replacement battery is around $800-1000, so $3400 seems right, just make sure the extra one is a new Specialized 468 wh battery. The black satin coloration is low profile/stealthy.

The 2016 Stromer ST1 and 2016 Specialized Turbo X are in the $4000-4500 range.

How far do you want to travel on a single charge and do you really need an extra battery? In Eco mode, say at 60% you can go a long way on a relatively flat ride. The range is reported as 25-55 miles depending on how much assist you use. At $7000, the 2016 Stromer ST2 is more powerful (500 watt vs, 200 watt motor), though less of a workout using full power assist and has a longer lasting battery (814 wh vs. 468 wh). The range is reported as 60-120 miles. The Stromer has anti-theft technology (nice) and the bluetooth workout stuff (I wouldn't use). Will you have have to carry it up stairs? Turbo is 49.5 lbs. Stromer is over 60 lbs. The depreciation on the Stromer will be worse by net $. There are many more Specialized than Stromer dealers in the U.S. so it should be easier to have a Turbo repaired.

If you decide on an ST2, make sure you are getting a 2016 model. The shop I went to test ride the Stromers was selling the 2015s at $0 discount and didn't mention they were last year's models.

I decided that the 2015 Turbo X would more than suffice for now and that if circumstances change in the future, I can upgrade to a top of the line model.

We are fortunate to have such choices to make!

Hello Avao, can you share some more information on how to get the 2015 Turbo X for $2600? That seems to be a great deal. Thanks.
 

James Kohls

Active Member
@tcb Talk to your Specialized dealer. Tell them you heard Specialized still has 2015 Turbo X's in their warehouse for $2600. Ask them to check. A few weeks ago I talked to my LBS, they still had over 70 in stock between their east and west coast warehouses.
 

elbikefun

Active Member
Are not familiar with The Specialized brand. But got a Stromer ST2S earlier this summer.
Are very satisfied with it. No troubles.
I have not been conscioius about range; other than that a charge lasts "forever". Offcourse depending on all kinds of factors. These bikes got upto / twice the capacity as some bikes. The bike comes with a fast-charger with a cooling-fan. This gigant battery is filled within 4-5 hours.

Have a look at this video:

It shows two guys bicycling stage one of the Amgen Tour of California on Stromer ST2S-bikes. The stage was 110 miles ( aprox 177 km). The bikes held the distance.

I think the ST2S (havent tryed the ST2, but believe it would be the same thing) is very dynamic bike. The top speed, agility (how fast response) and torque -parameters are all adjustable depending on the riders preferences. Also; I sometimes turn off the power when bicycling. It i s surprisingly ride`able unpowered as well !!!

The backside of owning sutch a expensive bike; is the consern/ risk of theft. In a challenged area; I would not leave it outside at all.....
 

tcb

New Member
@tcb Talk to your Specialized dealer. Tell them you heard Specialized still has 2015 Turbo X's in their warehouse for $2600. Ask them to check. A few weeks ago I talked to my LBS, they still had over 70 in stock between their east and west coast warehouses.

Thanks for the info James ... I will do that :)
 

Avao

New Member
Hello Avao, can you share some more information on how to get the 2015 Turbo X for $2600? That seems to be a great deal. Thanks.

Good advice from James.

I understand that the Specialized rear hub drive Turbo base and Turbo X are being discontinued after 2016. The new 2017 Specialized Vado models are mid drive. The 2016 Turbo base and Turbo X are now on sale for $2500 and $4000, respectively. The 2016 Turbo base has the same battery and motor as the 2015 Turbo X. The Xs have front suspension. The 2016 X vs. the 2015 X: stronger motor (250W vs. 200 W), a larger battery capacity (562 Wh vs. 468Wh), and a higher top assist speed (28 mph vs. 26 mph). However, at current sales prices the 2016 X is 50+% more expensive.

The 2015 X was originally $4000, so there may be deeper discounts for the 2016s in the coming months.

If you would like a bike sooner and prefer front suspension, the 2015 Turbo X is a good deal. If you can wait 4-6 months, then the 2016s may be further discounted. If you prefer to hold off until next Spring/Summer, you could check out the new Vado models.