Specialized’s ultra-light 120-mile range e-bike - Turbo Vado SL

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Looks like a great bike for fit riders looking for a low power/high range option.


Specialized has just released the latest edition to its Turbo e-bike lineup, the Specialized Turbo Vado SL. With “SL” standing for Super Light, this is also one of the lightest e-bikes in Specialized’s lineup, weighing in at as little as 33 lb (14.9 kg).
The motor is designed to provide up to 200% of the rider’s pedaling output, and specific emphasis was placed on programming the motor and controller to feel as natural as possible when it rolls on the power.

The idea is to maintain the rider as the central unit of the bike and to keep the assist as just that — an assist system that doesn’t detract from the ride experience that cycling enthusiasts find so critical.

specialized-turbo-vado-sl.jpg


An internal 320Wh battery is designed to provide up to 80 miles (128 km) of range, at least when used in Eco Mode.

Higher-power modes will reduce that range a bit, though Specialized also offers a range extender battery that fits in one of two water bottle holders and can add another 40 miles (64 km) of range, bringing the total max range up to 120 miles (193 km).


The Specialized Turbo Vado SL is available starting today from as low as $3,350.
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Looks like a great bike for fit riders looking for a low power/high range option.
What I hate about the SL line is the un-removable main battery.

@FlatSix911: The second thought. The bike weighs perhaps 10 kg less than the Turbo Vado. The rider is the heaviest part of the equation. You can set the assistance level as you like in the regular Vado by Mission Control, meaning you can have little power and long range. So I can't understand the SL concept, only the fact the bike is super light.
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Looks like a great bike for fit riders looking for a low power/high range option.


Specialized has just released the latest edition to its Turbo e-bike lineup, the Specialized Turbo Vado SL. With “SL” standing for Super Light, this is also one of the lightest e-bikes in Specialized’s lineup, weighing in at as little as 33 lb (14.9 kg).
The motor is designed to provide up to 200% of the rider’s pedaling output, and specific emphasis was placed on programming the motor and controller to feel as natural as possible when it rolls on the power.

The idea is to maintain the rider as the central unit of the bike and to keep the assist as just that — an assist system that doesn’t detract from the ride experience that cycling enthusiasts find so critical.


An internal 320Wh battery is designed to provide up to 80 miles (128 km) of range, at least when used in Eco Mode.

Higher-power modes will reduce that range a bit, though Specialized also offers a range extender battery that fits in one of two water bottle holders and can add another 40 miles (64 km) of range, bringing the total max range up to 120 miles (193 km).



The Specialized Turbo Vado SL is available starting today from as low as $3,350.

Really compelling design.
At 33lbs, it would be city dwellers preferred choice.
Mahle developed this motor for them, I believe.

This is what innovation should be like. High-quality, relatively affordable and lots of useful features.
 

Art Deco

Active Member
Sub 40 pound bikes could come pretty quickly if this sells well. I'd love to see more lightweight , long range bikes rather than pushing for higher acceleration and higher speeds on 60 plus pounders. But I don't ride in city traffic, either.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Replaceable? it is; you just need the shop to do it for you.
There happen to be cold winters on many continents and in many countries or states, maybe not in California. I cannot imagine carrying the bike to the flat to ensure the battery is at proper temperature...
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Really compelling design.
A Class 3 e-bike with a 320 Wh battery and the 240 W (max) motor? Is it only me who can see something is substantially wrong there? ;)
P.S. I apologise. The Creo can do it (but it is a road bike, not a commuter).
P.S.2. To be not completely negative, I would say the motor in the Vado SL is probably to be only used against headwind and to climb easier.
 

StmbtDave

Active Member
From what I understand, the battery is removable by the user. You do have to first remove the motor. With the main battery removed you can power the bike with the Range Extender. This makes traveling/shipping of the bike feasible.
 

StmbtDave

Active Member
A Class 3 e-bike with a 320 Wh battery and the 240 W (max) motor? Is it only me who can see something is substantially wrong there? ;)
P.S. I apologise. The Creo can do it (but it is a road bike, not a commuter).
P.S.2. To be not completely negative, I would say the motor in the Vado SL is probably to be only used against headwind and to climb easier.
As Chancelucky2 observed, this is a Creo with flat bars. I absolutely love my Creo. It does mean you can't mount all the doodads that you have on yours. :D