Speed display goes to zero when I coast

Lightning P38

Active Member
I just installed an ebikekit and got in my first test ride. 36 v li ion battery, 500 watt rear wheel geared motor. The displayed mph decreases based on my pedaling speed and goes to zero when coasting. The odometer appears to do the same. I was riding on pas 3 and had a decent boost while pedaling. I like the kit except for the inaccurate mph, and the average mph as well. Is this normal? Or do I have a setting that needs to be changed? Thx.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
The motor in a geared rear hub setup stops when you are coasting. For your speedo, this means no speed signal. Solution is to add an external speed sensor. Pretty easy to install a magnet on a spoke, and a pick up that senses when the magnet goes by. Cheap too(less than 10.00 usually).
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
The motor in a geared rear hub setup stops when you are coasting. For your speedo, this means no speed signal. Solution is to add an external speed sensor. Pretty easy to install a magnet on a spoke, and a pick up that senses when the magnet goes by. Cheap too(less than 10.00 usually).

Thanks...this is all new to me. I called the company and they said if I disconnect the throttle, the mph will read correctly. I am not thrilled with that response. I have a newer gps bike computer I can put back on the bike.....as you suggest, that is the best solution.
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
The motor in a geared rear hub setup stops when you are coasting. For your speedo, this means no speed signal. Solution is to add an external speed sensor. Pretty easy to install a magnet on a spoke, and a pick up that senses when the magnet goes by. Cheap too(less than 10.00 usually).

Another question I have is my battery charge level. On my first ride of 8 miles yesterday, had pas set at 2 or 3, used the throttle a bit on some starts, and my battery level still shows a 100% charged. But I have been charging the battery today for over an hour now. Is the battery gauge that inaccurate, or is something else going on?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I bought a recumbent tadpole trike from a branch of that business. Speedometer works the same as yours. It's also not accurate for distance since that drops out too while coasting. I set my PAS settings from 1-5 to 1-9. Gives me a little more range as I can micro adjust the level of assist I like. The battery level is all over the place. It can be so drained under power that you get the warning flashing data. But stop and rest a minute and you'll one full bar, maybe 2 if you were climbing a grade when it started to flash. I just use that battery level gauge on there as a rough estimate. You'll understand more about range when you get more experience on the bike. Their system is really crude in comparison to the Bosch powered bikes I also ride.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
To be clear, I wasn't really thinking a GPS solution. Many (most?) controllers are set up for an external speed control. They're very simple gizmo's that consist of a magnet and a sensor.

Like this:

Agree, things will start making more sense as you ride it. You'll become a more efficient rider, AND understand your bikes functions much better.
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
To be clear, I wasn't really thinking a GPS solution. Many (most?) controllers are set up for an external speed control. They're very simple gizmo's that consist of a magnet and a sensor.

Like this:

Agree, things will start making more sense as you ride it. You'll become a more efficient rider, AND understand your bikes functions much better.

All the plug-ins to the controller are in use....so I have no where to connect a sensor. I don’t really want to open the controller box either. I get what you are saying...thanks much for info.
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
I bought a recumbent tadpole trike from a branch of that business. Speedometer works the same as yours. It's also not accurate for distance since that drops out too while coasting. I set my PAS settings from 1-5 to 1-9. Gives me a little more range as I can micro adjust the level of assist I like. The battery level is all over the place. It can be so drained under power that you get the warning flashing data. But stop and rest a minute and you'll one full bar, maybe 2 if you were climbing a grade when it started to flash. I just use that battery level gauge on there as a rough estimate. You'll understand more about range when you get more experience on the bike. Their system is really crude in comparison to the Bosch powered bikes I also ride.

Thanks for that info....it reassures me that there is not something wrong, it is just that inaccurate! I just finished up charging the battery for 1.5 hours to a full charge, when the gauge said it was already fully charged. I am going on a 15 mile ride Sunday, and may get the battery low enough to see some movement on the gauge. Now I understand why guys get a separate battery charge level unit that is more accurate...but I don’t know how it would plug into this kit, as the only open plug is the charger plug-in. So they must do some sort of modification to make it work.

I need to get a volt meter from Lowes so I can check the charge level more accurately at home.

At any rate, I will learn more as I use it.
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
I bought a recumbent tadpole trike from a branch of that business. Speedometer works the same as yours. It's also not accurate for distance since that drops out too while coasting. I set my PAS settings from 1-5 to 1-9. Gives me a little more range as I can micro adjust the level of assist I like. The battery level is all over the place. It can be so drained under power that you get the warning flashing data. But stop and rest a minute and you'll one full bar, maybe 2 if you were climbing a grade when it started to flash. I just use that battery level gauge on there as a rough estimate. You'll understand more about range when you get more experience on the bike. Their system is really crude in comparison to the Bosch powered bikes I also ride.


To be clear, I wasn't really thinking a GPS solution. Many (most?) controllers are set up for an external speed control. They're very simple gizmo's that consist of a magnet and a sensor.

Like this:

Agree, things will start making more sense as you ride it. You'll become a more efficient rider, AND understand your bikes functions much better.

my battery has a standard 3 prong household plug for the discharge plug of the battery. I am wondering if I take a digital volt meter and wire up a 3 prong plug, I could get an accurate reading of my battery status?? What could go wrong??
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
P38, was this from ebikeling? Not that many geared motor kits around. I saw the same issue. While it's like 8 bucks to install a bike computer, and get a more accurate result, his controllers with LCD had terrible pedal assist response. All 5 levels feel like level 5 with the LCD display.

I like his motors.And the same 22A controller works well with the 3 speed LED only display, but I junked his controller with the SW900 display for a different LCD/controller combo. I looked inside the ebikeling controller. Never found any pins that would accept an externa; speed sensor.

And I don't believe your vendor about disconnecting the throttle to see the speed.

Also, only two of the wires in that battery cable carry power. You can just put your voltmeter across the two wires to the controller. A 36V pack will read 42.0V at fullcharge. When it says 36V, it's down to 40-50%, and bike response is pretty weak. Not worth hooking up a meter to see that.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
my battery has a standard 3 prong household plug for the discharge plug of the battery. I am wondering if I take a digital volt meter and wire up a 3 prong plug, I could get an accurate reading of my battery status?? What could go wrong??
This will help you decide.
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
P38, was this from ebikeling? Not that many geared motor kits around. I saw the same issue. While it's like 8 bucks to install a bike computer, and get a more accurate result, his controllers with LCD had terrible pedal assist response. All 5 levels feel like level 5 with the LCD display.

I like his motors.And the same 22A controller works well with the 3 speed LED only display, but I junked his controller with the SW900 display for a different LCD/controller combo. I looked inside the ebikeling controller. Never found any pins that would accept an externa; speed sensor.

And I don't believe your vendor about disconnecting the throttle to see the speed.

Also, only two of the wires in that battery cable carry power. You can just put your voltmeter across the two wires to the controller. A 36V pack will read 42.0V at fullcharge. When it says 36V, it's down to 40-50%, and bike response is pretty weak. Not worth hooking up a meter to see that.

Thanks for your comments. I will just use a volt meter on the two wires. Simple is best. I am getting a small digital volt meter. My old analog meter scale is too compressed to read precisely. I will have to learn by the feel when I am approaching empty on the battery.

Yes the kit is from ebike.com, dba as Electric Bike Technologies, Croydon. PA.

Good to know there is not a connection for a speed sensor, as I did not want to open up the controller.

I bought the kit from my recumbent maker, Lightning Cycles, in CA. They only carried one kit from ebiking, the 36 volt, 10 amp hr batt, and 500 watt motor. So I just bought the one they were selling for my bike, as I needed help getting up the really big hills here....500 ft climbs. Glad to hear I got a good motor. I was debating between 250 watt and 500 watts for the motor. Glad I went with the 500.

Thanks again Harry.
I am originally from N.E Iowa. Have done across state rides in Wis, and Mich., and western Il. And parts of Ragbrai.

Ken
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
P38, was this from ebikeling? Not that many geared motor kits around. I saw the same issue. While it's like 8 bucks to install a bike computer, and get a more accurate result, his controllers with LCD had terrible pedal assist response. All 5 levels feel like level 5 with the LCD display.

I like his motors.And the same 22A controller works well with the 3 speed LED only display, but I junked his controller with the SW900 display for a different LCD/controller combo. I looked inside the ebikeling controller. Never found any pins that would accept an externa; speed sensor.

And I don't believe your vendor about disconnecting the throttle to see the speed.

Also, only two of the wires in that battery cable carry power. You can just put your voltmeter across the two wires to the controller. A 36V pack will read 42.0V at fullcharge. When it says 36V, it's down to 40-50%, and bike response is pretty weak. Not worth hooking up a meter to see that.

More questions Harry,
What controller and display did you get to replace the original? And what improvements did you see from the replacements. Wondering if I should do that too.

thanks
Ken
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
ebikeing not the same seller as ebikeling, who is a local guy on ebay/amazon here in Chicago. The problem I had was overboosted pedal assist, making it hard to ride slow.

I like KT conrollers and their associated displays. They sell sinewave and square wave models. I recently re-installed a square wave model that I originally bought in 2016. It makes a whirring ebike noise, while the sinewave models are quieter. Most run on both 36V and 48V, wgich is convenient if you have both battery voltages. Come in all sizes from 13A to 25A max,
 

Lightning P38

Active Member
ebikeing not the same seller as ebikeling, who is a local guy on ebay/amazon here in Chicago. The problem I had was overboosted pedal assist, making it hard to ride slow.

I like KT conrollers and their associated displays. They sell sinewave and square wave models. I recently re-installed a square wave model that I originally bought in 2016. It makes a whirring ebike noise, while the sinewave models are quieter. Most run on both 36V and 48V, wgich is convenient if you have both battery voltages. Come in all sizes from 13A to 25A max,

I looked at his web site. Nice selection.

Ken
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Ken, I'm another big KT fan. I believe they have outstanding programming and are super when it comes to setting them up exactly how you want them. Lots of support available.

I get them here. They have good support, and have been responsive to the few issues I've had.

These are marked "square wave torque simulation" but in my experience run as quiet as a sine wave. -Al