Step Thru frame

carl

New Member
Iam looking for opinions on Step -thru model bikes since have arthritis in my hip. Looking at some of the low step thru designs the frames look weak to me. Will these frames support a 200 lbs plus rider? Thanks.
 

SCbiker

Active Member
IMG_20161227_191441.jpg
Hi ... I am a fan of step thru frames ... Allows you to flat foot the bike at a stop light etc and makes moving forward after a stop easy.
Also if you plan on a rear rack ... With paniers or a bag ( I grocery shop on mine) makes remounting and controlling the top heavy added weight easier. I'm pretty spry and in good shape but have really enjoyed the step thru design ... Very user friendly .... As far as weak or flimsey mine is a double diamond design and the bike is very stiff and holds a line very well in corners on less than good roads ... Alot of offerings out there ... Encourage you to go ride some ... Bet you like em...Here is a pic of mine as an example
 

carl

New Member
Now that I have determined that I need a step thru frame can anyone tell me How I can tell what size frame I should be looking for? Back when I could ride a regular men's 10 speed it had 25 ' rims and I think it had a 29-30 inch height. I can't seem to find specs. on frames form the manufactures ?
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Iam looking for opinions on Step -thru model bikes since have arthritis in my hip. Looking at some of the low step thru designs the frames look weak to me. Will these frames support a 200 lbs plus rider? Thanks.

Pay attention to the type frame SC Biker shows. Many step throughs are VERY flexible from them "removing" the top tube. Nasty handling (at speed) step throughs used to the rule rather than the exception. Now I see more reinforcing in those designs MOSTLY, but NOT all. As you note, weight has a great impact on flexing bike frames! Heed your concern.
 

Alan Acock

Member
I had a Trek Madone 5.2 Road bike with a 56cm height. I just bought an ebike, Trek xm700+, and was able to find a rare step over model. I got a 45cm height and it is great. The webpage SCbiker above mentions indicates I should have a 54cm height for my road bike and a 45cm height for a mountain bike. My xm700+ is more like a mountain bike than it is like a road bike. Bottom line is it is critical to try out a height for a particular bike.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Iam looking for opinions on Step -thru model bikes since have arthritis in my hip. Looking at some of the low step thru designs the frames look weak to me. Will these frames support a 200 lbs plus rider? Thanks.
Flat foot frames allow you to mount with out lifting a leg over the seat. Ride an Electra Townie, KHS Smoothie, or similar frame. I'm unable to mount any other frame other than a flat foot, crank is forward 10-14" further than a regular bike. I recently finished kitting a step through, flat foot frame and it's incredible! I used a KHS Smoothie.
 

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JohnT

Active Member
Our lowest step through is the Pedego Boomerang and Boomerang Plus. With the mag wheel upgrade, I think it's rated for 400 or 450 lbs., and with wire spokes, I think it's 250 or 280 lbs. (As a Pedego dealer, I should know this stuff!) The step over height is ultra-low at about 9".
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Our lowest step through is the Pedego Boomerang and Boomerang Plus. With the mag wheel upgrade, I think it's rated for 400 or 450 lbs., and with wire spokes, I think it's 250 or 280 lbs. (As a Pedego dealer, I should know this stuff!) The step over height is ultra-low at about 9".
Are there any crank forward designs for us aging baby boomers?
 

JohnT

Active Member
Are there any crank forward designs for us aging baby boomers?
Sorry, Thomas, not from Pedego. The Boomerang actually pushes the crank back to make more room to step through.

I've always been curious about the Rans bikes crank forward design, but haven't tried one yet.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Sorry, Thomas, not from Pedego. The Boomerang actually pushes the crank back to make more room to step through.

I've always been curious about the Rans bikes crank forward design, but haven't tried one yet.
I find the Rans to radically foot forward for me. My favorite is, rather was, the Trek Pure. Now the Electra Townie, followed by 2015 and older KHS Smoothies. (They downgraded and reduced prices)
 

fxr3

Active Member
I'll chime in here with great confidence!
STROMER ST1 and STROMER ST2! I own both, I'm 6'0 220lb and have over 5k miles between the 2.
They only come in one size and all the size charts talk can easily be adjusted with bars, stems and seat posts.
Mine have been almost bullet proof, perform as promised, and have the added plus of being the best looking
" girls bikes" of all time(imo). St1 is a little easier to step into, but both are way easier to get on and off than a men's frame. As far as rigidity, notice how top bar is getting lower annually on mountain bikes. You won't regret buying a stromer step-thru. Barry
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Bummer not crank forward. Switching gear here thinking folding for next frame, sadly another design with no crank forward attitude. Have I indicated I'm posed regarding flat foot geometry. VBG
 

fxr3

Active Member
I had a Electra townie for a decade. There is no correlation between how you "mount" a townie and how it's design(and intended advantages).
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
I had a Electra townie for a decade. There is no correlation between how you "mount" a townie and how it's design(and intended advantages).
Can you explain please? I find that with that geometry I don't have to lift and extend a leg to mount. I can mount from behind and being disabled never have to jump up onto or off of a seat. Nearly as easy to get on and off as a step through, with the added advantage of being able to flat foot while fully on the seat in the riding position.
Thanks for the feedback! But I think you missed an important aspect of the frame geometry for aging baby boomers. I have 5 flat foot or crank forward frames, nearly identical to the Townie frame

T
 
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fxr3

Active Member
I also have arthritis in my knees(and seems like everywhere else). I find the mounting of a step thru much less painful than throwing my leg over townie seat. Once I have stepped thru, it requires a natural pedal and star to get on seat. When stopping I feel I just naturally slip back down to standing in stepthru till I'm ready to go again and when I want off, I just step over frame and I'm off- where townie leg has to come back over seat and that is the move my body doesn't like.
Plus the pedal forward design hurts my knees too, as my knees prefer a more vertical motion.
 

fxr3

Active Member
Actually today I found the ultimate fix for both of us while riding a turbo Levo. A dropper seat post!
I was making my way to a curb to mount the thing and the salesman says "hey just drop the seat", I did and made mounting far easier than I could have imagined!
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Dropping the seat throws the geometry off for my pedaling. I do like the step through HKS Crank forward. They apparently have a work around on the patent as the forward portion is as much as the Townie.
 

fxr3

Active Member
The dropper seat is beneficial (for us) to mount the bike, once you take off, you push lever, lighten your butt on seat- and seat jacks up to where you want it for riding. Then when you need to stop, same lever drops seat to flat foot stance, then repeat. Funny, all mountain bike sites only brag on being able to flat foot while riding in difficult terrain- not one mentions it's advantage on mounting bike! My experience are from very recent test rides.
Electra may have patent on feet forward thing, but patents only last 17 years, so prolly has expired. I like the concept, but my knees and hips prefer a more vertical posture, and getting my leg over seat to mount and dismount is really not possible. I even use curbs or any available high spot to mount my step thrus
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Hi!

Thanks, I'm really not trying to sell anyone on a Townie, but I don't have to lift a leg to mount. Without a rear pannier or basket i can simply slightly lift and spread my legs to mount from the rear. I always say the most important feature is the one that makes the individual rider the most comfortable. I'm glad you have your solution! Thanks for sharing, I learned something today!