Strongly considering a pair of Specialized Turbo Como 3.0's, have some questions

LeakestWink

New Member
Hello:

I am looking to buy a pair of e-bikes for myself and my wife for general fitness, activity, and sightseeing while also transporting our child, currently 13 mos. old. I have read good things about the Turbo Como, and there are some local shops that sell it. Before I buy, I wanted to run some questions by the community. Of note, I am restricting my search to Class 1 bikes (US designation, meaning maximum speed 20mph/aka approx. 32kmh) due to restrictions on some local bike trails that we intend to frequent.

1. Is the Como a good choice? Is there any other bike you would recommend much more highly than the Como for the purpose and ability to transport a child with modifications?

2. What child carrier is best? I'm leaning toward something from Thule, likely a Yepp. Will this carrier mount well on a Como? Alternatively, is a bike carrier significantly better, particularly from a safety standpoint? Does the Como have a kickstand that will prevent a child in a bike-mounted seat from being able to upset the bike, or can one be added as a modification?

3. Are there any "must-have" modifications or add-ons to the Como that I should be looking to purchase immediately?

4. We live in a fairly hot and dry climate. Do e-bikes suffer from performance issues in the heat? Current afternoon temperatures are in the low-mid 100sF (low 40sC). Are there any particular "must-have" pieces of gear or e-bike modifications for biking in such heat?

5. What should I be checking at time of purchase to ensure proper tuning and operation out of the gate?

Many thanks!
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
I love my Como 3 (class 1), but if you want to haul a kid regularly, I would look at the 4 or 5 level Como b/c of the much stronger motor and battery in the class 3 bikes . They are visually identical and dealers have been known to accidentally put a class 1 sticker on the bike or drop one in the box.
The Como 3 is a great bike, but borders on underpowered . my 2 cents
Edit I am neither a strong nor a skilled rider, and weigh 200 pounds.
 
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Dewey

Well-Known Member
The photos from Court’s review of the 2019 Como show a rear kickstand and frame molding around the bottom bracket and a thick chain stay that might prevent you using a chainstay bridge to mount a center dual kickstand. It does have rack bosses so you should be able to fit a rack that takes a Yepp seat, but you might prefer to tow a child trailer, then it won’t matter about the single kickstand.
 

LeakestWink

New Member
I love my Como 3 (class 1), but if you want to haul a kid regularly, I would look at the 4 or 5 level Como b/c of the much stronger motor and battery in the class 3 bikes . They are visually identical and dealers have been known to accidentally put a class 1 sticker on the bike or drop one in the box.
The Como 3 is a great bike, but borders on underpowered . my 2 cents
Edit I am neither a strong nor a skilled rider, and weigh 200 pounds.
Thanks; unfortunately, I don't want to either skirt regulations regarding the use of Class 3 bikes on trail, nor have to avoid those trails, as they are quite well-developed and extensive, and may be the primary place of use of the bikes. I am in reasonably good shape, though not an experienced cyclist, so I'm fairly sure that the extra assistance of a Class 1 e-bike will be sufficient; if I have to convert to a trailer for ergonomic or aerodynamic benefit with a weaker bike, I'm willing to do so.

Dewey said:
The photos from Court’s review of the 2019 Como show a rear kickstand and frame molding around the bottom bracket and a thick chain stay that might prevent you using a chainstay bridge to mount a center dual kickstand. It does have rack bosses so you should be able to fit a rack that takes a Yepp seat, but you might prefer to tow a child trailer, then it won’t matter about the single kickstand.
Thanks, that's a good piece of information. I'll probably consider a trailer a bit more strongly in that case.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove
Thanks; unfortunately, I don't want to either skirt regulations regarding the use of Class 3 bikes on trail, nor have to avoid those trails, as they are quite well-developed and extensive, and may be the primary place of use of the bikes. I am in reasonably good shape, though not an experienced cyclist, so I'm fairly sure that the extra assistance of a Class 1 e-bike will be sufficient; if I have to convert to a trailer for ergonomic or aerodynamic benefit with a weaker bike, I'm willing to do so.


Thanks, that's a good piece of information. I'll probably consider a trailer a bit more strongly in that case.
Your call on the sticker is probably wise ... but in that case I would look for a Giant or Treck or other bike that gives you the torque you'll need for heavy use without the speed of class 3 that Specialized bundles together. The are several to choose from from and all emtn bikes do a good job of low end torque. But your call.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Hello:

I am looking to buy a pair of e-bikes for myself and my wife for general fitness, activity, and sightseeing while also transporting our child, currently 13 mos. old. I have read good things about the Turbo Como, and there are some local shops that sell it. Before I buy, I wanted to run some questions by the community. Of note, I am restricting my search to Class 1 bikes (US designation, meaning maximum speed 20mph/aka approx. 32kmh) due to restrictions on some local bike trails that we intend to frequent.

1. Is the Como a good choice? Is there any other bike you would recommend much more highly than the Como for the purpose and ability to transport a child with modifications?

2. What child carrier is best? I'm leaning toward something from Thule, likely a Yepp. Will this carrier mount well on a Como? Alternatively, is a bike carrier significantly better, particularly from a safety standpoint? Does the Como have a kickstand that will prevent a child in a bike-mounted seat from being able to upset the bike, or can one be added as a modification?

3. Are there any "must-have" modifications or add-ons to the Como that I should be looking to purchase immediately?

4. We live in a fairly hot and dry climate. Do e-bikes suffer from performance issues in the heat? Current afternoon temperatures are in the low-mid 100sF (low 40sC). Are there any particular "must-have" pieces of gear or e-bike modifications for biking in such heat?

5. What should I be checking at time of purchase to ensure proper tuning and operation out of the gate?

Many thanks!
The Como is a great bike. Many posts speak very highly of it. With that said, @Art Deco has a valid point re motor torque. With dealers in you area I'd recommend test rides, with a load if you can. Perhaps a pack.

Being in my 70's I can't speak to modern child carriers except to say many posts seem to prefer trailers. They often require a through axle compatible hitch, but these are readily available.

As to temperature performance, I did a 32 mile ride today in temps that were often over 100°F. We live in a very hilly little town about an hour from you so it's not as warm here but it is much steeper. No problems at all, even when using Turbo on steeper hills. The motors do have over temperature limiters to prevent motor damage. The battery has a similar function in its BMS (battery management system). If anything does manage to get overheated it's self protecting.

Accessories right away? Water bottles all around. I used 3 today, with a mineral supplement for 2 of them. You'll also need a way to carry them. The Como battery pack has 1 set of frame inserts that can take 1 water bottle cage. There are a number of others options that your LBS can show you I'm sure.

A flat repair kit is a must, esp with the star thistle along sections of the trails near you. I carry a spare tube, tire levers, patch kit, tire boot, mini pump, CO2 inflator, and Grease Monkey wipes to clean up, all in a saddle bag. I also carry a bike mini tool that has the 5mm hex tool to remove the through axle. BTW - I also use tire liners/thorn strips in my tires to reduce flats. They work well for me. Others speak highly of using a tube sealant and other techniques.

I also carry at least one lock, depending on where I'm going. I have a frame mounted 'cafe' lock with a cable for short errands or when I'll be near the bike. I also have an Abus folding lock for when I'll be away from the bike. This includes a holder that can mount to frame inserts.

Based on our grandkids I'd also guess you're going to need some way to carry 'kid stuff' on at least one bike. A trailer might cover this need. Otherwise I'd suggest a rack that will accept panniers that meet your needs. I've used Ortlieb panniers for years. Great quality, and lots of styles available.

What to check when the bikes are delivered? This was recently discussed HERE. Seems fairly thorough.

Whatever your final choice, enjoy your new ebikes and in today's world, hold that child close to your hearts.