Supercharger 2

sl91

New Member
Another drawback with the RM ebike line (2020 and 2021 models) is the way how powertube bosch battery is covered. They use a kind of rubber that is mounted on the battery in such a way that even the dealer was not able to remove that cover in order to mount it on a new battery provided directly by Bosch. Bosch sent a new battery very quickly when I explained that my SC2 has been delivered with one useless battery. The dealer was obliged to take another battery with its cover directly from another RM new ebike in the shop. When neede, that means that one will not be able to buy a new battery found on the net at an interesting price (delivery 2 or 3 days, 565€ bike discount de) but will be obliged to order it from Riese and Muller using the dealer channel (several weeks almost 1000€ in france). This is an engineering mistake or....
By the way, the RX chip is not sold when ordering from France. I think that this is related to some regulation rules.

Regards

sl91
 

sl91

New Member
@sl91 that is a bit irksome - seen it on quiet a few R&Ms that come in for service - It's a just a steel rod that wasn't coated with a weather-proof paint. Luckily, it's not structural and is just there to keep the cables up and out of the way. If you're interested, it's a pretty plainless process to replace it with a piece of alloy tubing of the same diameter - you can find these at most hardware stores for cheap.
Do you think that this small part can be ordered alone from RM ? Is it easy to mount it by myself ?

Regards

sl91
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Do you think that this small part can be ordered alone from RM ? Is it easy to mount it by myself ?

Regards

sl91
Don't order the part. Figure out how to take it out. There is probably a retaining screw on one side that will allow you to push it out that side with some pliers. Get an accurate measurement of it, go to a hardware store and buy a short length of aluminum rode the same diameter, cut it to size and reinstall it. It will be way faster and way less expensive than having Riese & Muller send you a replacement that will rust all over again.
 

sl91

New Member
Don't order the part. Figure out how to take it out. There is probably a retaining screw on one side that will allow you to push it out that side with some pliers. Get an accurate measurement of it, go to a hardware store and buy a short length of aluminum rode the same diameter, cut it to size and reinstall it. It will be way faster and way less expensive than having Riese & Muller send you a replacement that will rust all over again.
Thank's. I will give it a try ! I will maybe buy directly a stainless steel rode.

Regards

sl91
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thank's. I will give it a try ! I will maybe buy directly a stainless steel rode.

Regards

sl91
I meant aluminum rod, not rode. Sorry about my fumble fingers. I have a band-aid on two of them from working on my bikes.
 

JVBulman

Active Member
Region
USA
Is there a threaded hole on one side the rod slides out of with a set screw to hold the rod in place?
Nah, it's installed more like a dowel and spins freely, if you pull apart the adjustable stem it falls right out.
 

JVBulman

Active Member
Region
USA
Do you think that this small part can be ordered alone from RM ? Is it easy to mount it by myself ?

Regards

sl91
It's definitely doable at home, but I strongly recommend using a torque-wrench and following the marked torque specs when you reassemble it for safety reasons.

You'll need to loosen the two hex bolts on the left side of the stem marked "11Nm" and "16Nm" as well as the four torx faceplate bolts to get the stem to move. If you loosen all this bolts and the stem doesn't budge, give the handlebars a firm shake, if it's still not moving, loosen the bolts a bit more and repeat. You shouldn't need to completely disassemble the stem to free the rod.

When putting it all back together, take note that the countersunk "nut" on the opposite side of the "16Nm" bolt is keyed, and the little triangle that's stamped on it should be perpendicular to the top face of the upper part of the stem.
 

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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
It's definitely doable at home, but I strongly recommend using a torque-wrench and following the marked torque specs when you reassemble it for safety reasons.

You'll need to loosen the two hex bolts on the left side of the stem marked "11Nm" and "16Nm" as well as the four torx faceplate bolts to get the stem to move. If you loosen all this bolts and the stem doesn't budge, give the handlebars a firm shake, if it's still not moving, loosen the bolts a bit more and repeat. You shouldn't need to completely disassemble the stem to free the rod.

When putting it all back together, take note that the countersunk "nut" on the opposite side of the "16Nm" bolt is keyed, and the little triangle that's stamped on it should be perpendicular to the top face of the upper part of the stem.
Darn it JV you really are a helpful guy. Are you with Dandelion? If so I might drop in at some point and say hay...after covid of course. I am up in B'ham.
 

sl91

New Member
Hi guys

Sorry for my very bad english language (not native language). What is the difference between a rod and a stem. For me it is the same part !

Regards

sl91
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Hi guys

Sorry for my very bad english language (not native language). What is the difference between a rod and a stem. For me it is the same part !

Regards

sl91
The rod is a long round piece of metal. Rod is what the small piece that is rusting that you want to replace is made of.. It is part of the stem which is the part of a bicycle that attaches the steering tube, coming out of the fork, to the handlebar.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Here is google's tranlation of my post into French. I speak fluent Spanish but only a limited amount of French so I cannot confirm the accuracy of the translation.

La tige est un long morceau de métal rond. La tige est ce dont est faite la petite pièce rouillée que vous voulez remplacer. Elle fait partie de la potence qui est la partie d'un vélo qui attache le tube de direction, sortant de la fourche, au guidon.
 

sl91

New Member
:) Thank's. As you can see, Google translate gives the same french word for both rod and stem (begining of each of the two first sentences.....strange
 

Paul_SD

New Member
Region
Europe
If you keep the chain clean and well lubricated, it will last longer. Investing 300-500 Eu in a decent work stand and some tools will help you keep the chain in good shape and get more life out of the chain and derailleur. I clean my chain after every 100-150 miles and have to change it out for a new on at 1000-1400 miles at which point I pull the cassette clean it thoroughly, along with the front chain ring and the derailleur cogs and reinstall and lube the whole drive train. I also change out the first two smallest cogs on the cassette every two chains and replace the whole cassette every four chains. I also check the brake pads every 500 miles and usually get between 2000-3000 miles out of the pads and twice that out of the rotors.

Before you actually need these things, it would be wise to source and purchase them now as many bike parts are hard to find these days while shipping is delayed almost everywhere. I would recommend you have on hand:
  1. 3 chains
  2. replacement cassette
  3. replacement two smallest cassette cog (likely 11&13 tooth- the ones with the fewest teeth wear out quickest)
  4. two sets of brake pads
  5. two break rotors
  6. replacement derailleur hanger
  7. replacement derailleur
  8. Pedro's BIke lust silicone bike wipe down
  9. Rolls of Blue paper shop towels

    There is a wealth of good instructional videos on youtube on doing all these tasks, some of the bet are by Park Tool, the Snap-on of bike tool companies, other good bike tool makers are Pedros and Bikehand (more of a discount brand).

    If you can find a corner of a garage or basement to set up a work station for your bike where the tools are handy and you have the right rags and fluids to keep you bike clean and smooth running, you will be glad you took the time and resources to set that up, A good radio or freestanding streaming speaker is a good thing to have in your shop along with a wall clock, as time can really get away from you when you're having fun giving your Pride & Joy the TLC she needs.

    I find with a dual battery bike that I like to have a second charger so that I can charge them both off the bike (or one off and the other in the bike).

    It is important to learn how to take off and put back on both the front and rear wheel and then learn to take off the tire, repair and/or the tube and put it all back together. If you practice this at home 3 or 4 times, it will take you only 15 minutes or so to doing it in the field when you get a flat. Being self reliant on these things take cycling up another level.
Thanks @Alaskan for the advise. Question on the chain. In the specs of the Superdelight it says Chain: KMC X11 (125x). What does the 125x means? Hopefully not the number of chain links, as the only KMC X11 I can find are with 114 links or 118 links.
 

Paul_SD

New Member
Region
Europe
Here is a 132 link KMC 11 Speed ebike specific chain that will do the job quite nicely. You will have to shorten it by a few links.

KMC e11Turbo EBike Chain 11Speed 136 Links Gray High Power Electric Bicycle https://ebay.us/eEmcOd
Sorry, I am quite new to chains, even if I use them already for about 40 years. Usually I did not pay attention to it and mostly used the chain and cassette until both where worn out completely. That worked for my last 2 bikes, 10 and 20 years old now. But now with my Superdelight I want to be more careful. What I learned so far:
  • KMC X11 found in the R&M spec means that it is for an eleven speed cassette.
  • The KMC e11 Turbo or Sport is actually meant for use on an e-bike with Bosch like the R&M bikes.
  • 125x is the number of links that you need.
So it was good that I did not buy any KMX X11 series as that would not have worked, as it does not have enough links and probably not strong enough for an e-bike.

Question: Is there a reason why R&M prefers KMC chains? Are there Shimano chains that would work well? For example the Shimano Steps E8000 E-BIke & E-MTB 11-Speed (138x)?
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
not strong enough for an e-bike.
That's just the marketing BS. You just need a chain for the proper number of speeds and with sufficient number of links.

Why KMC? Because R&M could source KMC chains at better wholesale price. Yes, you could use the Shimano chain you mentioned as well. Bear in mind that the Shimano chain is directional while the KMC is not.
 

Paul_SD

New Member
Region
Europe
That's just the marketing BS. You just need a chain for the proper number of speeds and with sufficient number of links.

Why KMC? Because R&M could source KMC chains at better wholesale price. Yes, you could use the Shimano chain you mentioned as well. Bear in mind that the Shimano chain is directional while the KMC is not.
Thanks @Stefan Mikes. One advantage of the Shimano chain is that it is on stock locally and KMC e11 is not.