Superdelite Framelock ?

Polivios

Member
Hello

I am a happy owner of a RM Superdelite :)
I am not convinced from the KIOX lock feature for protecting my bike during shortstops (while buying bread for example). Anyone can simply ride it whatever gear you have preselected ...

So far I am always taking out the ABUS Bordo and pass it through the wheel... but it is quite awkward and overkill for a two minute stop.

Considering to install a framelock like the ABUS-5750L obviously with same key as the one that comes with the bike... I am wondering if it will fit the frame of the Superdelite ?
Anybody has done this ?
Any thoughts ?

Thank you in advance

Polivios
 

Squaxor

Active Member
The Tinker has a frame lock which is okay to stop anyone from just jumping on and cycling off. The superdelite weighs 32.5Kg so nobody will easily carry it off.

I think the Bordo is a poor lock choice; It's not strong enough (silver rating) to use as the main lock and it's a heavy cafe lock. Neither beast nor fowl!

Frame locks are also good as it's difficult to get a tool in to remove the lock, although I'm sure skilled thieves can break any lock with the right tool and time.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
Polivios, I think the answer is No.

My R&M Homage has a similar Control Technology layout. I've tried to figure out how a frame lock could be fitted but every plan has been thwarted by the movement of the swing arm assembly. Such a pity!
David
 

Polivios

Member
Polivios, I think the answer is No.

My R&M Homage has a similar Control Technology layout. I've tried to figure out how a frame lock could be fitted but every plan has been thwarted by the movement of the swing arm assembly. Such a pity!
David


Hi David

Thanks for the reply
Dont know the details of homage model, but when I observe mine it seems that the "seatstays" connected to suspension head have enough space to mount a frame lock ..?
See the picture , do have the same setup ?

Polivios
back arm SD.jpg
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
Polivios
I suggest that you rig up a dummy frame lock – for example, zip tie a piece of hose in place – and then check whether it will strike anything when suspension is fully compressed.

Another issue to consider: on regular frames, frame locks are positioned inside the seat stays to prevent them from being removed. This is not possible on full suspension ebikes.
David
 

Mike Owen

Member
Polivios
I suggest that you rig up a dummy frame lock – for example, zip tie a piece of hose in place – and then check whether it will strike anything when suspension is fully compressed.

Another issue to consider: on regular frames, frame locks are positioned inside the seat stays to prevent them from being removed. This is not possible on full suspension ebikes.
David
Hi chaps. R&M already fit a frame lock to the Load which now has a similar swing arm to the Delite/Superdelite. Here’s a photo from the R&M website. Obviously it’s got extra brackets to take the lock, but it gives an idea of the thought they’ve already put into it. David, sounds like a great idea to mock it up first. Mike.


23B448E9-7A66-4C12-AE83-93392AAC344A.jpeg
 

aaronhamlin

New Member
Region
USA
City
Chicago, IL
Polivios, I think the answer is No.

My R&M Homage has a similar Control Technology layout. I've tried to figure out how a frame lock could be fitted but every plan has been thwarted by the movement of the swing arm assembly. Such a pity!
David
To add an extra confirmation to this, my local bike shop said that the R&M Superdelite couldn't support a frame lock and they also checked with the company. I really like frame locks as part of a bike security system, so this is really disappointing to me as well.
 

Paul_SD

New Member
Region
Europe
Frame locks are kind of useless in my point of view. At least where I live, in a country with more bikes than people and probably also the most stole bikes :-( A bike with a frame lock can be put in a (small) van or truck in less than 10 seconds, even if it weighs 32,5kg. I always lock my bike to something solid, even if I go only inside for a few seconds. My Superdelight I always lock with 2 locks. One through each wheel and the frame and connected to something solid. Using your Asus Brodo is unfortunately never an overkill. You will get faster at it. As this is an older threat, you might be faster at it by now.
 

aaronhamlin

New Member
Region
USA
City
Chicago, IL
Frame locks are kind of useless in my point of view. At least where I live, in a country with more bikes than people and probably also the most stole bikes :-( A bike with a frame lock can be put in a (small) van or truck in less than 10 seconds, even if it weighs 32,5kg. I always lock my bike to something solid, even if I go only inside for a few seconds. My Superdelight I always lock with 2 locks. One through each wheel and the frame and connected to something solid. Using your Asus Brodo is unfortunately never an overkill. You will get faster at it. As this is an older threat, you might be faster at it by now.
The key component of frame locks is that they are "part of a bike security system." That the frame lock necessitates extra effort to remove the bike after other layers of the bike's security have been breached means that the frame lock is playing its part. Good security in any fashion means adding layers of redundancy, particularly when they are largely independent of another.
 

MartsEbike

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
The Tinker has a frame lock which is okay to stop anyone from just jumping on and cycling off. The superdelite weighs 32.5Kg so nobody will easily carry it off.

I think the Bordo is a poor lock choice; It's not strong enough (silver rating) to use as the main lock and it's a heavy cafe lock. Neither beast nor fowl!

Frame locks are also good as it's difficult to get a tool in to remove the lock, although I'm sure skilled thieves can break any lock with the right tool and time.
The Abus Bordo 6500 has a Gold rating.... I have this lock and have found it to be very good.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
Good security in any fashion means adding layers of redundancy, particularly when they are largely independent of another.
Reminds me of the 3–2–1 rule for backing up computer data:
  • 3 copies (at least!)
  • 2 media types
  • 1 copy off-site
To this one add the Nike slogan: Just do it! And that is where the ever-present frame lock (with its optional plug-in chain or cable looped around a lamp post!) is so very appropriate.
 

sammcneill

Member
Region
New Zealand
I have a SC2 and use the Abus 6000A every time:


99% of time I lock to something physical but if going into a gas station or thr like where I have line of sight to bike, I’ll lock it through rear wheel to prevent a drive off! An ad hoc frame lock if you will.

lock is quick and easy but alarm is not as loud as I would have hoped for

cheers
Sam
 

TimJohn

Active Member
I have installed a cheap Amazon alarm and quick release pedals but never, ever leave it out of line of site or sound (alarm). The NYON software lock is a waste of time. In the 6 months that I have owned my Mulitcharger I have only seen one R&M ebike and at that it didn't have a NYON display. But to state the obvious, I can't imagine someone who could afford and $10K bike that would have another NYON would be into the theft of R&M bikes. Just saying.
 

sammcneill

Member
Region
New Zealand
Whilst I am nervous about theft, I've worked under the premise of simply trying to make my bike harder to steal than the one next to it.... the audible alarmed lock is a big part of that strategy, as is parking in brightly lit places, highly public/visible places as well. (if you want to realise that basically ANY lock is not safe then watch the Lock Picking Lawyers YouTube series and look for your model! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCm9K6rby98W8JigLoZOh6FQ)

Where possible, I try to use the free Locky Dock service that is in my city:


These are brilliant and claim to never have had a theft from them when used correctly. Interestingly, they allow you to charge your bike whilst there, although I'd never leave my Bosch charger there and walk away.... perhaps good if you were touring and in the city and needed a top up whilst you ate lunch in line of sight perhaps?

Ultimately, in my view ithese bikes are there to be ridden - our SC2 is a second vehicle replacement and if it can't go where I need to go and for me to feel confident that it is as secure as I need it to be, it starts to become a bit redundant! If the worst happens, the bike is insured and whilst it may take a fair amount of time to get a replacement R&M, that's what insurance is for (interestingly, my insurer www.mas.co.nz didn't really care for any special requirements around insurance - we simply had to list it and the buy price (NZD$10K for floor model SC2) - your mileage with your insurer may vary of course....)

The last word: I went to pick up a Wahoo fan for my indoor bike trainer (getting very hot in the garage) and took the SC2.... the box was unfortunately larger than I anticipated., but I was still able to (just) strap it to the back with 2x bungy cords and then hold it with one hand over my shoulder to get it home the 6km from the store.

This is precisely the type of trip I want a super versatile bike to be able to accomplish for me and the locking side of things has to play into that strategy.
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David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
I shift my Rohloff into gear 14, then take the display with me.

No one will realistically be able to peddle the bike that way.
Brilliant: I'm a convert!

No opportunist swindler would be able to peddle my Homage Rohloff to a naïve buyer in that condition!
 
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2dogs

New Member
Region
Australia
Great idea, I ducked into a store that other day without locking it as I was only 10 feet away. Could not keep my eyes off the bike, felt like I was being rude to the shopkeeper. Next time I'm doing this. I am paranoid but for the quick visits you've saved me using the Extreme Abus & the New York Fahgettaboudit, combined they are really heavy.

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peterh_nz

Member
Region
New Zealand
When I want to run in a store (within eyesight of the bike) for a minute, I shift my Rohloff into gear 14, then take the display with me. No one will realistically be able to peddle the bike away that way, and if they are just pushing the bike away, they can't really outrun anyone.
Along with other measures, I usually leave my E14 in first gear, minus the controller of course.

Have wondered if 14th or 1st gear is better at slowing a ride-away.

After a simple experiment I found that in 14th gear it didn't take as long as I had thought to be able get up to speed and a get-away is then almost assured. In 1st gear, instantly peddling flat out is not fast and is exhausting, so a thief with bike could fairly easily be out run.

It seems to me that both approaches have advantages: slow start then fast getaway or fast start but slow getaway.

Interesting.

Peter
 
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TimJohn

Active Member
Thats a very good idea but I thought putting it into the tallest gear would make a start more difficult with a slow take off.