Suspension seat post - Kinekt

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
I had a Kinekt on my Pedego RidgeRider and like it a lot. I was thinking of selling my RR, so I put the Kinekt on my wife's Pedego Commuter so she could try it out.
After thinking about it for a bit I decided to keep the RidgeRider, but my wife won't give me back my Kinekt. :confused:

This time around I thought I'd try the Suntour. I'll have to see how it compares to the Kinekt.
Please post your thoughts on the Suntour, especially after comparing it to the Kinect.
Cheers to your wife for keeping the Kinect! Lol 😃😉
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
One advantage of suspension seat post that came to mind is for short rides (errands, grocery runs) I don’t need to wear any types of padded bike short or chamois.
For longer rides I still like to wear them.
 

Sierratim

Member
We use Suntour NCX suspension seat posts on our Cannondale Quick mechanicals. These bikes have narrower tires and no shocks so the seat posts make a noticable difference in comfort.

We got these online I think through bike24. Their current price is ~$56 + flat rate shipping (no sales tax). We ordered a number of items so the shipping worked out to just a few $ per item putting the shocks at under $60 delivered. They even came with the neoprene dust covers.

With the wider lower pressure tires and the front shocks we've elected not to go with suspension seat posts on our Vado 5's. My wife did change her saddle to her favorite women's specific saddle by WTB. I found the standard Specialized saddle to be quite comfortable even riding without padded shorts up to ~15 miles. More than that and I make sure I have padding!
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thanks Marci jo. I agree that they are good responding to questions as I asked few questions on late Friday and they quickly came back with answer.
I think feeling bouncy might be as a result of moving from a rigid post to a suspension post which could require some getting used to.
I will be experimenting with adjustments and possible spring change.
will be updating you with progress.
I am 187 and am using the black spring which supposed to be good for up to 200 pounds. Probably still OK to stay with the same spring and adjust the preload a bit. Will see...
Thanks again for your valuable input.
Try using the black short spring and the orange long one. Also get a helper, sit on the saddle and have the helper tighten the preload to the point where it takes up the slack and meets the sag, where the seat doesn't come back up when you stand on the pedals and doesn't move down when sit on it. This will eliminate most, if not all the bounce. The range of motion will be reduced, but you will be in or near the sweet spot for maximum comfort effect. Then you ban tighten or loosen in small increments to dial things in.
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
Ok experts. Call me crazy!
I am now fairly used to the Kinekt seat post and notice that I stay on the seat longer and more comfortable.
here is the kicker. I have noticed my neck is tense and achey. Not sure at all if it has anything to do with the new seat post but might be due to the new set up.
I have the seat higher than before by about an inch to accommodate for the sagging of the new post. I also had the tilt of the seat by 2 degrees forward (nose of the seat lower).
I wonder if the new setup promotes leaning more on handlebar hence more pressure on shoulders and neck?
I adjusted the tilt to its normal (flatter), and brought the seat down an inch in the middle of the ride yesterday.
I was very sore in the neck and back area last night.
will be riding today and will update.
sorry to bother you all this but just want to share my experience and see if anyone else has similar situation.
btw I just started swimming again for the bad knee and all this could be as a result of swim strokes. Haha I had to add this to throw you off.
 

Sierratim

Member
It all comes down to getting the best bike fit that works for you.

Raising the saddle a full inch is a big change. Does the saddle drop that much when you're just sitting (no road bumps, etc)? How's your leg extension? You want the saddle height to allow nearly full extension at the bottom of the pedal stroke. This gets max power without risking over extension. With the saddle too low not only do you not get max power from each stroke but it can aggravate knee pain. I've noticed that changes of as little as 1/4 inch in saddle height make a noticable difference for me.

Saddle position is next. You want the saddle adjusted front to back to put your knee cap over the center of the pedal when your stroke is horizontal. The ball of your foot should be over the pedal axle though this is a estimate with the standard platform pedals. I use clipless pedals (the ones with the clips, go figure) except when riding in town. They guarantee the correct foot position, allow me to use up-strokes for more power and keep my legs in the cockpit when the bike inevitably goes over. All good things. They are also recommended by my knee doc to help strengthen the muscles around my damaged knee (torn ACL) and my other artificial knee. It works for me. More strength, less pain, better hill climbing, less chance of injury in a fall.

Dropping the saddle angle 2deg might relieve some pressure at the nose. Generally speaking you want the saddle just about level (the Specialized Como saddle is an exception). As long as you don't find yourself gradually sliding forward during the ride a small adjustment from level should be fine. If the angle is too low the tendency to slide forward will increase the pressure on your hands contributing to numbness.

You may want to look at handle bar height. I usually end up raising the bars with a higher angle stem. I haven't found this necessary on my Vado 5. There's a post in the New Vado 5 thread that has specifics on actually changing out the handle bar to get a 50mm rise in position. If you're feeling more than just nominal pressure on your hands you might want to consider this.

Finally, I'd consider upgrading the grips. The same post in the New Vado 5 thread has a pic showing the owner's Vado with Ergon GP3 grips. I use these as well. When properly adjusted they help relieve numbness, esp for those of us with carpel tunnel.

There are a number of videos that go through these and more bike fit techniques. Your LBS probably offers a bike fit service as well. Check 'em out.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
It all comes down to getting the best bike fit that works for you.

You may want to look at handle bar height. I usually end up raising the bars with a higher angle stem. I haven't found this necessary on my Vado 5. There's a post in the New Vado 5 thread that has specifics on actually changing out the handle bar to get a 50mm rise in position. If you're feeling more than just nominal pressure on your hands you might want to consider this.

Finally, I'd consider upgrading the grips. The same post in the New Vado 5 thread has a pic showing the owner's Vado with Ergon GP3 grips. I use these as well. When properly adjusted they help relieve numbness, esp for those of us with carpel tunnel.

There are a number of videos that go through these and more bike fit techniques. Your LBS probably offers a bike fit service as well. Check 'em out.
Good advice all around... just make sure that the Ergon grips are rotated so that they form a 150' angle from horizontal for proper wrist alignment.

Along with raising the overall bar height... you may also want to consider ergonomic handlebars for better comfort and alignment of the Carpal tunnel.



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Nxkharra

Active Member
It all comes down to getting the best bike fit that works for you.

Raising the saddle a full inch is a big change. Does the saddle drop that much when you're just sitting (no road bumps, etc)? How's your leg extension? You want the saddle height to allow nearly full extension at the bottom of the pedal stroke. This gets max power without risking over extension. With the saddle too low not only do you not get max power from each stroke but it can aggravate knee pain. I've noticed that changes of as little as 1/4 inch in saddle height make a noticable difference for me.

Saddle position is next. You want the saddle adjusted front to back to put your knee cap over the center of the pedal when your stroke is horizontal. The ball of your foot should be over the pedal axle though this is a estimate with the standard platform pedals. I use clipless pedals (the ones with the clips, go figure) except when riding in town. They guarantee the correct foot position, allow me to use up-strokes for more power and keep my legs in the cockpit when the bike inevitably goes over. All good things. They are also recommended by my knee doc to help strengthen the muscles around my damaged knee (torn ACL) and my other artificial knee. It works for me. More strength, less pain, better hill climbing, less chance of injury in a fall.

Dropping the saddle angle 2deg might relieve some pressure at the nose. Generally speaking you want the saddle just about level (the Specialized Como saddle is an exception). As long as you don't find yourself gradually sliding forward during the ride a small adjustment from level should be fine. If the angle is too low the tendency to slide forward will increase the pressure on your hands contributing to numbness.

You may want to look at handle bar height. I usually end up raising the bars with a higher angle stem. I haven't found this necessary on my Vado 5. There's a post in the New Vado 5 thread that has specifics on actually changing out the handle bar to get a 50mm rise in position. If you're feeling more than just nominal pressure on your hands you might want to consider this.

Finally, I'd consider upgrading the grips. The same post in the New Vado 5 thread has a pic showing the owner's Vado with Ergon GP3 grips. I use these as well. When properly adjusted they help relieve numbness, esp for those of us with carpel tunnel.

There are a number of videos that go through these and more bike fit techniques. Your LBS probably offers a bike fit service as well. Check 'em out.
Great writ up. Thanks.
 

MarkF

Active Member
I have the NCX seatpost and going from nothing to this, it's been great. Highly recommend them if your on a budget. I have no doubts the Kinect is better at picking up the smaller bumps. But I too had neck and back pain at first. The fix was raising my handlebars so I wasn't leaning forward as much.
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
I have the NCX seatpost and going from nothing to this, it's been great. Highly recommend them if your on a budget. I have no doubts the Kinect is better at picking up the smaller bumps. But I too had neck and back pain at first. The fix was raising my handlebars so I wasn't leaning forward as much.
MarkF, was your neck pain due to the Kinekt seat post in general and getting used to It, or position of the seat and handlebar? Did it go away?
 

MarkF

Active Member
Had to do with leaning forward to much and nothing to do with the seat post. But I did raise my seat when I got mine so that is why I needed to raise my bars.
 

Nxkharra

Active Member
Had to do with leaning forward to much and nothing to do with the seat post. But I did raise my seat when I got mine so that is why I needed to raise my bars.
Good to know. Thanks. I think I have the same issue.
Vado handlebar? Is this what you have?
 
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