Suspension seat post vs suspension fork

Operator7

Active Member
I have a question...

As I'm still in the process of researching which ebike to purchase, it has recently been pointed out to me, the fact that most of a bike rider's weight is on the peddles and handlebars, and not on the actual seat (unless it is a cruiser style bike). With this in mind, suspension seat posts might not be very helpful (said by some). On the other hand, much of the rider's weight is on the handlebars and fork, for which a suspension fork would be much more useful (said by some).

As I ponder a bike like ST1 versus a Haibike, the Haibike has a suspension fork and the ST1 does not. The ST1 does have big tires which are supposed to help cushion the ride.

Would love to hear any and all feedback, no matter what your viewpoint.

thanks
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
For a really cush ride you could get full suspension, or you could also consider a fat tire bike. In fact, you really should test ride both of those options!
 

Mike Smith

Active Member
I would recommend both as there are times when both are useful. Would recommend getting the front suspension, with lockout feature stock, then adding the suspension seatpost of your choice. I have the BodyFloat and love it but it is a the top end of the price range and i honestly didn't test Suntour or Thudbuster but many people swear by them. Also don't discount your saddle, find one that works best for you and it will make a big difference in comfort. I love my Brooks pre-aged saddle and never thought I could use leather saddle, but there are hundreds of choices out there. Have fun customizing!
 

Operator7

Active Member
Mike, had you ridden your bike with a non-suspension seatpost, prior to upgrading to Body Float? Curious to hear the difference (from you or others).

And there is no way to get suspension fork for ST1 is there?
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
These are suspension forks available for ST1.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists) (Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Buy a bike with a suspension fork to begin with, the manufacturers get these parts for far less than you're going to have to pay.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Get both seat-post and suspension right from the get go! At my age and the amount I ride I need both. I tried to do without the seat-post and didn't like that.
 

Mike Smith

Active Member
Mike, had you ridden your bike with a non-suspension seatpost, prior to upgrading to Body Float? Curious to hear the difference (from you or others).

And there is no way to get suspension fork for ST1 is there?

Yes I rode for a while with the stock saddle and seatpost but it is what you would expect, a little hard on the buttocks on rough surfaces. The right suspension seat post and saddle make for a much smoother and more enjoyable ride, even on paved roads or trails, which feel much rougher at 20 to 25 mph. If you can get the suspension fork with the bike definitely do it an save the hassle and expense later. The saddle and seat post is an easy install once you decide on what you like. Watch some you tube videos on suspension seat posts and you will see how they insulate your body from the road, it it moves and takes the bumps while your butt stays still for the most part.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
The Stromer fork is a cheap suntour, which while adequate for street use, is pretty basic. For what you'll pay them for OE you could buy a much better Rockshox or Fox fork, but I don't know if they do any custom fitting. The stock fork isn't "rigid" like a steel fork, it's a high quality carbon fiber fork that is very light and absorbs quite a bit of energy. Along with the Big Ben tires run at the low end of the their spec (no matter with boost) it's a very nice ride.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
The stock fork isn't "rigid" like a steel fork, it's a high quality carbon fiber fork that is very light and absorbs quite a bit of energy. Along with the Big Ben tires run at the low end of the their spec (no matter with boost) it's a very nice ride

Why then, the aftermarket suspension seatposts? I know the answer is "for comfort", and everyone is different, but doesn't the popularity of suspension seatposts for this brand indicate that the stock bike is somewhat lacking in comfort?
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Why then, the aftermarket suspension seatposts? I know the answer is "for comfort", and everyone is different, but doesn't the popularity of suspension seatposts for this brand indicate that the stock bike is somewhat lacking in comfort?


Not really. I can tell you after 25+ years of cycling forums that a vast majority will automatically default to "you need this" when in fact most don't. ;)
And that where your ride and the condition of the roads or trails is so completely different from your area to mine as to be irrelevant honestly.
If you ride on rough roads at high speeds you do need good suspension (not Suntour fork!) and a seatpost shock.
If you ride on smooth paved bike trails you don't need anything if you utilize your tires as they were intended. (varying psi to suit conditions and terrain)
And then I might be twice as "gimpy" (sore stuff) as you so I need it and you don't.
Finally biking is by nature going to hurt to whatever degrees, again, tolerance from person to person, weight, bike fit, etc etc etc

Most bikers run their tires at max psi, to be as fast as possible. (much less difference than most think when peddling alone)
With an Ebike it's completely irrelevant and the amount of comfort it can add makes it completely silly to run a hard (max psi) tire on an Ebike.
And then there's the better traction at less psi.......

REALLY easy to prove or disprove. Pump up your tires to the max rated psi shown on the sidewall info. Take gauge with you. Ride over the roughest part of your ride, or do your whole ride if it's not too long to do twice. Then take out air to the minimum recommended psi and do the same section or same ride.
Let me know if you say "Wow" out loud, or just think it. ;)

I run Big Apples on my tadpole trike and the difference between 35psi (min) and 55psi (max) is unreal in comfort.
Same with the Big Bens on the ST1. Effect is greater by far with these fatty balloon tires, but it works with ALL tires to differing degrees.

I'm not saying you or anyone else doesn't need suspension. Some absolutely do. Only you and your situation know that. Just that these blanket "you need this" idea doesn't apply if you really think it through. ;)

https://www.electricbike.com/stromer-st1-2013/ Toward the end of the review he talks about the fork and the ride quality.
 
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Operator7

Active Member
Thanks for the feedback!

Can anyone here quantify or describe in their own words, the difference in ride between the carbon fork and the Suntour suspension fork?
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Most bikers run their tires at max psi, to be as fast as possible. (much less difference than most think when peddling alone)
With an Ebike it's completely irrelevant and the amount of comfort it can add makes it completely silly to run a hard (max psi) tire on an Ebike.
And then there's the better traction at less psi.......

Comfort aside, and all other things being equal, does running an ebike's tires at the low end of the psi specified for the tire use more battery to keep the bike at the same speed as when running the tires at higher psi?
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Comfort aside, and all other things being equal, does running an ebike's tires at the low end of the psi specified for the tire use more battery to keep the bike at the same speed as when running the tires at higher psi?

Yes, because lower tire pressure equals more rolling resistance, therefore your legs and the battery will have to work a little harder for the same outcome.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Don't bother with a suspension seat post ... Buy a nice gel seat, or suspension seat if you must.. Then see how it feels.

The suntour fork on the Stromer is a pos. However, if you're strictly on road or bike paths it should hold up.

I've owned my stromer elite for 2 years 3o00 miles... suggestions:

Use asymmetric tire pressures: say 40 psig in the front 50 in the back.. you may have to adust as needed. There's a Google App to help you.
Use a gel seat or equivalent.
Don't know how the carbon fork works. I have the suntour and have to play with the cylinder pressure and watch it...

And if you're not in a rush, wait until October or so and by a leftover model.. Negotiate hard with the dealer, their markups are huge.