Swapping MD21 rims for MD35 on Trekking 5.0 S

RoadWrinkle

Active Member
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Love the wider Alexrims MD35 rims with the Schwalbe Super Moto X, 62-584 (27.5 x 2.4") tires on the 2017 XDURO Trekking 4.0, but want the Bosch speed performance line 350w motor on the Trekking 5.0 S. The 5.0 S has the Alexrims MD21 with Schwalbe Energizer Pro (28" x 1.5") tires and was wondering if anyone knows about any clearance issues with swapping out the 28" MD21's for the 27.5" MD35's. Has anyone put a little wider rim/tire on their Haibike Trekking?
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
View attachment 16571 View attachment 16572 Love the wider Alexrims MD35 rims with the Schwalbe Super Moto X, 62-584 (27.5 x 2.4") tires on the 2017 XDURO Trekking 4.0, but want the Bosch speed performance line 350w motor on the Trekking 5.0 S. The 5.0 S has the Alexrims MD21 with Schwalbe Energizer Pro (28" x 1.5") tires and was wondering if anyone knows about any clearance issues with swapping out the 28" MD21's for the 27.5" MD35's. Has anyone put a little wider rim/tire on their Haibike Trekking?

I commute on Haibike Trekking S Rx (28mph, 2016 model).
I can take upto 2" wide tires with the same fenders but you can go upto 2.2 by changing the fenders. Uses the std 28" / 700C wheels.

The new Trekking 4.0 you linked uses the 20mph, CX motor but comes with 27.5" wheels and because they spec'd 2.4" tires, they are using MD35 rims. They are heavier and using them on a Trekking S 5.0 means that you have to use a new hub because the Speed version uses QC whereas the Trekking 4.0 Bosch CX version uses thru-axle. Also, you will have to lace the wheel with new spokes, find a new hub etc. Just too much work.
I really wish most bikes came with thru-axle systems.

You may want to wait till September because few major companies are launching S-pedelecs with dual battery options and 2.4" tires.
 
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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Sounds interesting... If I had to buy again, I'd definitely get a dual battery. I can see several advantages:

- Both batteries are securely fastened and locked down. No need to carry around a second battery in your pannier or in a bag.
- The batteries are discharged alternatively in small percentage increments. This means that the discharge rate is slower for both batteries, which increases their lifespan.
- Both batteries are recharged at the same time. No need to have 2 chargers.
- Doubling the capacity means you'll have sufficient range for unexpected trips during the day.
- More battery capacity would make the bike easier to ride in spring time when it's windy (more use of Turbo mode).
- An S-Pedelec really needs more battery capacity if you live in a hilly and windy area.

I was extremely tempted to buy the dual battery R&M Charger GX but decided against it because it was too heavy (I need to carry the bike up a flight of stairs). If Haibike puts the dual battery system on the Trekking series, I'd probably sell my current e-bike and switch. I'm surprised it has taken e-bike manufacturers so much time to follow R&M's lead.

I agree. Most S-pedelecs should have at least 750Whr battery.
Riese and Muller were not the first to introduce the concept of Dual battery. There were others like BH and Gepida, but they did not bring into the market for various reasons. R&M are certainly great bikes but they are heavy because of all the extra suspension and heavy frame built to accommodate the extra battery. They are clearly marketing their products well.

Gepida is an Hungarian company and most Bosch motors are produced in Hungary. They had an interesting heavy-duty cargo bike for display at the last year's Eurobike. I am not sure if it's available for sale.


Zemo had some very interesting bikes and I think you shared it first ... (Link Removed - No Longer Exists)
 

RoadWrinkle

Active Member
you have to use a new hub because the Speed version uses QC whereas the Trekking 4.0 Bosch CX version uses thru-axle
I know the 2017 5.o has 15x100 thru axle at the fork but was not aware the rear hub was QC, I just assumed the rear XLC EVO hub was 12x148 thru axle as well. Thanks for the great information. I like to have assist up to 28 mph but its not crucial ( and of course there are several methods to defeat the speed limiter), but I am more interested in having a 350w motor vs. 250w CX, even though it has more torque and a higher top assist %.
 
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