Switching to the Allant + 7S

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Hey guys, I had another question on making the transition (bike still isn't here yet but just preparing)...

On the verve it has something called a toe guard and a slap guard but what are these for exactly, and should I be getting some put on the allant? Is this the big plastic piece that covers the chain?

Also, What's the difference between a chain stay, and a chain guide? It seems like overkill to have all 3 right?

Sorry for all the noobie questions and thanks!
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
The chain guard on the Allant has proven to be satisfactorily
Thanks Sparky! That's what I was wondering. There's a lot of products out there, and it's hard to know what's needed or even useful.

I google and YouTube a lot, but bike parts seem to be something you can't find good answers to - on some things.

Thanks again!
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I thought the original derailleur was minimally matched to the rigors required. Understandably, manufacturers try to maintain a price and profit point for their products. In doing so, there is a risk that components may wear out earlier than should be expected. The original chain is one more example.
Based on what?
 

Sparky731

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Madison, WI
I would say based upon personal experience. Granted, per my more aggressive riding style & daily mileage I may skew the average mean-time-to-failure stats. However, given the significant difference between the two motors (Speed vs. CX) it is my contention that Trek should have used the same drive components on the 7s as used on the 8s — which I have upgraded to.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I would say based upon personal experience. Granted, per my more aggressive riding style & daily mileage I may skew the average mean-time-to-failure stats. However, given the significant difference between the two motors (Speed vs. CX) it is my contention that Trek should have used the same drive components on the 7s as used on the 8s — which I have upgraded to.
Ok…guess I’m missing the problem you’re having.
 

Sparky731

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Madison, WI
Not having a problem any longer since I upgraded components. Although, only time and miles will tell how long these will last.
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I would say based upon personal experience. Granted, per my more aggressive riding style & daily mileage I may skew the average mean-time-to-failure stats. However, given the significant difference between the two motors (Speed vs. CX) it is my contention that Trek should have used the same drive components on the 7s as used on the 8s — which I have upgraded to.
Is there really a difference between the Speed and CX Bosch motors? Or is it just a software difference? I have my suspicions....but does anyone really know?
 

Sparky731

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Madison, WI
Educational for me, I found quite a bit of printed info comparing CX & Speed motors.
I will now say that Trek under-spec’d the drive train for the 7 and the 7s.
 

Sparky731

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Madison, WI
Do you mean that it should be listed as higher than they say it is, or that it's an underpowered drive train and I should upgrade it?
No need to upgrade until the parts wear out. My point is they may wear out sooner than they should. Trek was trying to keep the purchase cost down with cheaper parts.
 

Sparky731

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Madison, WI
Yes, you say a lot based on nothing.
Based on “nothing”? I don’t understand. What I learned was the CX has greater torque at lower speeds, the Speed has more torque at higher speeds. Both motors produce a huge amount of power. It is my belief that Trek should have matched the motors to higher-end drive components equivalent to other bikes with the same motors. These “7” components are much too integral to the mobility of the bike to be under-spec’d leading to a shorter MTBF.
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Hey guys! First day on the new bike! Overall I'm loving the allant! It's what I wanted but just didn't know it. I had a couple questions though if anyone knows

1. The allant has an angled riding position different than the verve. My wrists really hurt and I had to have my hands locked out to reach the handlebars. I was also hunched over.

My take is to get a stem that isn't flat to raise and angle the handlebars. What do you guys think?

2. I'm pretty short and find it hard to mount, even with the seatpost all the way down (same suspension post as the verve). I really need a suspension post so my question is- should I get a dropper? How hard are they to mount?

Overall wonderful experience! Motor wasn't too laud and the power is amazing!

Thanks guys, and I appreciate all your help you guys have given me!
 

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retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Did you have your bike properly fitted at the bike shop? Sounds like the frame is too large for you. That would account for both the riding angle and the difficulty in mounting the bike, especially given that the seat post is all the way down. I'd go back to the bike shop...
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Did you have your bike properly fitted at the bike shop? Sounds like the frame is too large for you. That would account for both the riding angle and the difficulty in mounting the bike, especially given that the seat post is all the way down. I'd go back to the bike shop...
I never thought about that. They didn't fit me or anything and I didn't know it was a thing. Maybe I will go ask them. The one problem is I'm already in a small frame so I don't know if they can do anything or not.

It sucks being short lol
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
I never thought about that. They didn't fit me or anything and I didn't know it was a thing. Maybe I will go ask them. The one problem is I'm already in a small frame so I don't know if they can do anything or not.

It sucks being short lol
Get the Bontrager stem riser that @Dallant recommended earlier in the thread.

Also, I noticed your grips are parallel if not tilted slightly downward. Rotate them up further (towards the sky), this should eliminate the wrist pain together with the adjustable stem riser you should get.

You’re putting to much of your forward weight on your wrists because the frame is slightly too big for you. It’s the smallest size the allant is available in so with the few aforementioned tweaks it should be much more comfortable for you.

When you are on the saddle can you atleast touch the ground with the tip of your shoes? If yes that’s ok.
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Thanks for the advice! I'll buy the stem raiser and tilt the handlebars up more.


When you are on the saddle can you atleast touch the ground with the tip of your shoes? If yes that’s ok.
So I'm my other trek bikes I've been able to with the small frames. The allant, in not able to. I have three staggered so I have to hop down to stand. The verve I could do the tippy-toes.

Is there a way to raise the bars (using the stem raiser) and still make it look natural? Havnt used one before
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
There is also a Bontrager adjustable handlebar stem (part #5264268) that your dealer can order that can help you sit more upright. We put one on my wife’s Allant+7 and it made all the difference.
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