Switching to the Allant + 7S

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
There is also a Bontrager adjustable handlebar stem (part #5264268) that your dealer can order that can help you sit more upright. We put one on my wife’s Allant+7 and it made all the difference.
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Actually I think there’s a cheaper one than this that does not have the cable routing part in front. My wife’s Allant doesn’t ever use that part so it’s not necessary.
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Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Thanks for the advice! I'll buy the stem raiser and tilt the handlebars up more.



So I'm my other trek bikes I've been able to with the small frames. The allant, in not able to. I have three staggered so I have to hop down to stand. The verve I could do the tippy-toes.

Is there a way to raise the bars (using the stem raiser) and still make it look natural? Havnt used one before
If it feels natural to you it is natural.

Don’t worry about the looks, ignore the roadies and their back breaking set-ups. The roadie/lycra crowd has a very short shelf life, by 40 years old they all look for risers, adjustable stems, wider tires, cushioned saddles, and now the battery and motor (e-bike).

I’m sure the Bontrager riser can take atleast 5mm of spacers to make it even more upright and manageable.

The allant model line has a notorious high stand-over height. Even if your feet don’t touch the ground on the toes it’s still ok. Not ideal but ok. Not a deal breaker by any means.

To dismount easily tilt the bike one way to the side either to the left or to the right (whichever is more natural for you) plant on the ground the foot on the downward tilted side and swing your other leg over the saddle.
 
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TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Only real concern is cable length. Make sure they aren’t pulled when the riser is added. Your LBS could add length I guess.
you are an expert on bikes... you pretty much nailed it on this - My LBS had to reroute the cables through the frame and everything. they said it added a lot more height. I'm also thinking now of getting rid of the suspension seat post to get the extra 3 inches of length down on the seat post. I hope it doesn't make it too bumpy though - I really liked the way it handled last time I was out.

PS I've got a great idea for someone that is good at DIY, for those with the range extender if we had like a water bottle holder that could clip into the battery holder - when we take out the 2nd battery... that would be so nice :)
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
If it feels natural to you it is natural.

Don’t worry about the looks, ignore the roadies and their back breaking set-ups. The roadie/lycra crowd has a very short shelf life, by 40 years old they all look for risers, adjustable stems, wider tires, cushioned saddles, and now the battery and motor (e-bike).

I’m sure the Bontrager riser can take atleast 5mm of spacers to make it even more upright and manageable.

The allant model line has a notorious high stand-over height. Even if your feet don’t touch the ground on the toes it’s still ok. Not ideal but ok. Not a deal breaker by any means.

To dismount easily tilt the bike one way to the side either to the left or to the right (whichever is more natural for you) plant on the ground the foot on the downward tilted side and swing your other leg over the saddle.
Thank you for your post! I feel better now. It's hard being a little shorter, so it's good to hear the assurance that I can still be a trail runner without the formalities. The allant is a really fun bike!
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
you are an expert on bikes... you pretty much nailed it on this - My LBS had to reroute the cables through the frame and everything. they said it added a lot more height. I'm also thinking now of getting rid of the suspension seat post to get the extra 3 inches of length down on the seat post. I hope it doesn't make it too bumpy though - I really liked the way it handled last time I was out.

PS I've got a great idea for someone that is good at DIY, for those with the range extender if we had like a water bottle holder that could clip into the battery holder - when we take out the 2nd battery... that would be so nice :)
I’m certainly no expert. We went through this with my wife’s Allant+7 and that was my Trek guy’s concern. Fortunately, his installation/adjustment of the stem was just right for her and no cable changes were needed.
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Hey Guys, another question on the Allant: So I notice the peddles don't rotate backwards at all. What is the best way to lube the chain after each ride, if the chain wont rotate?
 
Hey Guys, another question on the Allant: So I notice the peddles don't rotate backwards at all. What is the best way to lube the chain after each ride, if the chain wont rotate?
I use a bike stand, but if it is just a quick c;lean/lube and nothing else then I do the visible bit of the chain at the bottom, then lift the back wheel a bit and rotate the pedal. This is easy to do if you tand at the back of the bike facing forwards - you can still reach the chain. If you try to crouch at the side of the bike and lift the rear wheel it is much harder!
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Hey Guys, another question on the Allant: So I notice the peddles don't rotate backwards at all. What is the best way to lube the chain after each ride, if the chain wont rotate?
I turn my Allant upside down with my bar ends keeping it up off the Purion display. That way I can peddle the bike chain through my Park chain cleaner. It’s awkward but it works.
 

Nwtravler

Member
Region
USA
Take an Allen wrench and put it on the drive sprocket the turn the crank back until it contacts the Allen. Turn the crank back and the drive train will rotate back for lubing.
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Take an Allen wrench and put it on the drive sprocket the turn the crank back until it contacts the Allen. Turn the crank back and the drive train will rotate back for lubing.
Im going to try this when i get back from the trails today! Thanks for the tip :)
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Hey guys, I just got back from riding and need some advice. I'm still trying to adjust things correctly. I noticed this time that my thighs come up too far and so im thinking again about putting on a suspension seatpost or raising the one i have on now. also the handlebars were better but I think need them closer to my body still and a little bit higher.

one problem i have is the part over the frame that tightens the seatpost is stiped I think. Are these easy to get and do they have to be stock in order to work correctly or can i just get one off of amazon?

Thanks for helping me with all this guys! It's slowly coming together. I think because my knees were rotating up to high, i had a hard time with a fluid motion while pedaling. I think raising the seat and handle bars a tad will help this. I might also get grippier pedals.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Hey guys, I just got back from riding and need some advice. I'm still trying to adjust things correctly. I noticed this time that my thighs come up too far and so im thinking again about putting on a suspension seatpost or raising the one i have on now. also the handlebars were better but I think need them closer to my body still and a little bit higher.

one problem i have is the part over the frame that tightens the seatpost is stiped I think. Are these easy to get and do they have to be stock in order to work correctly or can i just get one off of amazon?

Thanks for helping me with all this guys! It's slowly coming together. I think because my knees were rotating up to high, i had a hard time with a fluid motion while pedaling. I think raising the seat and handle bars a tad will help this. I might also get grippier pedals.
Highly recommend LBS help set bike up for you while you sit on it. Did you talk to the LBS about the pedal recall?
 

TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
Highly recommend LBS help set bike up for you while you sit on it. Did you talk to the LBS about the pedal recall?
That's a good idea. I should probably do that. They get so busy though- that's why I've been trying oh my own.

I did not mention the pedal recall. I noticed though, it has different pedals than the verve did.
 

AK99645

New Member
Region
USA
I came back to biking after a MB trip with daughter on Oahu. It had been a better than a decade since I had a bike and when the bike shop told ne the only new Trek they would have for months was the Allant 7S stagger I bought it.

What I love-Speed, power, range, hybrid design and the stagger frame, at pushing 70yo it seemed like a great choice. Two months later and almost 500 miles I had to sort out a few things.

What didn't work
Tires- Tubed tires are a PITA, fixing a flat in the shop is one thing, beside a trail 10 miles from home another thing.
The tread design left a lot to be desired off asphalt, even on dirt roads and mild trails. Once you point a 55lb bike down hill it's going to the bottom. There was not enough meat on the tire to brake well.

Fenders- Worked well until I encountered a little mud, the fenders filled up and the wheels quit turning. Not good.

My answer ? see the picture........Love the modified Allant 7S for my style on riding

Also had the bike shop turn off the always on light function, save the battery for when I'm on the asphalt.
 

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TrailSeeker

Active Member
Region
USA
I came back to biking after a MB trip with daughter on Oahu. It had been a better than a decade since I had a bike and when the bike shop told ne the only new Trek they would have for months was the Allant 7S stagger I bought it.

What I love-Speed, power, range, hybrid design and the stagger frame, at pushing 70yo it seemed like a great choice. Two months later and almost 500 miles I had to sort out a few things.

What didn't work
Tires- Tubed tires are a PITA, fixing a flat in the shop is one thing, beside a trail 10 miles from home another thing.
The tread design left a lot to be desired off asphalt, even on dirt roads and mild trails. Once you point a 55lb bike down hill it's going to the bottom. There was not enough meat on the tire to brake well.

Fenders- Worked well until I encountered a little mud, the fenders filled up and the wheels quit turning. Not good.

My answer ? see the picture........Love the modified Allant 7S for my style on riding

Also had the bike shop turn off the always on light function, save the battery for when I'm on the asphalt.
I love those tires! That's what I need for this winter. The traction on those almost look like they are studded, so I bet they grip really well. What kind of tires are they?

Also, I love what you did with the fender in the front - moving it upwards. I haven't used mine enough to notice how they work in mud but so far they've held their own. how do you like them being raised up like that?
 

AK99645

New Member
Region
USA
Bontrager XR3, tubeless 27.5 X 2.35, love them a little noisy going down the road. At my normal cadence cost me about 3 mph and 5 miles battery range. They work a lot better on dirty/sandy asphalt also, took a couple corners a bit hot and the old tires slipped enough to get my attention.

Lots of room for mud as needed.