Taking Your eBike RVing

L Johnston

New Member
Hi we recently got my wife a Trek Verve3+. She loves it. We're also thinking of getting an RV (maybe a Winnebago Micro Minnie). We obviously want to be able to take the bikes (mine a Trek MTB). She is concerned about two things: 1- the bike being in rain/snow, etc, and 2 - how to securely store them when at a camp site. I'd be interested in knowing if people on this site are doing this and what methods and precautions they might suggest. She would love to carry them in the trailer. One of the reasons we are thinking Micro Minnie is that there is a bunkhouse model that you can use the bunk area for storage if not required for sleeping. WE are currently unclear if the hatch (actually designed for egress in emergency for bunk occupants) would allow loading without really breaking the bike down. Not really our preference. We've looked at a few "toy hauler" concepts but they are real lite on the bathroom and sleeping accommodations if you really want to use it as an RV. I'm also considering a Verve3+ or an REI Co-op CTY 22.1 Bike which has all Shimano electric components. So really transportability and secure storage at what might be RV Parks, State/National campgrounds, etc.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
What are you using for a tow vehicle? If pick up, maybe set something to accommodate the bikes in the back?
 

L Johnston

New Member
What are you using for a tow vehicle? If pick up, maybe set something to accommodate the bikes in the back?
Good thought, but we do have a cover back there so that would have to be left open to all elements as well. If that is something that would be secure from a water/theft standpoint, I guess to keep the wind resistance down on the truck and add some storage, I would go with a hitch mount rack on the trailer? Tricky figuring all these things out. Thanks for the input.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
I don't think ebikes are as delicate as we think. I haul my Gazelle in the pickup bed. Then, at the campground I lock it to my trailer fender where it isn't sticking out. At night, I'm sleeping right next to it as the bed in my trailer is against the back wall and I also have a dog with me.
I thought nothing of leaving my bike out in a deluge. The bike is made by a Dutch company and they have wet weather there.

I've done the same with my Radmini. It suffered no ill effects. The Rad people said that as long as the water was coming down, the bike was going to be OK.

Check a hitch mount out carefully. I've heard that on my model of trailer, putting weight that far back can cause sway and affect the towing. I have a 17 foot long fiberglass travel trailer. I tow it with a long bed Toyota Tacoma.
DSC01376.JPG
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
Here is my pickup. I use motorcycle straps to hole the bike upright and I made a rack to run the front tire into that also holds it up.
It
DSC00973.JPG


It was early spring when the picture was taken and I still had tube sand in the back.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Northeast Pennsylvania
Check out this thread on the subject:


Scarecrow posted pics of an interesting product. It's the first post in his thread.
 

GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
We carry two bikes on our Aliner. A 26 fattie and a 20" folder. When camped both bikes go on the rack with a cable lock and locking clamps that latch onto the crossbar. When under way the folder goes in the rig. The cover is always on if on the rack. That said....lots if camping, Zero problems. Naturally the batteries are removed and kept in the car.
The Prairie 2020.jpg
 

Hectors Ghost

Active Member
I never pull a trailer unless I have to. It's not hard, it's just a pain in the ass mostly. I would opt for a great tow-hitch bike carrier over a trailer. They are easy to mount and dismount the bikes, it would be simple to secure them to the carrier, and when on the road you simply secure bike covers over them. You could go big-ticket and have a fiberglass hinged clam-shell top made to cover the bike. Plan for battery charging and storage inside or in a heated storage compartment. Baby your batteries.
 
Security Options
1.) it you use a hitch mounted bike rack made for ebikes you can get a locking one. Our Hollywood came with a long cable bike lock. Transport without the battery attached for a couple of reasons but an ebike without a battery has lower steal appeal. You can leave them locked on rack or attach them to a fixture at camp site, again without the battery attached.
2.) There are lots of covers available for transporting bikes. We recently went on a 3,000 mile trip. I covered battery connections, motor and seat with plastic and duct tape for transport as a low tech solution. I cleaned chain and derailleur before our ride.
 

Elkman

Active Member
The motorhomes that have a storage area that may accommodate two road bikes are under the master sleeping area and all that I have seen the result is the ceiling height in that area is less than 5.5 feet and there are steps down to the main salon and galley area from the sleeping area.

Check out the bike racks and you will notice that many can handle 120 lbs or less and that many will require a 2x2 hitch receiver. At least with a wide motorhome there is less chance of blocking the tail lights but the license plate still needs to be relocated to avoid a citation.

A cordless right angle grinder with a 4" cut-off wheel costs under $200 and allows a thief to cut through cables and shackles and hardened chain in seconds. My approach is to have a bike cover over the bikes so it is not obvious that we are hauling expensive e-bikes and to use a chain to slow down the casual thief but to rely primarily on a motion detecting alarm on the rack.

Another possible deterent would be a rear camera that covers the bike rack and also the area around it. Even a dummy camera would be a deterent and encourage a thief to find a rack where there is no camera on the RV. A dash camera may help in terms of providing video of someone lurking in the area while you are away from the RV.

The only way to guarantee no theft is to put the bikes inside an enclosed trailer and tow them behind the motorhome. I have been hauling expensive bikes in my pickup trucks for 50 years and the trucks had a cap and I would put curtains over the windows so no one could see what was inside. I never lost a bike and so I continue to subscribe to the out of sight out of mind to avoid theft of my stuff.
 

BikeOn

Member
(Sadly I live in a crime ridden urban area and have had many bikes stolen over the years Using less strict enforcement methods (good locks but not great locks,) etc.
Just returned from a 4500 mile road trip. 9 states. Encountered snow, rain, lightening, hail, 50 mile an hour wind and 107 degree weather. Camper van with bike rack on 2in hitch. Have five U shaped kryptonite locks. All other locks (thick cable, chains, pads have been broken into in the past). I brought two good quality bike covers. one was a back up. Whenever I was driving a long distance, expecting inclement weather, camping overnight, or leaving van for a tour, bikes were covered. But on top the cover was a large cargo net. This was to keep cover from flapping and being a distraction to other drivers, and to deter theft. Generally it took me about five to ten minutes to get net and cover Off and was a hassle I learned to accept and realize it’s value. Under the cover you would find my bikes, always with two locks on, both tires and frames secure. I kept keys in the same place every time so it was a repeatable system. The covers kept the bikes from the weather and cleaner for riding. Locking them to the rack lowered the chance of them falling off rack onto road. Usually I took a small lock with me when riding, in case I needed to use the bathroom. I had a great time, my bikes came home with me, and doing the same lock and cover and net routine many times built efficiency.
Good Luck!
 

Elkman

Active Member
Few bike racks are rated OK for RVs and those are not for mounting on a bumper as with a travel trailer. There are however, dual hitch receivers so the bottom one can be used for the trailer and the top one is available for a hitch mounted bike rack.

It seems for theft the best practice is to use a chain and also to cover the bikes and use a cargo net over the bike cover. The more you make it difficult for a thief to see what you are carrying and to gain access to the bike the better the odds that they will look for something else to take instead. A good bike cover for two bikes and a large cargo net costs under $100 in total.

This is the best bike alarm I have found:

Still looking for the best outdoor Wifi camera to mount to the ladder at the rear of our motorhome. Another deterent regardless of how well it works. A dash camera in a tow vehicle is another option.
 

Elkman

Active Member
On my first trip to China I noticed that a great many people were using electric bicycles and scooters. The bikes were small and light and could fit inside an elevator and be kept inside an apartment. The Blix Vika + is a similar bike as it folds and the 7 lb battery can be removed to make it even lighter at 47 lbs for carrying it up stairs. If the weight of your two bikes is less than 120 lbs then potential racks include the Swagman E-Spec (best deal overall and supports up to 140 lbs), Hollywood racks, Yakima OnRamp, Thules EasyFold XT2.