Tell Us About Your Commute.

rudymsmith

New Member
I commute in Mobile Alabama - death trap of sorts for cyclists. 11 Years ago I was hit dead on from the rear by a car travelling over 50 MPH. Yep, that hurt, and, still does.
I still commute every chance I get, even with a broken up body - I ride 6.6 miles to work in a full sprint on my Trek Super Commuter 8S; leaving the house at 4:30 a.m. to minimize heavy traffic flow. I go home around 5:45 pm and to stay alive, I ride an 8.8 mile alternative route. My ebike has allowed me to sprint into and out of the most dangerous areas, minimizing my exposure time in those places using timing of traffic flow and two mirrors to watch my back... It gets way too hot down here in the south and humidity rules the day. My body can no longer sweat since being hit by the car which means I have to be extremely careful and watch my heart rate and use my water bottles for sweat AND intake. Still regardless of the challenges there is nothing that makes me feel more alive than riding my bicycle to and from work.
 

Jaxx

Well-Known Member
It's actually safer riding amongst 12 million people and cars in London? The traffic moves that slow nowadays, plus TFL (traffic for London) started a initiative 20 odd years ago, to get folks commuting into town by bike. If you ever get the opportunity? Watch a live outside broadcast from London (say the news) at rush hour. Thousands up on thousands of cyclists often in BIG groups. In town it's the motorist who feels intimidated nowadays. BTW, whenever I'm in Montgomery? Always visit Hanks grave with flowers. And may you stay safe and keep riding?
 

Jyrki

New Member
I commute 11,7km (about 7,5 miles) from suburban to urban (Espoo - Helsinki, Finland). Several years ago I used to do it by a plane bike but had to stop that for several reasons. I bought my first e-bike last December and since that I have used a car for commuting only about five times.

By car it takes 25-40 min depending on the traffic. With my e-bike, now during summer time it takes 28-33min depending on, do I want to sweat or not :). So, one of the reasons for e-biking is to standardize the commuting time. In winter - which here in Finland means snow and ice - the time is between 35 - 45 min depending on the condition of the bike lanes. Ice is not a problem, since here we use winter tyres with spikes, but semi-hard snow is a problem... Probably my next winter tyres should be as wide as the forks tolerate, to simulate a fat bike...

Especially during the winter time it is much easier to have appropriate clothing with an e-bike when compared to plain biking. And if one doesn't or can't shower after biking, it is not necessary with an e-bike.

We have also public transport here, but my commute means a bus-metro-bus trip which takes at least 60 min! So, an e-bike is really the vehicle of choice!

And with e-bike, no parking problems :)!

One plain biker claimed that I should use a plain bike instead of electric because of ecological reasons. But then I approximated the amount of electricity I use during a one year commuting, and ended to about 30kWh. That amount of electricity is produced during one single sunny summer day by the solar panels I have on the roof of my house! So, I don't believe that my e-bike destroys the World. Instead, my e-bike commuting spares at least 300 litres (about 80 gal) of gasoline a year.
 

Solom01

Well-Known Member
Hi Jyrki, welcome. You may want to ask that person about how much energy he/she uses to pedal the plain bike and where that energy comes from. It takes energy to harvest and transport food and the last time I read about it, it is actually more harmful to the environment to use human energy than an ebike. Until humans learn to create energy from photosynthesis they may not want to accuse ebikes of harming the environment.
 

Cyklefanatic

Active Member
I commute 49 km round trip to work. I am mainly on bike paths or roads with bike lanes. I love meeting and talking with other riders on the way to work, that never happens in my car. The route is fairly flat except at the very end with a climb in the morning and a nice downhill going home. Very consistent 60 minutes to work and I arrive happy and no sign of sweat.
 

christob

Well-Known Member
Last 2 days I've had to drive the car into work. It is only 5 miles one way. (When I bike it, I take a route approximately 7 miles in the morning and approximately 15 to return home.)
I couldn't believe how quickly being in a car, subject to car traffic, got me wound up. Traffic lights timed so the same line of cars is stopped at each light, 4 lights in a row... Idiot drivers texting when the light changes to green, so nobody gets to move anyway... Uber drivers slowing down to 5mph in rush hour traffic to see "Is this the right-turn my gps appears to be telling me to take? No -- oops it must be the next one..." I was cursing under my breath for easily half the commute, as my stress and frustration wound upwards.
I can't wait to get back on the bike commute Monday, where the worst cursing might come from unexpectedly catching a bug in my mouth while smiling so broadly!
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
Last 2 days I've had to drive the car into work ... I was cursing under my breath for easily half the commute, as my stress and frustration wound upwards ...
For me, with car commuting, I notice the tension in my muscles. I have to concentrate to relax my body when commuting by car. By the time I get to work, I usually need a good walk to "unwind" and shed the negativity that accumulates on the commute. Being surrounded by angry, aggressive people in traffic is contagious. Bike commuting puts me in a much better mood and even when something negative happens, I tend to shed it much more quickly - which I figure is due to the exercise and open-air nature of bike commuting.
 

17Stratton

Active Member
My bike commute is 58 miles round trip. Southern Westchester County to Financial District in NYC. Takes about 90 minutes each way by bike, takes 60 to 90 minutes each way by car. Honestly, it is a bit too long, only can manage it once or twice a week due to fitness, weather, meetings etc. Good news is about 80% is on bike path or dedicated bike line. Travelling through the city streets of the Bronx can be challenging (and by the way, I think pot is legal in the Bronx based on the constant aroma I experience on each ride!). The Hudson River Greenway is also challenging because of slow Citibike riders and tourists. Looking forward to my first nighttime commute next week.
 

DIL

New Member
I'm new to this site. Purchased my Specialized Vado 4.0 in April when it was on a killer sale. My goal for purchasing an e-bike was to cut my 1.5 hr commute down to 1 hr. That Vado did the trick and was really fun to ride for about 3-4 weeks before it was stolen last week. I have 15.5 miles 1 way in hilly Seattle. Mixed road/shoulder/sidewalk conditions. In the sport/middle assist level I made it in 58-64 minutes consistently. The battery was at 50% on the "most used" mornings, but I would use the eco-mode on much of my commute home and have plenty of battery left.
In the few weeks I rode that bike I believe I lost 4 lbs! I was riding a conventional Trek bicycle but not consistently both ways (3+hrs of commute and cleanup gets old) and not as much during the COVID-19 spring when the only family car suddenly became available and the streets were basically empty. Hence, I wasn't getting as much exercise.
Not looking forward to spending more money on a second e-bike (not on sale now, of course) but it IS my commuting vehicle. So, for anyone wondering about using an e-bike to commute, if you are comfortable on a bike in general, the e-bike is a no-brainer instead of a car. It's fun experimenting, too, to see what it takes to make the battery last longer or the commute shorter. Happy cycling!
 

christob

Well-Known Member
@DIL glad to hear what a great experience (and deal) you had with that bike; of course, really sorry to hear it was eventually stolen! What options or changes are you considering, in light of the theft, for the new bike?
 

DIL

New Member
@DIL glad to hear what a great experience (and deal) you had with that bike; of course, really sorry to hear it was eventually stolen! What options or changes are you considering, in light of the theft, for the new bike?
I was in the process of needing to adjust my grip on the handlebars. Would have tried a riser, changed out the grips, and possibly have shortened the width of the handlebars overall. So, my next bike needs to be comfortable in the handlebar area, maybe slightly more upright. I just found a seat that was more comfortable and installed a better tail light, both gone now. I may have to wait until after the summer. Bike sales are up right now, many bikes are out of stock, and not likely to see an incentive/sale any time soon for that reason. Thanks for asking.
 

Hasaf

New Member
I have a pretty short commute, it is only about 4.5 miles. It is entirely on city streets.

However, winds at and above 50mph are not uncommon. Fortunately, they are mostly head or tail winds, from the side is a lot harder to deal with. This is largely what pushed me to an eBike.

I am currently using a DIY. I looked at bikesdirect for the cheapest bike I could find with hydraulic brakes, I have dealt with frozen brake cables in the past, I also switched a bicycle from mid-grade cable pulls with low/mid hydraulic and I was impressed to the point that I can not see going back (of course, my cat-trike, non-assisted, weekend toy has cable pull brakes).

On that bikes direct bike I have a TSDZ2 and just this weekend I put a NuVinci N380 on it. I also switched the bike from 27.5" to 26". It lowers the bike a bit, but the main reason I did it was that there are street-oriented studded tyres available for 26" but not for 27.5"