The new turbo Vado 2017

Drew224

New Member
IM on the fence about picking up an extra battery (if it can be had...) to extend the life of the bike, but at the same time I don’t want to dump more money into an unsupported system... If Specialized could throw us a bone for a credit/trade in program 2-3 years down the line Id be fairly happy. I LOVE THE LOOK of the streamlined TURBO vs the VADO. The Vados look like a pregnant bike...

I know right....yeah I didn't like them from the get go. It's like their eliminating everything they started with and starting over with this line. Turbo's aggressive as hell....Vado....a gender neutral version.
Don't know why they can't have both??? Girls Vado and men's are basically identical...why?!?!
 

ronin2000

Member
I know right....yeah I didn't like them from the get go. It's like their eliminating everything they started with and starting over with this line. Turbo's aggressive as hell....Vado....a gender neutral version.
Don't know why they can't have both??? Girls Vado and men's are basically identical...why?!?!


If we can get these batteries repacked, I’m on board, I figure absolute worst case scenario, if the motor and batteries die, ill gut the battery on this bike, remove the rear hub, and convert it to another hub/mid drive from another brand, and use the battery pack space with repacked batteries. No sense letting a sexy bike go to waste right?
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Today I followed up my phone conversation with a formal email to the Turbo Product Manager. Key things I asked for were 5 year availability for out-of-warranty spares through the dealers and/or accessory catalog for:
  • Battery - At least the option to purchase a 691 Wh battery which can be used to replace any earlier Turbo battery. Or an approved battery refurb program where one gets a new battery and returns a core.
  • Handlebar Controllers - Spares availability for both the Shimano brake version (new Turbo X/S) and the older Formula Version (base Turbo, older Turbo X, Turbo S). Due to frequency of backlight failures and joystick failures.
  • Motors - At least the 250W motor for all base Turbo and older Turbo S/X. 500W version for new Turbo S. They can end-of-life the 200W, since the 250W could be a direct replacement.
I also suggested very strongly that Specialized read through this entire thread. I doubt they have ever end-of-life'd a bike before that has this much proprietary content and high average sales price. The issue is not just warranty support, but customer loyalty as they transition to the new model.

Doug

P.S. Go on line and read the Vado user manual. The feature set is really pretty good.
 

ronin2000

Member
Today I followed up my phone conversation with a formal email to the Turbo Product Manager. Key things I asked for were 5 year availability for out-of-warranty spares through the dealers and/or accessory catalog for:
  • Battery - At least the option to purchase a 691 Wh battery which can be used to replace any earlier Turbo battery. Or an approved battery refurb program where one gets a new battery and returns a core.
  • Handlebar Controllers - Spares availability for both the Shimano brake version (new Turbo X/S) and the older Formula Version (base Turbo, older Turbo X, Turbo S). Due to frequency of backlight failures and joystick failures.
  • Motors - At least the 250W motor for all base Turbo and older Turbo S/X. 500W version for new Turbo S. They can end-of-life the 200W, since the 250W could be a direct replacement.
I also suggested very strongly that Specialized read through this entire thread. I doubt they have ever end-of-life'd a bike before that has this much proprietary content and high average sales price. The issue is not just warranty support, but customer loyalty as they transition to the new model.

Doug

P.S. Go on line and read the Vado user manual. The feature set is really pretty good.


I read the Specs on the VADO, they seem quite nice and at a lower entry price to boot. Id just be less inclined to buy one if Specialized doesn’t support previous Turbo purchases and snubbed the current 1st get buyers. The specs seem more than adequate, however I’m still not sold on the aesthetics of the bike itself, perhaps seeing it in person would change my opinion.
 

mattbytes

Member
This is a little confusing. If you look at the images, the 5.0 has a price point of $5k but when you go to the details it's actually $4200. For the 3.0, the image shows it's $3000 but the detail shows it's actually $3200.

2017-04-24_20-14-29.png


2017-04-24_20-16-47.png
2017-04-24_20-17-13.png
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
I believe that the $3200 and $4600 are the correct prices. While the web site is evolving, keep in mind that Specialized hasnt yet formally launched the Vado line in the US. Once the launch event happens I will believethe pricing.
 

Trail Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Vado all-weather full fenders.
This new Vado has an extended front fender close to the ground although it doesn't look like it has a flexible lower lip. I knew that the front fender has to extend all the way down in order the protect the mid drive from road splash and dirt. More especially if you have the low lying Bafang BBS. The modifications I did to my fender effectively kept my BBS and my shoes splash free and dirt free. However, when I carry my ebike through stairs the lower lip actually touches the steps, good thing it's made up of flexible rubber.
fender.jpg


Addendum:
I take that back. After reviewing the video, there is actually a flexible rubber mud flap that is flush mounted to the fender. Sweet!
 
Last edited:

Melanie

New Member
I've been debating about the vado for six months. Now that it's available for order in USA I've been considering more because of battery issues and such. However, it is the only bike available near me that looks like a bike that doesn't have a battery slapped onto the down tube. I am 5 ft tall and other bikes with intergraded batteries are too big for me. I will be riding pavement half the time. The other 50 percent of the time will be dirt roads and light trails. I planned on removing the front fender cause I don't want rocks getting jammed between tire and said fender. Am I being silly? Should I wait even longer to see if their HT 29 is more appropriate for me? The levo 6 fatties seems too mountain bike for me. I really like the lights and rack too on the vado. Comments and suggestions welcome.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
I've been debating about the vado for six months. Now that it's available for order in USA I've been considering more because of battery issues and such. However, it is the only bike available near me that looks like a bike that doesn't have a battery slapped onto the down tube. I am 5 ft tall and other bikes with intergraded batteries are too big for me. I will be riding pavement half the time. The other 50 percent of the time will be dirt roads and light trails. I planned on removing the front fender cause I don't want rocks getting jammed between tire and said fender. Am I being silly? Should I wait even longer to see if their HT 29 is more appropriate for me? The levo 6 fatties seems too mountain bike for me. I really like the lights and rack too on the vado. Comments and suggestions welcome.

I would leave the looks aside and stick to functionality... If you really think there's a chance of a rock getting stuck in the front fender, then you've the chosen the wrong bike. Moreover, if it can get stuck in the front fender, nothing will stop it from getting stuck in the rear. I have a trekking type bike and occasionally do dirt trails (5-10% of the time). The shorter the distance the better because the front suspension isn't really designed for big bumps and the whole bike rattles and handles poorly. So, based on what you told us, I think you've chosen the wrong bike. Do some demos and (if possible) try them on your dirt trails. With 50% off-road riding you're a prime candidate for a mountain bike. The Vado is most likely not adapted to your terrain.
 

jwb

Member
I find the comparison to the Stromer ST2 amusing. That bike is so heavy, it's like carrying another bicycle with you. 50lbs is a magic number because at least where I live it is the load limit of bike racks on transit. 65lbs rules out the possibility of taking the bike on a bus or train.

I see that the Vado weighs even less than the Turbo, at 46lbs. That's really good. I can't find data for the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s yet, but with its absurdly wide tires I have a feeling it will be over 50.
 

Drew224

New Member
I find the comparison to the Stromer ST2 amusing. That bike is so heavy, it's like carrying another bicycle with you. 50lbs is a magic number because at least where I live it is the load limit of bike racks on transit. 65lbs rules out the possibility of taking the bike on a bus or train.

I see that the Vado weighs even less than the Turbo, at 46lbs. That's really good. I can't find data for the Trek Super Commuter+ 8s yet, but with its absurdly wide tires I have a feeling it will be over 50.

Ok...we'll let me state that this seems to be just a "you" issue with the bike...and not one with previous turbo owners. You put a smaller motor and battery on a bike...the Vado is what your gonna get. You put a smaller battery and motor on any electric bike...which there's plenty of them out there...it's gonna be lighter. Specialized was a race inspired company...but now it looks like their trying too keep up with the joneses. The troubling issue with me and people that have bought a turbo...is that their SOL on any customer service from here on out. They took a perfectly aggressive looking bike and came up with the Vado??? WTF?!?! This forum is taking a bit of a uturn from what I was trying to get out of it btw. If specialized is done with this battery issue...than I'm done with specialized...end of story!!!
 

jwb

Member
Well yes, if you put a small
Ok...we'll let me state that this seems to be just a "you" issue with the bike...and not one with previous turbo owners. You put a smaller motor and battery on a bike...the Vado is what your gonna get. You put a smaller battery and motor on any electric bike...which there's plenty of them out there...it's gonna be lighter. Specialized was a race inspired company...but now it looks like their trying too keep up with the joneses. The troubling issue with me and people that have bought a turbo...is that their SOL on any customer service from here on out. They took a perfectly aggressive looking bike and came up with the Vado??? WTF?!?! This forum is taking a bit of a uturn from what I was trying to get out of it btw. If specialized is done with this battery issue...than I'm done with specialized...end of story!!!

Yes, if you put a smaller motor and battery on a bike then what you get is a bike that weighs under 50lbs, which is a magic point that opens up new possibilities. If I needed a vehicle that weighed so much that I couldn't take it on the bus or train, and that costs $7000, I'd just get a 600cc motorcycle. Bikes under 50lbs are in their own category and that category is "bicycle". The Stromer is in some other category. Probably "boat anchor".

Totally agreed on the appearance of the Turbo Vado. Looks ridiculous, but essentially dictated by the mid-drive and integrated battery. Still not as ugly as the Trek.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
Fellas, can't we all just get along? Let me divert the thread a minute: the new Super Commuter is making an appearance at a demo day event at a bike shop about forty minutes from me later on today. I'm gonna hotfoot it down there and take a ride on this potentially tremendous new bike. I'll report back in theTrek thread later on. I'll try to grab some pictures as well.
 

mattbytes

Member
Looking forward to the Trek feedback. Personally, I think the Vado has a look that will grow on us. So i'm taking wait and see approach until I'm able to see it in person.
 

ronin2000

Member
I believe that the $3200 and $4600 are the correct prices. While the web site is evolving, keep in mind that Specialized hasnt yet formally launched the Vado line in the US. Once the launch event happens I will believethe pricing.
Have you had any reply back from Specialized regarding longterm support? Im curious to see what happens.
 

fxr3

Active Member
Well yes, if you put a small


Yes, if you put a smaller motor and battery on a bike then what you get is a bike that weighs under 50lbs, which is a magic point that opens up new possibilities. If I needed a vehicle that weighed so much that I couldn't take it on the bus or train, and that costs $7000, I'd just get a 600cc motorcycle. Bikes under 50lbs are in their own category and that category is "bicycle". The Stromer is in some other category. Probably "boat anchor".

Totally agreed on the appearance of the Turbo Vado. Looks ridiculous, but essentially dictated by the mid-drive and integrated battery. Still not as ugly as the Trek.
So 5 more lbs changes bike from magic and opening new possibilities to boat anchor? Good luck discreetly and safely enjoying bike path on your new 600.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Not yet. I will try a phone call tomorrow.

Spoke very briefly through a bad cell connection with the product manager. She was surprised I had not gotten her email. I will try to get this in writing, but her words were that the Manager of Warranty support wrote her that the legacy Turbo line would continue to be supported, including batteries, motors, unique parts, etc. through 2021.