The Outfitter Has Arrived

Chandlee EBS

Active Member
omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg. omg.
 

Chandlee EBS

Active Member
What is the difference between the outfitter and lebowske? Besides visual.
The Lebowske is $300 more with a drop seat (probably the coolest upgrade), XO drivetrain and Guide RSC brakes, so you can adjust pad tightness on the handlebars.

The Outfitter uses a level lower in drivetrain and brakes (xo1 and guide rs), but both are still very good. It compensates the two fantastic Old Man Mountain racks and integrated light and motion front light

Guys have been tearing up our Lebowske on the trails for weeks and they love it. It feels super high-end. And people love it on the street.

The outfitter has immediately attracted ATV guys and hunters. Looks like we're mounting a gun rack on the first one out.

Oddly, both bikes feel like some of the lightest in the shop.

Still waiting for accessories for the Outfitter. Then the circle will be complete.
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Hey @Chandlee EBS, thanks for filling in the differences between the LEBOWSKe and OUTFITTER. I was struggling to recognize them as I reviewed but figured weight was one (the LEBOWSKe also uses a carbon handle bar where I think the OUTFITTER does not). Here's my full review and video embedded below. If there's any way you can weigh your model, I left my scale at home when I reviewed the bike and would like to confirm ~53 lbs.

 

scmike

Active Member
Court,
Enjoyed the review, I'm glad you used a clamp mount for your GoPro... Looks like you pushed it to some near falls. That's one tough. well thought out fat eBike. The frame looks like a medium sized motorcycle could have been built with it... After riding the Outfitter, other fat eBikes might feel a bit underbuilt by comparison...
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Hey @Chandlee EBS, thanks for filling in the differences between the LEBOWSKe and OUTFITTER. I was struggling to recognize them as I reviewed but figured weight was one (the LEBOWSKe also uses a carbon handle bar where I think the OUTFITTER does not). Here's my full review and video embedded below. If there's any way you can weigh your model, I left my scale at home when I reviewed the bike and would like to confirm ~53 lbs.

Kind of strange Court.. The more expensive the bike the less critical the testing...Did you verify the range of 57 miles, or 30 miles or whatever it is?

This $5500 bike is touted as a backwoods eBike.. What's the range on the trails? Don't you think people who would consider this bike would want to know how far they can go into the woods before they have to turn around, so they don't have to push this overpriced pos home?

Anyone considering spending $5500 should know exactly what they are getting, don't you think? Or is that the sponsors' job?
 

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Hi @JoePah , I've verified the range on the Bosch systems and estimated how it would perform on a heavier fat ebike like the OUTFITTER. It's a pretty impressive build but does suffer a bit in terms of range due to the weight and larger tire patch / friction. The estimated range posted on the review is really wide (I wrote 30 to 60 miles) and of course that depends on rider weight, terrain and even wind conditions. These sophisticated pedal assist only ebikes do very well, especially given the eleven speed rear cassette in use here. On the trails, depending on what type of trail you're on and the level of assist chosen, I think you could get upwards of 30 miles :)

People who get this bike can estimate range pretty well in the woods or otherwise because it dynamically measures battery level as compared to power output. If you are working the system harder, the range will drop way down and vice versa.

I've tried to answer your questions respectfully and to the best of my ability. I work really hard testing these electric bikes (all of them) but do have to estimate at times and often run with information provided by manufacturers. The reason Felt is a site sponsor here is because they offer a diverse selection of products and have an excellent reputation in the space. I do not want to mislead readers in exchange for advertising dollars, that is why you will only see high quality sponsors on EBR. Each one is approached by me after I have reviewed their products and found them to be excellent... this is my way of trying to avoid a conflict of interest. I realize that Felt, Haibike, Focus etc. products often cost more but I feel like I can trust them and I appreciate the respectful way they treat me.
 

Chandlee EBS

Active Member
Hey @Chandlee EBS, thanks for filling in the differences between the LEBOWSKe and OUTFITTER. I was struggling to recognize them as I reviewed but figured weight was one (the LEBOWSKe also uses a carbon handle bar where I think the OUTFITTER does not). Here's my full review and video embedded below. If there's any way you can weigh your model, I left my scale at home when I reviewed the bike and would like to confirm ~53 lbs.

The lebowske is freakishly light.
 
Anyone spending almost $6000 on a low performing eBike with poor handling and low top end must not know what they want, and will probably relegate it to the closet after the first season.
 
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Court

Administrator
Staff member
Anyone spending almost $6000 on a low performing eBike with poor handling and low top end must not know what they want, and will probably relegate it to the closet after the first season.
In my opinion the OUTFITTER is a high performing electric bike with solid components, a unique and beautiful aesthetic, great climbing ability due to the mid-drive and 11 speed cassette, solid range and good handling (as long as the front rack isn't overloaded). Could you please be more specific if you choose to critique an ebike? Your comment seems insensitive, uneducated and passive aggressive to me which engenders a retaliative response instead of a supportive friendly one. Are you alright?
 

Chris882

New Member
Not considering inflation levels, I've read that the particular fat bike tire can vary considerably the way the bike handles. With a back injury and wanting a smooth ride, with a thud buster a given and full suspension bikes being considered, these fat bikes (with/without suspension fork), are also getting my attention. A mid drive with no suspension would be a low maintenance bike, and a loss of efficiency might not be an issue with me. I will ride mostly on the road and easy trails and I'm wondering how the stock tires would do on the road. Any information regarding a fat bikes handling on the road, and what role tires play in this handling; any feedback on this would be appreciated.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
You'll find the most in depth fat tire discussion over at the mtbr forum in the fat bike section. There is a thread about the jumbo Jim's, unfortunately there is literally only one person that had a set and they just got them today...from someone who took them off their felt bike!

Based on the design, my guess would be these tires will be a good ride with minimal self steer. The worst tires for self steer trend to be those with more rubber contacting the ground, i.e. Low or no knobs. They wouldn't put junk on a high end bike like this.

As to the ride, I am a big guy, and find my fat bike ride much more comfortable than my neo xtrem with only a front suspension fork and average mtb tires.