The ultimate bike saddle for the sensitive male

Brockrock

Member
Region
USA
First off, I have no connection to this company other than my being a very happy customer, so this is not a promotion. I am simply hoping that this review may possibly help someone who is in a similar situation to one I was once in.

Several years ago, I had to stop riding my bicycle because of uncomfortable numbness issues in my groin after even a fairly short ride, but prior to giving up, I tried everything I could. Padded shorts, several different, traditional style saddles, angling the saddles downward to hopefully remove the pressure from the 'horn', and when nothing seemed to really work well, I finally gave up. Then, I recall searching by terms like 'alternative bike saddle' and the like, and after trying several - and some were fairly expensive - alternative saddles (without the 'horn'), I settled on, and still use today, my SpiderFlex - https://spiderflex.com/

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My Aventon Level is the third bike that I have put this saddle on. The prior bikes were traditional bicycles, and I can only guess that it has probably 5-6 thousand miles on it in total, and climbing... The seat itself is ultra well made, with a stout, quality steel frame, firm padding, a thick rubber cover that is only lightly polished in some areas after so many miles, and in pic 2 above, what is an incorporated, rear shock-absorber can be seen. Because of the saddle's design, there is absolutely no pressure placed on the sensitive, male anatomy, and the seat pads themselves simply support the body's sit-bones. As such, it does take some serious getting used to, and several adjustments (seat height, seat tilt, seat position forward/backward), but when it's dialed in, and once you get used to not having that horn, it is the best.

So, before giving up riding because of numbness or other comfort issues, seriously consider this saddle. It's the real deal!
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
I admit it has possibilities, but would the average recreational rider cough up that much for
a bike seat? Other folks have limited budgets for nonessentials. A conditional maybe at half
that price.
 

Brockrock

Member
Region
USA
Maybe, but for the OP, the cost of having fun and enjoying their ebike was worth it.
Yeah, I went through several alternative saddles before settling on the SpiderFlex. None of them were as well made as it. One saddle even offered a slight swivel action until it swiveled right off the seat post one day…. That was an interesting ride home.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
First off, I have no connection to this company other than my being a very happy customer, so this is not a promotion. I am simply hoping that this review may possibly help someone who is in a similar situation to one I was once in.

Several years ago, I had to stop riding my bicycle because of uncomfortable numbness issues in my groin after even a fairly short ride, but prior to giving up, I tried everything I could. Padded shorts, several different, traditional style saddles, angling the saddles downward to hopefully remove the pressure from the 'horn', and when nothing seemed to really work well, I finally gave up. Then, I recall searching by terms like 'alternative bike saddle' and the like, and after trying several - and some were fairly expensive - alternative saddles (without the 'horn'), I settled on, and still use today, my SpiderFlex - https://spiderflex.com/

View attachment 88548

View attachment 88549View attachment 88550

My Aventon Level is the third bike that I have put this saddle on. The prior bikes were traditional bicycles, and I can only guess that it has probably 5-6 thousand miles on it in total, and climbing... The seat itself is ultra well made, with a stout, quality steel frame, firm padding, a thick rubber cover that is only lightly polished in some areas after so many miles, and in pic 2 above, what is an incorporated, rear shock-absorber can be seen. Because of the saddle's design, there is absolutely no pressure placed on the sensitive, male anatomy, and the seat pads themselves simply support the body's sit-bones. As such, it does take some serious getting used to, and several adjustments (seat height, seat tilt, seat position forward/backward), but when it's dialed in, and once you get used to not having that horn, it is the best.

So, before giving up riding because of numbness or other comfort issues, seriously consider this saddle. It's the real deal!
My situation is exactly the same as yours. Rather than give up riding as my doctor suggested, I tried a dozen or more hornless seats with varying degrees of success. 10 years ago, I discovered the Spiderflex and have been using them on all my conventional and e-bikes. Sure, spending $130 on a bike seat may be considered excessive by some but not so much when the alternative is to give up cycling.

As long as you're throwing money at the problem, you might also consider a Kinekt 2.1 or Thudbuster LT suspension seat post. From your pictures, you have enough seat tube clearance. I have both and for me anyway, they almost double the comfort afforded by the Spiderflex.

For those on a budget who also have this numbness problem, a cheaper alternative that works almost as well for me is the Hobson Easy Seat II:

The Spiderflex, as well as other noseless seats, have been discussed here before in several threads but thanks for posting your experience as it may benefit others:
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
I admit it has possibilities, but would the average recreational rider cough up that much for
a bike seat? Other folks have limited budgets for nonessentials. A conditional maybe at half
that price.
Oh, I don't know if that's too expensive given people spend upwards or 3k plus for their bikes. I was searching for seat options and found this one at $160.00 and it gets fantastic user ratings.
People spend that much on rack Bags, Seat Post like the KINEKT 3.1 Seatpost found HERE. I guess it comes down to what you value, Yes this is for recreation or commutes but you need comfort.
I know some golfers who would not blink on dropping big bucks on a New Driver.
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zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Yeah, I went through several alternative saddles before settling on the SpiderFlex. None of them were as well made as it. One saddle even offered a slight swivel action until it swiveled right off the seat post one day…. That was an interesting ride home.
I feel ya, I have some issues with my saddle feeling like a tennis match. WhenI look for alternatives the market is daunting, so many choices, styles, recommendations and all have Five Star ratings.
Maybe it best to just "Toughen up buttercup" and wear tighter shorts.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I don't think the Spiderflex is overly expensive. I spent more (for each) on two Brooks Cambuim saddles that I found to be very uncomfortable. I know that Brooks saddles gets rave reviews, but they didn't work for me.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
I don't think the Spiderflex is overly expensive. I spent more (for each) on two Brooks Cambuim saddles that I found to be very uncomfortable. I know that Brooks saddles gets rave reviews, but they didn't work for me.
I wondered that, you can't trust reviews but they do help to point out things you may not have considered. Forum reviews are a much better gauge Only if you have other cosign the comments.
That being said I do love the Leather Look on bikes, I just can't justify pulling the trigger
.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The leather Brooks saddles work for me and I have spent a lot of money on them. I haven't tried the Cambium though. That B17 with the hammered rivets is gorgeous, but they don't look like that after they are broken in. 😄 The Spiderflex is strange looking, but I would buy one if it made the difference between being able to ride my bike or not.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
The leather Brooks saddles work for me and I have spent a lot of money on them. I haven't tried the Cambium though. That B17 with the hammered rivets is gorgeous, but they don't look like that after they are broken in. 😄 The Spiderflex is strange looking, but I would buy one if it made the difference between being able to ride my bike or not.
Yep, they say it's character but lets these example be the judge.
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Brockrock

Member
Region
USA
My situation is exactly the same as yours. Rather than give up riding as my doctor suggested, I tried a dozen or more hornless seats with varying degrees of success. 10 years ago, I discovered the Spiderflex and have been using them on all my conventional and e-bikes. Sure, spending $130 on a bike seat may be considered excessive by some but not so much when the alternative is to give up cycling.

As long as you're throwing money at the problem, you might also consider a Kinekt 2.1 or Thudbuster LT suspension seat post. From your pictures, you have enough seat tube clearance. I have both and for me anyway, they almost double the comfort afforded by the Spiderflex.

For those on a budget who also have this numbness problem, a cheaper alternative that works almost as well for me is the Hobson Easy Seat II:

The Spiderflex, as well as other noseless seats, have been discussed here before in several threads but thanks for posting your experience as it may benefit others:
I appreciate your reply. For me, this saddle has been the answer to my issues. Many people recoil at the idea of departing from a convention that has been a part of biking since they were very young, and I fully understand and can relate to that. The interesting thing is, although a saddle horn provides for a sense of being more connected to the bike’s movements - and its control - I have found that I have even more control with this saddle due to using my whole body rather than just my thighs. One of the former bikes that I used this saddle on was a mountain bike, and I loved it on the single track and technical parts. Also, I think a lot of folks immediately don’t like it because it feels weird, and they never take the time to dial it in and get used to it. I have looked at the Kinekt seat posts and may consider that in the future, but that kind of comfort is not really important to me really. I don’t need a cushy ride. I need one that doesn’t feel like it is harming me…;)
 

Rincon

Well-Known Member
I admit it has possibilities, but would the average recreational rider cough up that much for
a bike seat?
I don’t think I’ve ever spent that little on a saddle.

However, if a saddle that ugly solves a problem, then they can ask whatever they want. It certainly is not for the average rider. It’s for a rider with a specific issue in their tissue. Numb nuts isn’t fun.