The Ultimate Mid-Drive Chain Care Thread

Dono Be

Member
Ha..... I started using wax at 15 years old. I figured I was the coolest kid in my neighborhood.Circa 1982. Earlier...at 9years...I was cracking open young chestnut and using the oil inside...LMFAO
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bob armani

Well-Known Member
Here is the best tip. Wipe the chain off and relube it on the bike, and wipe the excess off. You are gonna change it in 1,000 miles anyway. Why go thru all the trouble of cleaning for showroom clean?... it's gonna get dirty anyway.... it's a chain. Put bike in large chainring in front and smallest cog in the rear. Do not shift gears during the process. Do not lube the cassette.
"Change it in a 1000 miles anyway"? I am still riding on my stock chain after 2500 miles without issue. It is a KMC which still appears to be within spec. Had me worried there for a minute.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
FYI-One of the posters here mentioned a zip tie with a quick release tab slipped through the chainring and then wrapped around the crank arm would work as well.

As previously mentioned in the video... an Allen Hex wrench inserted in one of the chainring bolts will also work.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
"Change it in a 1000 miles anyway"? I am still riding on my stock chain after 2500 miles without issue. It is a KMC which still appears to be within spec. Had me worried there for a minute.
Depends on your drive (mid-drive, hub...?), but I do change my mid-drive chain every 1,000 miles. Cheap insurance to prevent damage to other more expensive drive components. Others have reported additional costs when stretching out their chain life in mid-drive bikes.
 

Extreme1

New Member
Anyone tried Brake Cleaner for a car, to clean their bicycle chain? You'd need to take the chain off the bike because brake cleaner destroys paint. It is $5 a can, aerosol, and comes with a spray tube. It will leave the chain squeaky clean and ready for your favorite lube.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Anyone tried Brake Cleaner for a car, to clean their bicycle chain? You'd need to take the chain off the bike because brake cleaner destroys paint.

It is $5 a can, aerosol, and comes with a spray tube. It will leave the chain squeaky clean and ready for your favorite lube.

Good point about using brake cleaner... I recommend using electrical contact cleaner that is safe on paint and plastic.

 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
All- Here is something that was concerning to me found in the EMBN comments section from the video in this thread. I currently use the degreaser method from time to time when doing my cleanings:

"I don’t clean the chain on the bike anymore- The degreaser collects in the well behind the drive sprocket and runs down to the outer motor bearing. I had to have the motor replaced at 2000kms as this bearing had corroded and failed. Clean the chain off the bike guys not worth the chance".

Anyone experience this or can this be a threat to motor bearings? Comments appreciated. 🧐 🤔
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
All- Here is something that was concerning to me found in the EMBN comments section from the video in this thread. I currently use the degreaser method from time to time when doing my cleanings:

"I don’t clean the chain on the bike anymore- The degreaser collects in the well behind the drive sprocket and runs down to the outer motor bearing. I had to have the motor replaced at 2000kms as this bearing had corroded and failed. Clean the chain off the bike guys not worth the chance".

Anyone experience this or can this be a threat to motor bearings? Comments appreciated. 🧐 🤔
The Brose mid-drives have full-sized chainrings. Mine is a 48t. I haven't noticed any degreaser dripping off he chainring. Motors with smaller drive cogs (as small as 18t apparently) might be more of a concern.
 

Chris C

New Member
A method I have used for larger industrial chanis is to periodically check the lateral deflection. Push sideways on the chain with your thumb. When deflection increases noticeably, significant wear has occurred and it is time to change the chain.

It might work with bicycle chains but I just tried it on my 10 year old mountain bike that had huge ability to latterly deflect vs. my wifes newer cruiser. They were similar! Bike chains (maybe cheap ones) have alot of lateral deflection capability.

Another idea is to twist the chain and check ability to rotate. That test went a little more as expected. The older chain rotated significantly more than the newer chain.

Just a couple of simple ideas.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
A method I have used for larger industrial chanis is to periodically check the lateral deflection. Push sideways on the chain with your thumb. When deflection increases noticeably, significant wear has occurred and it is time to change the chain.

It might work with bicycle chains but I just tried it on my 10 year old mountain bike that had huge ability to latterly deflect vs. my wifes newer cruiser. They were similar! Bike chains (maybe cheap ones) have alot of lateral deflection capability.

Another idea is to twist the chain and check ability to rotate. That test went a little more as expected. The older chain rotated significantly more than the newer chain.

Just a couple of simple ideas.
...and there's always the chain checker...
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Just sayin'...😎
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
A method I have used for larger industrial chanis is to periodically check the lateral deflection. Push sideways on the chain with your thumb. When deflection increases noticeably, significant wear has occurred and it is time to change the chain.

It might work with bicycle chains but I just tried it on my 10 year old mountain bike that had huge ability to latterly deflect vs. my wifes newer cruiser. They were similar! Bike chains (maybe cheap ones) have alot of lateral deflection capability.
Bicycle chain for derailleurs is a lot more flexible sideways than industrial chain. Even the 5 sprocket chain which was the same dimension as an industrial chain (1/4" wide, 1/2" long) was more flexible.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
The Brose mid-drives have full-sized chainrings. Mine is a 48t. I haven't noticed any degreaser dripping off he chainring. Motors with smaller drive cogs (as small as 18t apparently) might be more of a concern.
Ahh good point. Thanks for sharing.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
The Brose mid-drives have full-sized chainrings. Mine is a 48t. I haven't noticed any degreaser dripping off he chainring. Motors with smaller drive cogs (as small as 18t apparently) might be more of a concern.
Have not noticed any dripping as well. I always follow-up with a water bath inside my chain cleaner reservoir to ensure no residue is left behind.