The ultimate pedal and shoes discussion

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
A very helpful thread. Anyone here tried the pedaling innovations catalyst pedals? If so, your thoughts are appreciated. The creator has referenced interesting articles on his website. Happy cycling!

Very Interesting design idea, however, the pedals seem a bit pricy for $129 USD. ;)


For those who have TLDR ADD... this is the visual summary of the Pedal Manifesto.

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Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
A very helpful thread. Anyone here tried the pedaling innovations catalyst pedals? If so, your thoughts are appreciated. The creator has referenced interesting articles on his website. Happy cycling!

He says he lifts at the gym in bare feet. Well, if he lifts in bare feet he has the stiff floor for support. But then he argues against stiff cycling shoes as a way to sell his pedals? It does not quite make sense to me.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have been using the pedaling innovations catalyst pedal on both my bikes for the past year and would never use anything else. Being able to wear regular shoes instead of stiff bike shoes is huge, so much more shoes to chose from. I use Salomon Trail Runners, the goretex ones in the winter.

The pedals really do allow one to apply more power to the crank, better acceleration and sustained speed.

They come with long and short pins. I use the longs. They will chew up your shins if you are not careful. After a bloody month or so you learn to avoid them while walking the bike.

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Over50

Well-Known Member
For commuting I've gone for the slimmest platform pedals I can find - Origen8 Slimlines:
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For shoes, I wanted a shoe that was good for the bike and good for the office. I didn't want to haul two pairs of shoes. Fortunately my employer allows jeans so stylish bmx or skateboard shoes are a good fit for the application of bike commute, office, plenty of walking. The best I've found, which have soles that are rigid enough and strong enough to take the spikes on the platform pedals, are the Etnies with the soles made of Michelin rubber. And they are very reasonably priced. I have about 4 pairs in various colors and I can about match all of my jeans or corduroy office worthy pants.
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tallpaul

Active Member
I have been using the pedaling innovations catalyst pedal on both my bikes


The Alaskan turned me on to these pedals. Terrific upgrade. As the Alaskan says the size allows more power to the cranks, evens pressure across your foot, and adds stability. Only pedal I'll ever use now!
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
I have been using the pedaling innovations catalyst pedal on both my bikes for the past year and would never use anything else. Being able to wear regular shoes instead of stiff bike shoes is huge, so much more shoes to chose from. I use Salomon Trail Runners, the goretex ones in the winter.

The pedals really do allow one to apply more power to the crank, better acceleration and sustained speed.

They come with long and short pins. I use the longs. They will chew up your shins if you are not careful. After a bloody month or so you learn to avoid them while walking the bike.

View attachment 44877
Love the polished wood fenders on your bike. Have you tried using nylon pedal pins instead of metal to reduce the loss of blood? ;)
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I have been using the pedaling innovations catalyst pedal on both my bikes for the past year and would never use anything else. Being able to wear regular shoes instead of stiff bike shoes is huge, so much more shoes to chose from. I use Salomon Trail Runners, the goretex ones in the winter.

The pedals really do allow one to apply more power to the crank, better acceleration and sustained speed.

They come with long and short pins. I use the longs. They will chew up your shins if you are not careful. After a bloody month or so you learn to avoid them while walking the bike.

View attachment 44877
@Alaskan! Your R&M is sooo sexy! Care to name the model? I will be saving to get one!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I'll never buy Bontrager components again! Some time ago, I bought me wide Bontrager Satellite flat pedals. I tried them with winter mountain boots. It was all wrong! My boots were slipping off the pedals to the level I might collapse when starting from the lights! Perhaps these pedals are appropriate for wearing trainers on dry warm weather but now I do hate them... Sticking with Stamp 7 and the Specialized "sandpaper" ones.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Too late, David 🤣 I rode those pedals in the Summer in soft trainers. Maybe, a gift to someone?
At the moment, I'm giving my SPD-SL the last chance. It is a sunny sunny day, such a waste not to ride out!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I have got convinced to the clipless pedals as long as they are of the MTB type, allow easy shoe release and allow riding on the platform side of the pedal. Just fancy you need to make manoeuvres at low speed (doing a U-turn, for example) or need to start from the lights fast - the flat/platform pedal is ideal for that.

Here, Shimano SH-56 cleats are used; these allow shoe release by moving the heel outwards, inwards or upwards. The pedal is PD-M324 and shoes are SH-MT301.

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David Berry

Well-Known Member
You may remember my bad experiences with road SPD pedals. I replaced… with the SM-SH56 cleats which are released by outward, inward or upward heel movement.

I could have fallen for three times on the day; in any case, the shoe was released before any disaster might have happened. I'm in love with this system!
It's more than a year since I last clipped my feet into pedals. If I am ever tempted to do so again, it will be using my Shimano's SM-SH56 cleats. Unless I am sprinting, standing on the pedals or hauling on the upward stroke (no to all, I must admit) they are the way to go. Maybe, I should just try them again!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
It's more than a year since I last clipped my feet into pedals. If I am ever tempted to do so again, it will be using my Shimano's SM-SH56 cleats. Unless I am sprinting, standing on the pedals or hauling on the upward stroke (no to all, I must admit) they are the way to go. Maybe, I should just try them again!
I fell in love with the Shimano PD-M324 pedals, SH-56 cleats and MT301 shoes. I intend to keep the pedals permanently on my Vado until my girlfriend Brix comes from London to join me for a longer time; then I will pass the Vado to her with regular flat pedals.

I have found this specific Shimano system very safe and efficient. My pedals are set to the Weakest Position; it is so easy to clip in and release! It has turned out my brother Jacek has exactly the same pedals and cleats on his top-level MTB. However, he set his springs harder. The reason is, Jacek likes jumping on his bike and he cannot let his shoes release while his heels are going up.

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PD-M324

Besides, I washed Vado in a car-wash today. 99% of washing was done on low-pressure water and I only removed the worst debris from the different stays under high pressure. Later, I treated the drive-train with WD-40 Bike.
 
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Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
Always a hot topic! Like Fender or Gibson over in my other obsession (I split the difference and go PRS).

I was always a clipless SPD guy in my 20 plus riding years on various touring and road bikes back in the dawn of time. Five years off the bike when I came back into it, the only thing that had changed was my old SPD shoes were too small, I made the jump to ebikes fairly quickly after realizing that the years had removed a lot of the fun from it. Once on the ebike I also realized that my old reflexes were different and maybe flat pedals were a safer and smarter bet.

I mean, I’ve worshipped at the altar of “Pedal In Circles, Not Squares”... had earned lots of war wounds from tipping over before unclipping, most spectacularly on a four lane road when my road bike‘s front tire went into a seam in the concrete and stayed there, putting me on the ground at 15 miles per hour in heavy traffic.

Now in this new era, late 60s on blood thinners, maybe it ain’t such a good idea. I run very large flat pedals and usually sandals with very firm soles. Small, short pins on the pedals. I still sort of miss the solid feel of being attached to the bike sometimes, but I also do enough rough ground riding that I want to be able to disengage without thinking about it also.

But like with the guitars, everyone has their own views and it’s all good. Except that I can never understand how anyone stood on a stage for three hours with a damn Les Paul pulling them down into hell at 9 or 10 pounds!
 
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Oberst

Member
Always a hot topic! Like Fender or Gibson over in my other obsession (I split the difference and go PRS).

I was always a clipless SPD guy in my 20 plus riding years on various touring and road bikes back in the dawn of time. Five years off the bike when I came back into it, the only thing that had changed was my old SPD shoes were too small, I made the jump to ebikes fairly quickly after realizing that the years had removed a lot of the fun from it. Once on the ebike I also realized that my old reflexes were different and maybe flat pedals were a safer and smarter bet.

I mean, I’ve worshipped at the alter of “Pedal In Circles, Not Squares”... had earned lots of war wounds from tipping over before unclipping, most spectacularly on a four lane road when my road bike‘s front tire went into a seam in the concrete and stayed there, putting me on the ground at 15 miles per hour in heavy traffic.

Now in this new era, late 60s on blood thinners, maybe it ain’t such a good idea. I run very large flat pedals and usually sandals with very firm soles. Small, short pins on the pedals. I still sort of miss the solid feel of being attached to the bike sometimes, but I also do enough rough ground riding that I want to be able to disengage without thinking about it also.

But like with the guitars, everyone has their own views and it’s all good. Except that I can never understand how anyone stood on a stage for three hours with a damn Les Paul pulling them down into hell at 9 or 10 pounds!
I guess I am Rickenbacker then. I go Look SPD pedals except for Shimano road pedals on my e road bike!