The "UNOFFICIAL" Hydra FAQ thread....

Csubi

Member
Region
Canada
@Csubi - welcome to EBR!

You can buy what ever chainring you desire; I recommend Narrow/Wide. But you might not be able to fit anything larger than 44T…. (In the thread above!)

Next please learn and use the search tool! We are not here to answer your questions without you doing some basic searches first. Then be sure to contribute back to the community…
-BB
Sorry to cause an issue. I truly thought my questions were fitting for an FAQ. Considering this product will take off and many people doing research could refer to it here.

I'll be mindful moving forward, and deleted my post.
 

onlineaddy

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Sorry to cause an issue. I truly thought my questions were fitting for an FAQ. Considering this product will take off and many people doing research could refer to it here.

I'll be mindful moving forward, and deleted my post.
You did not cause an issue. People are free to respond (or not).

Having said that, there is indeed a wealth of information contained in the forums. Lots of reading to do, if you're so inclined. Good luck!
 

BarnBoy

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pleasanton, CA
Sorry to cause an issue. I truly thought my questions were fitting for an FAQ. Considering this product will take off and many people doing research could refer to it here.

I'll be mindful moving forward, and deleted my post.
@Csubi -Not sure why you purposely did something like that. Now future people will come in this thread and ask WTF was that all about….

I’m sorry to have hurt your feelings (aka ❄️!!). All I asked is for you (and others!) to use the search tool for your questions; it is simple and works well in this crazy organized forum. If you can’t find it; as I gave a clear example here, then ask….

I created the FAQ’s because I know WW is going to be big someday and @pushkar frick’n rocks! I donated my time to create them as I too wanted to know this stuff too and then saw the build pattern for all models. Most of the FAQ info is @pushkar via PM/tests/emails and WW Web pages, and the rest is this WW forum searches all gathered in the notes I made helping me make my particular purchase decision (so that means scattered Pushkar’s posts!)…

But now more importantly for EBR, please do not cry and go away all mad/sad/whatever. Please help the community….

How can you make EBR better???
-BB
 

Csubi

Member
Region
Canada
@Csubi -Not sure why you purposely did something like that. Now future people will come in this thread and ask WTF was that all about….

I’m sorry to have hurt your feelings (aka ❄️!!). All I asked is for you (and others!) to use the search tool for your questions; it is simple and works well in this crazy organized forum. If you can’t find it; as I gave a clear example here, then ask….

I created the FAQ’s because I know WW is going to be big someday and @pushkar frick’n rocks! I donated my time to create them as I too wanted to know this stuff too and then saw the build pattern for all models. Most of the FAQ info is @pushkar via PM/tests/emails and WW Web pages, and the rest is this WW forum searches all gathered in the notes I made helping me make my particular purchase decision (so that means scattered Pushkar’s posts!)…

But now more importantly for EBR, please do not cry and go away all mad/sad/whatever. Please help the community….

How can you make EBR better???
-BB
LOL. Not mad. Just tried to own up and fix my mistake.
Not going anywhere.
I'll use the search function more effectively.
Future WW fans will read, laugh, say "WTF," and then say "note to self.... use search"

*Also, it takes a wee bit more to hurt my feelings. Forum / online things are never personal.
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
@Csubi -Not sure why you purposely did something like that. Now future people will come in this thread and ask WTF was that all about….

I’m sorry to have hurt your feelings (aka ❄️!!). All I asked is for you (and others!) to use the search tool for your questions; it is simple and works well in this crazy organized forum. If you can’t find it; as I gave a clear example here, then ask….

I created the FAQ’s because I know WW is going to be big someday and @pushkar frick’n rocks! I donated my time to create them as I too wanted to know this stuff too and then saw the build pattern for all models. Most of the FAQ info is @pushkar via PM/tests/emails and WW Web pages, and the rest is this WW forum searches all gathered in the notes I made helping me make my particular purchase decision (so that means scattered Pushkar’s posts!)…

But now more importantly for EBR, please do not cry and go away all mad/sad/whatever. Please help the community….

How can you make EBR better???
-BB
you meanie!🦨
 

Fast n' Furious

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
You are recommending this before reading the "Q & A", or the "Comments".
Question:
"Will the bracket fit over a regular axle (what is the diameter of the hole?). If not, is there a model that will? Thank you"
Answer:
"If you have an old quick release, it should work. If you have a through axle, it probably won't fit. I bought this for my bicycle, with a through axle thinking it would work, but the hole in the mount is too small. I don't have a big enough drill bit to drill it out."
By railfan on April 26, 2020
"... the mount is made of plastic I am afraid of breaking it".
By Sanjay on August 10, 2021
Question:
"So how is it 'adjustable' ? and i'm not referring to just folding it in half. i mean, can you adjust the height somehow ? it's not obvious, from pics"
Answer:
"It is a little wonky in the angle. You could adjust the height by cutting the rod.
By Douglas Schwab on May 15, 2019".

2.0 out of 5 stars Just didn't work for me
Reviewed in the United States on November 22, 2020
Verified Purchase
"I'm trying to find a solution for a fat tire bike with oversized tubing. I don't need much stability, but this isn't even close. The small diameter of the kickstand itself isn't going to work on any other surface other than pavement. It needs a big end on it to stop it from sinking into dirt. The storage process also isn't ideal for mountain bikes. I had low expectations of this item, but these aren't a good solution."
4.0 out of 5 stars Works on my bike.
Reviewed in the United States on May 8, 2020
Verified Purchase
Its well made but not as solid as a traditional kick stand. Its placement on the rear axel means you have to be able to turn the front wheel to the right in order to stabilize it. a traditional kickstands leverage point it mid frame by the pedals so its easier to balance the bike. This one is far to the rear on the axel so it makes the bike a bit more tippy. Laws of physics apply to us all. LOL Overall its a nice gadget.
"The only drawback I found is that it is not retractable. You have to remove it and clamp it into the holder. On the bright side if you want to use it into a ultra light road bike it will add no weight because you can remove it."

Overall - other than (Manufacturer's reply on that: haha, now buy a whole new one) cheap "plastic"; the lack of adjustment (bend it? WOW!); having to remove it to ride the bike and the lack of a base that will hold in dirt, the satisfied customers all have light weight bicycles - like under 40lbs
"My mtb is roughly 35 pounds and this holds it up well".
"This is perfect. Hold up my Giant +-25lb bike well being all steel".
"No seriously it works. My kickstand is installed on an older steel framed Trek 400 and I just used the stand today with a bag pannier full of beer and the bike didn’t topple over"
. Here's his photo (below). 8 cans of beer? LOL!
Customer image

That's not a "big pannier full of beer".
This (below) is a "big pannier full of beer".
Note the bike's stand is holding 80+lbs of groceries and Beer, a couple reds and chardonnays - and it simply won't tip over.
Oh my, and that's me running 'light'. I have identical panniers for the front - simply lock out the fork.
1633539493075.jpeg
BEER?
For a quick run, I easily tote a 12'ver in a front basket (fork locked) and another strapped to the rear rack
1633539956893.jpeg
1633539678875.jpeg

It's all about 'form fits function'. A Hydra's form does not fit a 'commuter' or a 'cargo bike's' function.
Oh sure. You can buy a new ZR1 Vette and turn it into a dump truck. I saw a Jeep Cherokee 4wd with a 4 cam 4.5 liter Lambo V12 in Harrah's museum. A UC Pro/ Crosstour cannot be a Hydra and a Hydra cannot be UC Pro/ Crosstour. If Hydra owners are talking about a quick occasional jaunt to the 7-11, use a backpack. Gee, who'da thunk it?
You can add a bags on the bars, even a detachable basket (but not like mine, unless you move WW's display mount, now hogging that space), but your'e still de-tuning a masterpiece to create a truck.
You add fixed weight to the bars, the whole balance changes. A 12-pack, 16ozers weigh 12.51lbs + the cans.
No big deal? Well it's fixed weight in a spot higher than your center of gravity and when you change that, by lifting out of the seat you will find you have much less the control because the the change effects you exponentially as the axis changes.
I carry that and 1/2 gallon of milk, and qt of 1/2 and 1/2, plus tonight's (chicken) vittles - complete - in my 'basket'. Yawn.
W/ Hydra, even needing a kick-stand you risk ruining the carbon fiber (Hi Rome. How's that 'stripped out carbon' claim going?), you won't be able to tote much, it will degrade the shocks performance, balance and likely void the warranty.
Regarding a kick-stand (now that I've looked at a typical Ultra bracket-mount closely), there are several obvious candidates on the motor's bottom bolts for a "U" shaped bracket that will mount any of a number of Ursa's stands. You will however, be adding 2 - 3 lbs to the weight and
people afraid of a screwdriver are at the mercy of any fool's word - so they should forget it - but more importantly, a manufacturer's not going to sell parts (an HD kick-stand mount) that do not fit the form's function, so best not to mount stuff.
Since it's already an exercise in aesthetic nihilism, just carry a block of wood - or set the bike on a 12er.

As, FnF as usual.
 

blueskyca

Member
You are recommending this before reading the "Q & A", or the "Comments".
Question:
"Will the bracket fit over a regular axle (what is the diameter of the hole?). If not, is there a model that will? Thank you"
Answer:
"If you have an old quick release, it should work. If you have a through axle, it probably won't fit. I bought this for my bicycle, with a through axle thinking it would work, but the hole in the mount is too small. I don't have a big enough drill bit to drill it out."
By railfan on April 26, 2020
"... the mount is made of plastic I am afraid of breaking it".
By Sanjay on August 10, 2021
Question:
"So how is it 'adjustable' ? and i'm not referring to just folding it in half. i mean, can you adjust the height somehow ? it's not obvious, from pics"
Answer:
"It is a little wonky in the angle. You could adjust the height by cutting the rod.
By Douglas Schwab on May 15, 2019".

2.0 out of 5 stars Just didn't work for me
Reviewed in the United States on November 22, 2020
Verified Purchase
"I'm trying to find a solution for a fat tire bike with oversized tubing. I don't need much stability, but this isn't even close. The small diameter of the kickstand itself isn't going to work on any other surface other than pavement. It needs a big end on it to stop it from sinking into dirt. The storage process also isn't ideal for mountain bikes. I had low expectations of this item, but these aren't a good solution."
4.0 out of 5 stars Works on my bike.
Reviewed in the United States on May 8, 2020
Verified Purchase
Its well made but not as solid as a traditional kick stand. Its placement on the rear axel means you have to be able to turn the front wheel to the right in order to stabilize it. a traditional kickstands leverage point it mid frame by the pedals so its easier to balance the bike. This one is far to the rear on the axel so it makes the bike a bit more tippy. Laws of physics apply to us all. LOL Overall its a nice gadget.
"The only drawback I found is that it is not retractable. You have to remove it and clamp it into the holder. On the bright side if you want to use it into a ultra light road bike it will add no weight because you can remove it."

Overall - other than (Manufacturer's reply on that: haha, now buy a whole new one) cheap "plastic"; the lack of adjustment (bend it? WOW!); having to remove it to ride the bike and the lack of a base that will hold in dirt, the satisfied customers all have light weight bicycles - like under 40lbs
"My mtb is roughly 35 pounds and this holds it up well".
"This is perfect. Hold up my Giant +-25lb bike well being all steel".
"No seriously it works. My kickstand is installed on an older steel framed Trek 400 and I just used the stand today with a bag pannier full of beer and the bike didn’t topple over"
. Here's his photo (below). 8 cans of beer? LOL!
Customer image

That's not a "big pannier full of beer".
This (below) is a "big pannier full of beer".
Note the bike's stand is holding 80+lbs of groceries and Beer, a couple reds and chardonnays - and it simply won't tip over.
Oh my, and that's me running 'light'. I have identical panniers for the front - simply lock out the fork.
View attachment 102475 BEER?
For a quick run, I easily tote a 12'ver in a front basket (fork locked) and another strapped to the rear rack
View attachment 102481 View attachment 102476
It's all about 'form fits function'. A Hydra's form does not fit a 'commuter' or a 'cargo bike's' function.
Oh sure. You can buy a new ZR1 Vette and turn it into a dump truck. I saw a Jeep Cherokee 4wd with a 4 cam 4.5 liter Lambo V12 in Harrah's museum. A UC Pro/ Crosstour cannot be a Hydra and a Hydra cannot be UC Pro/ Crosstour. If Hydra owners are talking about a quick occasional jaunt to the 7-11, use a backpack. Gee, who'da thunk it?
You can add a bags on the bars, even a detachable basket (but not like mine, unless you move WW's display mount, now hogging that space), but your'e still de-tuning a masterpiece to create a truck.
You add fixed weight to the bars, the whole balance changes. A 12-pack, 16ozers weigh 12.51lbs + the cans.
No big deal? Well it's fixed weight in a spot higher than your center of gravity and when you change that, by lifting out of the seat you will find you have much less the control because the the change effects you exponentially as the axis changes.
I carry that and 1/2 gallon of milk, and qt of 1/2 and 1/2, plus tonight's (chicken) vittles - complete - in my 'basket'. Yawn.
W/ Hydra, even needing a kick-stand you risk ruining the carbon fiber (Hi Rome. How's that 'stripped out carbon' claim going?), you won't be able to tote much, it will degrade the shocks performance, balance and likely void the warranty.
Regarding a kick-stand (now that I've looked at a typical Ultra bracket-mount closely), there are several obvious candidates on the motor's bottom bolts for a "U" shaped bracket that will mount any of a number of Ursa's stands. You will however, be adding 2 - 3 lbs to the weight and
people afraid of a screwdriver are at the mercy of any fool's word - so they should forget it - but more importantly, a manufacturer's not going to sell parts (an HD kick-stand mount) that do not fit the form's function, so best not to mount stuff.
Since it's already an exercise in aesthetic nihilism, just carry a block of wood - or set the bike on a 12er.

As, FnF as usual.
Just about all these DIY Chinese products need/benefit from simple mods, like drilling a larger axle hole or trimming the shaft length.
 

J10001

New Member
Region
USA
I picked mine up from WW this past weekend. I was able to ride around today for a bit and initial impressions are excellent. I'm 6 ft and got a large frame. It is a big bike but the frame fits well. I ride with the dropper post almost fully extended (maybe a couple of inches left to extend) so for someone 6 ft. 3 I could see height being an issue on a medium frame.

The Kindernay is great so far. I live in Brooklyn and being able to shift at a stop is infinitely better than dealing with a derailleur where, if you have to stop suddenly and didn't have time to downshift, you're stuck rolling the bike forward slowly in the wrong gear. You have to let off the power a little bit with any e-bike while shifting so I don't view the requirements of pedaling with a Kindernay as any different. I like having the extra gear range. Reviews of the new 7-speed Kindernay suggest 14 is overkill for an e-bike, but given you can switch 3 gears at a time, using the full range is no issue and I like having more gear options. The Kindery does make noise at all times whether coasting or pedaling. It doesn't bother me, but isn't silent like a derailleur when you pedaling under power.

The handlebars are a bit wide, but I haven't owned a modern mountain bike so the size takes getting used to. I also have a Yamaha cross-connect. On city streets, the bigger wheels and full suspension are great - you can ride up and down curbs and barely notice. I'm very happy with Schwable supermotos for city riding. Good grip and riding is smooth. I suspect if I took it on any trails I'd be a little nervous about losing grip under heavier power so will try real treads if I take it in the mountains.

The throttle is probably unnecessary and I'd rather omit it and avoid having the extra cable at the front. I sent Pushkar the smaller 500c Bafang display to install and am very happy with it. The plastic screen cover seems somewhat cheap and has gotten scratched already. The seat is hard - I have a bony butt and it's sore from my limited riding - so I may try to find something softer.

I will probably ride no higher than 2 in most settings. 3 is fun and 4-5 you're just burning extra power to little benefit riding around the city. You can get to 30-35 mph very easily on level 3. I look forward to trying the Onesie Kindernay shifter, but the dual shifters are fine - it would just be nice to clean up the handlebars. If you fully press the shifters to shift 3 gears at once, they slightly rub the brake levers but it isn't an issue.

When the motor kicks in, you feel an ever so slight sideways pull on the rear frame. I've felt this with motorcycles before and believe it's just the power being run through the chain (not a bad thing just noting the power). Without the battery, the bike is a very reasonable weight. With the battery, it's heavy but not overly so. While riding, it is very maneuvrable. The clicking in and removing the battery isn't a satisfying as the Yamaha locking system and doesn't feel quite as secure but it works fine.

My left brake line bottoms out more easily than the right. It sounds like someone had a similar issue and it probably needs to be bled.

All in all, I'm extremely happy with the bike and can't wait to try it on some trails. I've tried to give my stream of consciousness impressions so far.

I believe the color is elite midnight. It looks almost black but in sunlight looks more blue.

image_16848129.JPG
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Thanks for taking the time and effort to put together that great personal review. It gives me a lot of insight into what I might enjoy about mine.

The Kindernay shifting at a stand still will come in handy for me on the trails.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I picked mine up from WW this past weekend. I was able to ride around today for a bit and initial impressions are excellent. I'm 6 ft and got a large frame. It is a big bike but the frame fits well. I ride with the dropper post almost fully extended (maybe a couple of inches left to extend) so for someone 6 ft. 3 I could see height being an issue on a medium frame.

The Kindernay is great so far. I live in Brooklyn and being able to shift at a stop is infinitely better than dealing with a derailleur where, if you have to stop suddenly and didn't have time to downshift, you're stuck rolling the bike forward slowly in the wrong gear. You have to let off the power a little bit with any e-bike while shifting so I don't view the requirements of pedaling with a Kindernay as any different. I like having the extra gear range. Reviews of the new 7-speed Kindernay suggest 14 is overkill for an e-bike, but given you can switch 3 gears at a time, using the full range is no issue and I like having more gear options. The Kindery does make noise at all times whether coasting or pedaling. It doesn't bother me, but isn't silent like a derailleur when you pedaling under power.

The handlebars are a bit wide, but I haven't owned a modern mountain bike so the size takes getting used to. I also have a Yamaha cross-connect. On city streets, the bigger wheels and full suspension are great - you can ride up and down curbs and barely notice. I'm very happy with Schwable supermotos for city riding. Good grip and riding is smooth. I suspect if I took it on any trails I'd be a little nervous about losing grip under heavier power so will try real treads if I take it in the mountains.

The throttle is probably unnecessary and I'd rather omit it and avoid having the extra cable at the front. I sent Pushkar the smaller 500c Bafang display to install and am very happy with it. The plastic screen cover seems somewhat cheap and has gotten scratched already. The seat is hard - I have a bony butt and it's sore from my limited riding - so I may try to find something softer.

I will probably ride no higher than 2 in most settings. 3 is fun and 4-5 you're just burning extra power to little benefit riding around the city. You can get to 30-35 mph very easily on level 3. I look forward to trying the Onesie Kindernay shifter, but the dual shifters are fine - it would just be nice to clean up the handlebars. If you fully press the shifters to shift 3 gears at once, they slightly rub the brake levers but it isn't an issue.

When the motor kicks in, you feel an ever so slight sideways pull on the rear frame. I've felt this with motorcycles before and believe it's just the power being run through the chain (not a bad thing just noting the power). Without the battery, the bike is a very reasonable weight. With the battery, it's heavy but not overly so. While riding, it is very maneuvrable. The clicking in and removing the battery isn't a satisfying as the Yamaha locking system and doesn't feel quite as secure but it works fine.

My left brake line bottoms out more easily than the right. It sounds like someone had a similar issue and it probably needs to be bled.

All in all, I'm extremely happy with the bike and can't wait to try it on some trails. I've tried to give my stream of consciousness impressions so far.

I believe the color is elite midnight. It looks almost black but in sunlight looks more blue.

View attachment 102517
Ohh, your post was the one I was trying to find last night. As I understand it wide handlebars can be addressed by pulling the grips and many are pre marked so you can cut them shorter accurately.

Thursday I was riding a fairly new bike with wide handlebars and noticed I "choke up" on them by holding my hands in as far as possible on the grips. I'm going to go with a different handlebar that is a bit higher and closer to my seat. Then I'll cut that one to proper width.
 

greeno

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
J10001 I'm pretty sure the dropper post should be extended it's full length when in your normal riding position. If you still have a couple of inches lefty probably need a smaller travel post so your not messing with getting the correct height when it extends back up after dropping it all the way down. A friend gave me an older 170mm dropper way back when and it was about 2" to long and it was a pain to always try to adjust it back to the correct height so I swapped it out to a 120mm post and never have to think twice about it.
As far as bars and risers are concerned a lot of "New" bikes come standard with 785mm or so longer bars and the customer is expected to cut them to fit. I think I cut about an inch of of each side of mine so their around 736mm or pretty close. Works good for my wingspan.
Fork steerer tubes sometimes come long to in cases a taller person needs to space up the stem for a better fit. Better to have the xtra lengths on those items so you don't have to buy something 1/2" longer to fit correctly. After its cut it's cut.
 

Acme

Well-Known Member
in my opinion. If you can’t mount a 6” dropper post low enough so that it retracts and extends completely at your desired highest riding position your frame is likely too large. Riders with an inseam over 34” can benefit from a 7” or 8” dropper.
 

Fast n' Furious

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
I picked mine up from WW this past weekend. I was able to ride around today for a bit and initial impressions are excellent. I'm 6 ft and got a large frame. It is a big bike but the frame fits well. I ride with the dropper post almost fully extended (maybe a couple of inches left to extend) so for someone 6 ft. 3 I could see height being an issue on a medium frame.

The Kindernay is great so far. I live in Brooklyn and being able to shift at a stop is infinitely better than dealing with a derailleur where, if you have to stop suddenly and didn't have time to downshift, you're stuck rolling the bike forward slowly in the wrong gear. You have to let off the power a little bit with any e-bike while shifting so I don't view the requirements of pedaling with a Kindernay as any different. I like having the extra gear range. Reviews of the new 7-speed Kindernay suggest 14 is overkill for an e-bike, but given you can switch 3 gears at a time, using the full range is no issue and I like having more gear options. The Kindery does make noise at all times whether coasting or pedaling. It doesn't bother me, but isn't silent like a derailleur when you pedaling under power.

The handlebars are a bit wide, but I haven't owned a modern mountain bike so the size takes getting used to. I also have a Yamaha cross-connect. On city streets, the bigger wheels and full suspension are great - you can ride up and down curbs and barely notice. I'm very happy with Schwable supermotos for city riding. Good grip and riding is smooth. I suspect if I took it on any trails I'd be a little nervous about losing grip under heavier power so will try real treads if I take it in the mountains.

The throttle is probably unnecessary and I'd rather omit it and avoid having the extra cable at the front. I sent Pushkar the smaller 500c Bafang display to install and am very happy with it. The plastic screen cover seems somewhat cheap and has gotten scratched already. The seat is hard - I have a bony butt and it's sore from my limited riding - so I may try to find something softer.

I will probably ride no higher than 2 in most settings. 3 is fun and 4-5 you're just burning extra power to little benefit riding around the city. You can get to 30-35 mph very easily on level 3. I look forward to trying the Onesie Kindernay shifter, but the dual shifters are fine - it would just be nice to clean up the handlebars. If you fully press the shifters to shift 3 gears at once, they slightly rub the brake levers but it isn't an issue.

When the motor kicks in, you feel an ever so slight sideways pull on the rear frame. I've felt this with motorcycles before and believe it's just the power being run through the chain (not a bad thing just noting the power). Without the battery, the bike is a very reasonable weight. With the battery, it's heavy but not overly so. While riding, it is very maneuvrable. The clicking in and removing the battery isn't a satisfying as the Yamaha locking system and doesn't feel quite as secure but it works fine.

My left brake line bottoms out more easily than the right. It sounds like someone had a similar issue and it probably needs to be bled.

All in all, I'm extremely happy with the bike and can't wait to try it on some trails. I've tried to give my stream of consciousness impressions so far.

I believe the color is elite midnight. It looks almost black but in sunlight looks more blue.

View attachment 102517
Very nice. Even the Fox stuff.
Are you regulated or did you buy before/ after the warning that: 'deregulating the throttle voids the KXIV's warranty' after 30 days?
What's your take on that? Completely blew me off on that hub, cuz: I keep hearing these 'covert implications' K XIV's are blowing out from failure to the drop throttle when shifting.
Except all the 'verified' problems I read about are it leaking - which also takes months to ship to Norway, by Caribou or some %$#(*&.
If the 'implication' is true, you address how to not use the throttle, but please tell me how the Torque Sensor knows to back off when you come to a near stop (as I will describe) ?
Yeah, with a derailleur one has to be quick and coordinated coming to a stop, ending in the correct gear.
'Almost stops' that turn into 'stops' and coping with sudden reactions to changing obstacles distracts my brain from the automated task of shifting (I can hear the crew that cut it's teeth on pedals laughing at me).
K XIV lacks any indicator. So, you're cruising (say at 30mph) in 14th gear and have to suddenly decelerate to what may well be a stop in your perception (car running stop sign), but at 10mph that changes (car sees you and stops).
Q: What gear are you in?
K'nay's A: Just start clicking (three gears at a time) and testing the water with little pumps of the pedals (w/o a throttle).
Oops, that's not it - jerk. Oops that's not it either - jerk, jerk. Are we there yet?
That's dandy for a low geared off-road superbike where you're always (you better be) on top of the shifting (and rarely at 30mph) - unless a Moose steps out on the trail or something - but (as you well know - and a big Hello to Brooklyn, NY USA!!!) Big City driving is like a police shooting course with those pop-up targets, except we are the targets.
So, cassette or that IGH, it's six to one or 1/2 dozen, etc. which brings up something I discovered right away when drooling over the possibility we could have 7, instead of 14 gears: The 7 speed's ratio is a good bit lower than the XIV's. Also, the 'two-sie' is about $500.
Really glad to see a gladiator bringing a capable contender to the City Street-fights
Congratulate you on your taste
Amazing, that machine will achieve 35mph w/ a 39T ring!
How do you pedal that fast, considering you don't have any use for the throttle? lol
My lesser beast runs a 46T (roughly 18% larger than yours) and my low is also 11T.
Full throttle, pedaling like a demented sewing machine I can hit 30-31mph.
That motor has insane 'legs'. Adding a 46T would mean 41mph - which is what I hear quoted for the UC w/ Gates.
And you can feel the centrifugal torque twisting the frame huh? That's some serious power.
Thank you for taking the time to share.
Just about all these DIY Chinese products need/benefit from simple mods, like drilling a larger axle hole or trimming the shaft length.
My experience is different: Items rated for lightweight bicycles do not work on big-dog e-bikes - no matter where they come from.
The companies that make proper kick-stands for a 30kilo machine are not in China. Mainly they're Italians.
You can take a 3" washer, file to the shape you want, drill &/or tap threads and mount nearly any stand, but you'll be stuck with that silly position, trailing off the rear axle, so now you need an adapter to make it removable.
Even normal rear kickstands fall over - a lot. But it might work, for 4 brews (lol) - except Hydra's have no provision for panniers - or a reasonable rear rack.
Like a roof mounted luggage carrier on a Lamborghini Mura, or a snowplow on a Rolls Corniche, it's completely out of character or taste on this near full-race beast.
The real solution is obvious - as related to me after inheriting Brock Glover's insanely tuned personal 1986 Mako 250, when I asked 'what do you do when you stop?' - Your not supposed to stop.
If I was determined, I'd simply carry a plastic block stowed in my handlebar bag when I went shopping on Rodeo Drive.

Fn'F
 

J10001

New Member
Region
USA
Very nice. Even the Fox stuff.
Are you regulated or did you buy before/ after the warning that: 'deregulating the throttle voids the KXIV's warranty' after 30 days?
What's your take on that? Completely blew me off on that hub, cuz: I keep hearing these 'covert implications' K XIV's are blowing out from failure to the drop throttle when shifting.
Except all the 'verified' problems I read about are it leaking - which also takes months to ship to Norway, by Caribou or some %$#(*&.
If the 'implication' is true, you address how to not use the throttle, but please tell me how the Torque Sensor knows to back off when you come to a near stop (as I will describe) ?
Yeah, with a derailleur one has to be quick and coordinated coming to a stop, ending in the correct gear.
'Almost stops' that turn into 'stops' and coping with sudden reactions to changing obstacles distracts my brain from the automated task of shifting (I can hear the crew that cut it's teeth on pedals laughing at me).
K XIV lacks any indicator. So, you're cruising (say at 30mph) in 14th gear and have to suddenly decelerate to what may well be a stop in your perception (car running stop sign), but at 10mph that changes (car sees you and stops).
Q: What gear are you in?
K'nay's A: Just start clicking (three gears at a time) and testing the water with little pumps of the pedals (w/o a throttle).
Oops, that's not it - jerk. Oops that's not it either - jerk, jerk. Are we there yet?
That's dandy for a low geared off-road superbike where you're always (you better be) on top of the shifting (and rarely at 30mph) - unless a Moose steps out on the trail or something - but (as you well know - and a big Hello to Brooklyn, NY USA!!!) Big City driving is like a police shooting course with those pop-up targets, except we are the targets.
So, cassette or that IGH, it's six to one or 1/2 dozen, etc. which brings up something I discovered right away when drooling over the possibility we could have 7, instead of 14 gears: The 7 speed's ratio is a good bit lower than the XIV's. Also, the 'two-sie' is about $500.
Really glad to see a gladiator bringing a capable contender to the City Street-fights
Congratulate you on your taste
Amazing, that machine will achieve 35mph w/ a 39T ring!
How do you pedal that fast, considering you don't have any use for the throttle? lol
My lesser beast runs a 46T (roughly 18% larger than yours) and my low is also 11T.
Full throttle, pedaling like a demented sewing machine I can hit 30-31mph.
That motor has insane 'legs'. Adding a 46T would mean 41mph - which is what I hear quoted for the UC w/ Gates.
And you can feel the centrifugal torque twisting the frame huh? That's some serious power.
Thank you for taking the time to share.

My experience is different: Items rated for lightweight bicycles do not work on big-dog e-bikes - no matter where they come from.
The companies that make proper kick-stands for a 30kilo machine are not in China. Mainly they're Italians.
You can take a 3" washer, file to the shape you want, drill &/or tap threads and mount nearly any stand, but you'll be stuck with that silly position, trailing off the rear axle, so now you need an adapter to make it removable.
Even normal rear kickstands fall over - a lot. But it might work, for 4 brews (lol) - except Hydra's have no provision for panniers - or a reasonable rear rack.
Like a roof mounted luggage carrier on a Lamborghini Mura, or a snowplow on a Rolls Corniche, it's completely out of character or taste on this near full-race beast.
The real solution is obvious - as related to me after inheriting Brock Glover's insanely tuned personal 1986 Mako 250, when I asked 'what do you do when you stop?' - Your not supposed to stop.
If I was determined, I'd simply carry a plastic block stowed in my handlebar bag when I went shopping on Rodeo Drive.

Fn'F
The throttle is nowhere near as powerful as with the pedal assist and I really can't think of a situation where I need or want it. I don't think it's unrestricted but I'm not positive - I base that on the fact that lvl 3 and up feels much more powerful than the throttle. I'd just rather be pedaling than sitting there using a throttle.

The Magura brakes cut the motor as soon as they're pressed at all so the torque sensor doesn't come into play when stopping with brakes. You just get used to the timing of the motor cutting and coming back to power with stopping and starting. Same with getting into the right gear with the Kindernay. After a day or two of riding you intuitively remember which thumb shifter shifts up and down and know whether you were in a "good" gear or not when coming to a stop quickly and pick close to the right as soon as you stop or prepare to move again. When you're riding a motorcycle or driving a stick shift, you don't think in your head "I'm in gear 4" and when you stop or slow down "I was in gear 4 so I should shift to gear 2 to get up this hill" you just shift seamlessly to the correct gear based on feel and getting used to the bike/car.

We'll see about leaking no issues so far. Yes, shipping would be a big pain.

You really aren't pedaling fast to get to the high 20s or 30mph, it's more the effort. Level 1 or 2 will require more effort. Once you hit the speed "wall" with a given level and your own pedaling effort, you can click up to lvl 3 or 4, the motor gives more power and will push you to a slightly higher speed and with the same effort your pedal cadence will go up as well. Not having spent a ton of time yet riding, but cruising in the low to mid-30s probably feels a tad fast for sustained pedal cadence, but realistically if you are off-road or in any sort of urban environment you will not be cruising at 35 mph indefinitely.

I'd liken the shifting experience much more to a motorcyle with the kindernay. You don't have to worry about downshifting which is great, you can get into any gear at a stop, you ease off power while shifting and you learn to keep the motor and gears in a good power band to get around. Starting from a dead stop you run through the gears quickly but while the 7 speed kindernay might have slightly taller gears, I still think it's better to have more gear options across more situations than less shifting because most of your time spent shifting is adjusting a few gears up or down while in motion.