Throttle Starts To Avoid Gear Changes

My Raleigh Detour iE has 8 speeds. When stopping I used to gear down from 8th to 6th or 5th gear so that I'm ready to take off in a lower gear as 8th is too tall from a full stop. Then I thought, why change gears at all? Now unless I'm pointed up a hill, I leave it in 8th, and upon starting I just twist the throttle and gently pedal. By the time the throttle hits 5 or 6 mph the cadence sensing pedal assist has kicked in and I'm gone. Works on Pedago Ridge Rider too cadence sensing on level five.

Any reason not to use this technique?

And I would guess that when my Trek XM 700+ arrives in August this issue takes care of itself because that bike has shift sensors and it will not try to propel me forward while I'm changing gears like the Raleigh.

This whole problem exists because gearing down while stopping is difficult without shift sensors because when you are coming to a stop because you pedal to bring your chain up the cassette to a lower gear, and as a result of your pedaling the cadence sensors are telling the motor to launch you forward which is exactly opposite of the stop you're trying to make. So if you are simply able to leave it in top gear knowing your throttle is going to fill in at launch, problem solved. But I may be missing something basic given my newness to ebikes (around 200 miles) and of course the range drain Grench mentions two post below.

So the shift sensors are not telling the motor no power because I don't have shift sensors, but my brake activation is killing the motor, but it is trick to pull your very grabby left break while shifting with your right hand, and counter intuitive to pedal while breaking.

So how do I the newbie when shifting gears overcome my bike's cadence sensors telling the motor to launch me forward when I pedal during the shift so the chain can find it's next spot on the cassette.
 
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harryS

Well-Known Member
Here's how I look at it. Would you do this without a motor and add the strain to your legs? Why add the extra strain to your motor, even if you help with pedals? That's why we have gears. On the other hand, if you think shifting is tedious, I understand.

Some of us like the work. It's why I still own a six speed manual shift sports car.
 

grench

Well-Known Member
My Raleigh Detour iE has 8 speeds. When stopping I used to gear down from 8th to 6th or 5th gear so that I'm ready to take off in a lower gear as 8th is too tall from a full stop. Then I thought, why change gears at all? Now unless I'm pointed up a hill, I leave it in 8th, and upon starting I just twist the throttle and gently pedal. By the time the throttle hits 5 or 6 mph the cadence sensing pedal assist has kicked in and I'm gone. Works on Pedago Ridge Rider too cadence sensing on level five.

Any reason not to use this technique?
You are drawing lots of current from your battery with this tech. You will experience shorter range. The gears lighten the load on the battery and motor.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Depends on if you are riding for fitness. if so you really need some of that "real bike" strain (though moderated) to get real work in. If just in for fun and don't need the juice you're burning up, have fun. ;)
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Always start pedaling from a stop. Worst battery and controller load is from a dead stop.

Changing gears just takes a second and no effort
 
UPDATE: Spoke to the factory trained mechanic at Pedego Franklin dealership (Nashville). Said he can't speak for other bikes, but on Pedegos that is no problem. The borrowed Pedego Ridge Rider I road and ultimately bought a new one is more powerful than my Raleigh Detour iE though.

By the way, shout out to Bob there as he actually did a 28 mile loop with me on another Pedego while I rode his Ridge Rider and answered every conceivable specific and general question I could come up with. He didn't act like a fan-boy either, he just gave me the facts.