Thudbuster Failure Ouch!

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Fellow ES member suffered a cracked seat tube on a newer CaneCreek Thudbuster at speed (66 kph).. Don't know if he had to change his shorts after this..lol

It cracked at the highest stress point.. So if you have one may want to check for evidence of cracking.. There was a recall on the older Thudbusters and they changed the design (2002).
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Ouch! I guess that could happen to all the cantilevered suspension seat-posts. 3 brands I know of. Do I need to go back to a straight seat-post spring or nothing at all?
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
No J.R. CC has a very good reputation.. However if you weigh 250 lbs or more, I'd be very careful and inspect those types of post designs, because they have a service weight limit of 250 lbs.
 

Mike Smith

Active Member
Ouch is right. That had to be an "interesting" last five seconds of that ride. I will have to keep an eye on my seatpost and BF suspension as I am probably over the weight limit, but I don't ride that hard. Thanks for the info.
 

GatorBob

Member
If a rider is seriously injured or killed due to that failure, Thudbuster is looking at a multi-million dollar lawsuit.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Unusual seatpost design, you can see how all the motion could add more stress to the metal, but...

(66 kph).
...forget about a successful lawsuit at that speed. The rider only has himself to blame if some part fails.
 

wa5

Well-Known Member
I doubt whether 66kph would be mentioned in court :)

is the pole part of the kit, or is it the original bike seat post.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I think the answer is more like: make sure you are within the weight and usage guidelines for a product you purchase. example: If a product is built to handle 225 lbs and you weigh that or more then you're already stressing the component beyond it's rating. Ride it at super high speed on top of that and you're asking for trouble.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I think the answer is more like: make sure you are within the weight and usage guidelines for a product you purchase. example: If a product is built to handle 225 lbs and you weigh that or more then you're already stressing the component beyond it's rating. Ride it at super high speed on top of that and you're asking for trouble.
The leverage of that design makes the product look inherently prone to breakage.

The paradox is that it's designed to smooth out bumps, but the worse bumps you go over, the more stresses the mechanism absorbs.... the more likely it is to fail.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
If a rider is seriously injured or killed due to that failure, Thudbuster is looking at a multi-million dollar lawsuit.
That is pure speculation and fear mongering. We don't know if the user had the seatpost adjusted correctly. There are several entries on this forum concerning the Thudbuster and its adjustment is a bit tricky and can affect the performance. Also, this rider was going fairly fast, if that matters.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
The leverage of that design makes the product look inherently prone to breakage.

The paradox is that it's designed to smooth out bumps, but the worse bumps you go over, the more stresses the mechanism absorbs.... the more likely it is to fail.
Again this is speculation and fear mongering--see the message above to GatorBob.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Ann M. I respect your opinion a lot, but I feel the term "fear mongering" is a little strong. The design of this, or several sprung seatposts, takes a human rider's weight and exerts it as forceful, moving leverage against the post.

The photo speaks for itself. Yes, the speed was extreme, no doubt! The post should be over-engineered to not snap due to speed (or due to incorrect, "tricky" adjustments).
 

NoDTMF

Active Member
Oh hi,

I have a Thrusbuster and it is doing quite well. Thrudbusters do come with their own seat post. Mine is 30.9mm @JoePah , what size is your seat post?
 

GW Shark

Member
You must live within the engineered design regarding weight, usage, and any other limitations. Contributory negligence, contingent upon jurisdiction would not play well for the plaintiff in this case.

All facts weight in and a good plaintiffs attorney may be the last thing of concern in this case. Thank God he was not injured and until all facts are given, can you say here say your honor!
 

GatorBob

Member
That is pure speculation and fear mongering.
That's a ridiculous statement. Risk of a lawsuit especially in this instance is a FACT. Anyone can find a lawyer to sue anyone over anything, anytime. In this case the manufacturer is really exposed. As a newspaper reporter I covered hundreds of trials . Lawyers can and do twist and stretch truth until it becomes unrecognizable. When they have an actual basis for a lawsuit they outdo junkyard dogs in their tenacity.