Thudbuster vs Kinekt seat posts

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Anyone have experience riding both the Cane Creek Thudbuster and the Kinekt (formally Body Float)?
I’m looking for a suspension seat post for the 2nd ebike. Already have a Body Float on ebike number one and love the seat post. But I’m willing to check out other options. Haven’t found a Thudbuster on a bike to test ride at any lbs.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I have both on ebikes, and the Kinekt is far and away superior. It also requires less space to function. The TB needs about 4" of seat-post space between the saddle rails and seat-tube. The TB works well, but I don't think the elastomers work as well as the springs on the Kinekt.
 

John from Connecticut

Well-Known Member
Anyone have experience riding both the Cane Creek Thudbuster and the Kinekt (formally Body Float)?
I’m looking for a suspension seat post for the 2nd ebike. Already have a Body Float on ebike number one and love the seat post. But I’m willing to check out other options. Haven’t found a Thudbuster on a bike to test ride at any lbs.


I have no experience with the Thudbuster, have two Kinekt ( Body Floats) on my bikes and I love them.
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the feedback, Douglas & JR. I was leaning towards the Kinect mostly because I already have one on ebike #1. But the Thudbusters have such great reviews.
Ebike #2 has a unique challenge because the rear light is mounted on the saddle. The wire to the rear light runs through the seat post. Upon a suggestion from Ravi, Kinect can drill a small hole at the top of the seat post to run the wire and so I don’t need to lose the back light. It’s a nice wide bright light, very visible. Thanks Ravi. Anyway, I’m not so sure the same modification is possible on a Thudbuster.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I have the Kinekt, the Thudbuster ST and the Thudbuster LT. IMO, the Kinekt provides a slightly better ride than the Thudbuster ST. The Thudbuster LT however is the best of the three. It has 3" of travel but takes up about 4" of seatpost space. It also requires some adjustment by selecting the right elastomers. I have mine set to depress about an inch when seated which allows the remaining 2 inches for absorbing shock loads. The same principle can be used with the Kinekt but it's 1.5 inches of travel limits the adjustment range.

Seatposts, like saddles, offer different levels of comfort for each individual rider and personal preference varies a great deal. Unfortunately, trial and error is the only way to know what works for you.
 

Daneflyer

Member
Just installed the Kinekt on my Stromer ST1X today. Wow!! What a difference. This alone is going to make huge difference in my commute. Ordered the baramind handlebars today to take some of the shock out of the front End. Hopefully it will dampen enough that I don’t feel the need for a shock fork.
 

CSH

Active Member
Thudbuster ST...... Elastomer Question.

By the Thudbuster ST weight chart, I am at the boarder of a #5 Medium (140-190), and a #7 Hard (190-250) Elastomer.
I am 200lbs.

But the #5 Medium feels Firmer then I wish. (doesn't really "float").

I'd like to use the #3 Soft but their instruction sheet says "Never use a Softer Elastomer then recommended for your weight".
Has anyone tried a Softer then recommended Elastomer ?
Did the Thudbuster Police come after you ;) ?
Is it detrimental ?
Maybe I'm expecting the wrong results ?

I only ride neighborhood streets and bike paths.

Craig
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Thudbuster ST...... Elastomer Question.

By the Thudbuster ST weight chart, I am at the boarder of a #5 Medium (140-190), and a #7 Hard (190-250) Elastomer.
I am 200lbs.

But the #5 Medium feels Firmer then I wish. (doesn't really "float").

I'd like to use the #3 Soft but their instruction sheet says "Never use a Softer Elastomer then recommended for your weight".
Has anyone tried a Softer then recommended Elastomer ?
Did the Thudbuster Police come after you ;) ?
Is it detrimental ?
Maybe I'm expecting the wrong results ?

I only ride neighborhood streets and bike paths.

Craig

The chart says I should use a #7 but I have a #5 installed in my Thudbuster ST. I'm 250 and have used it for a couple of years with no problem. The danger in going too soft is the suspension could bottom out hard and cause damage to the mechanism. By going softer than recommended, you sacrifice some of the suspension travel since it compresses a bit when you sit on it. You could try a #5 and see how it performs but if you bottom it out frequently, switch up to the #7.
 
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Just installed the Kinekt on my Stromer ST1X today. Wow!! What a difference. This alone is going to make huge difference in my commute. Ordered the baramind handlebars today to take some of the shock out of the front End. Hopefully it will dampen enough that I don’t feel the need for a shock fork.
Baramid. 'BAM City'? Yes, on my mind, but scarce in USA. How did that work out?
These City Streets are killing me.
Really good to see some quality upgrades being done.
My shock fork works (I'm thoroughly familiar with it's limited adjustments) pretty much, but I still feel a lot through the handlebars - and the damping really brings out the 'thud' - right up my spine - when the rear comes down.
I've narrowed it down to the TB/ Kinekt for next upgrade and this is a perfect opportunity to hear the long term facts.
How do you like yours now, two years later ???

Thanks

Fn'F
 

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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Really good to see some quality upgrades being done.
My shock fork works (I'm thoroughly familiar with it's limited adjustments) pretty much, but I still feel a lot through the handlebars - and the damping really brings out the 'thud' - right up my spine - when the rear comes down.
Thanks

Fn'F
If you're getting handlebar vibration despite your suspension forks, here's another quality upgrade to consider:


I use the Redshift on top of my Rockshox 30 Gold suspension forks and it makes a big difference for me. I use the softest elastomer and it takes out almost all the vibration passed on by the forks.
 

Merle Nelson

Active Member
Region
USA
Daneflyers last post was August of 2019 if I understand correctly. (Click on his name/handle and click on Postings.)

And I think the best chance of summoning someone from an old thread is by typing @ and their name/handle - email sent notifying them even when not following a thread.

I've only been ebiking a couple of months and mostly on gravel roads, paths, fire roads. I have a Sondors MXS, my wife has a Pedego Ridge Rider - both hard tail mountain bikes. We both added the Kinekt seat posts and I added the Kinekt handlebar stem. We both like our set ups they reduced shock by a lot. (A true mountain biker could not abide the movement in the stem I'm sure.)
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
I’m looking at Kinekt as well for my non-eBike and eventually using it on my new eBike when I eventually get it.
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have both on different bikes. Both the Thud old-design ST and LT and the new-design LT. Also a Kinekt bought a few months ago. Both are excellent. the Kinekt is better and worth the extra money if you can see thru to spending it. I'm a street rider so we're talking potholes and railroad tracks and such.

If you choose the Thud, do not go halfsies and get an ST. I did and when I decided to give an LT a shot I was mad at myself for ever thinking the LT would be overkill. the new design is not as goofy looking which is kind of what held me back before.
 
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Daneflyers last post was August of 2019 if I understand correctly. (Click on his name/handle and click on Postings.)

And I think the best chance of summoning someone from an old thread is by typing @ and their name/handle - email sent notifying them even when not following a thread.

I've only been ebiking a couple of months and mostly on gravel roads, paths, fire roads. I have a Sondors MXS, my wife has a Pedego Ridge Rider - both hard tail mountain bikes. We both added the Kinekt seat posts and I added the Kinekt handlebar stem. We both like our set ups they reduced shock by a lot. (A true mountain biker could not abide the movement in the stem I'm sure.)
Thanks for the info. I was pretty set on it, but waiting at the current take-it-or-leave-it prices ($249.00 + $22.00 Tax). Today, finally found a Cirrus Cycles Kinekt 2.1 Suspension Seatpost - 27.2, 420 mm, Black, Large, in stock at $217.00, Free Shipping and NO Tax, so I bit the bullet. Best price I've seen.

http://www.bikeman.com/ST0585.html?utm_source=GoogleBase&utm_medium=GoogleBase&utm_campaign=GoogleBase&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6MWomb7M8AIVpYJbCh3MCgPFEAQYASABEgJ2UvD_BwE

Reading here and other sources also had me set on the Selle Anatomica X2 to complete the package. Serendipity strikes and again only today I found a code at Selle's site for $33.00 off the (pretty much fixed $165.00) regular price using code: SPRING20 https://selleanatomica.com/products/x2
Better than Amazon or Anyzon's I could find.
Been riding my e-bike for about 10 months, certainly no "true mountain biker". What you're riding will be the worst of what I'll see.
My next addition is an anti-theft seat-post lock and replacing the seat hardware with security fasteners. More research.
My philosophy is 10 - 15% of replacement cost I spend on security to protect it. That $45 - $67.00.
A big Thank YOU for this topic's input from owners (and to my Homeboys at Selle in San Diego CA -- America's finest city).
Sure helped me narrowing down the options to make my decision.
 
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Region
USA
City
San Diego
Well worth it. Had to wait a bit because R1U's seat-post specs are wrong and I obtained the wrong size shim.
Seat is awesome. The underside and edges I treated in beeswax. The Kinekt 2.1 came with medium and heavy springs, but I'm barely 140# (light), so need to order ordering those. Anybody have some light and need some heavy or medium springs?
A control knob will complete the package and when I install the springs, I'll spray the disassembled post/ springs with Teflon to make them non-stick easy to clean.

FnF
 

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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Well worth it. Had to wait a bit because R1U's seat-post specs are wrong and I obtained the wrong size shim.
Seat is awesome. The underside and edges I treated in beeswax. The Kinekt 2.1 came with medium and heavy springs, but I'm barely 140# (light), so need to order ordering those. Anybody have some light and need some heavy or medium springs?
A control knob will complete the package and when I install the springs, I'll spray the disassembled post/ springs with Teflon to make them non-stick easy to clean.

FnF
You might also consider the Kinekt cover wrap:
It keeps dirt & debris out and can extend the life of the bushings.
 
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Good advice. I agree it must be covered as well.
While I did consider the wrap, I'm leaning towards using some Waterproof 1/4" diving suit rubber and Velcro I have laying around. Velcro tight around the top and bottom and down the side; easy install/ remove; one piece; no drawstrings; rubber and fully elastic.
Cirrus' "Overview" says: "Our custom made Protective Wrap fits snuggly over your KINEKT Seat-post with a drawstring to protect from the elements". No reviews, so I checked Amazon: "This $15 cover should be included with the $250 Seatpost. It probably cost's less than a dollar to make." This: "Too light weight for the price." There were others saying the same thing. People say it keeps the dirt out, prevents squeaks, etc., but nobody say's it stops water, so I have doubts and my concern is has been my Torque Sensor PAS at the bottom my seat tube. Moisture coming down being funneled right to the seat-post tube's head.
I checked for leaks by blowing air into the bottom of the tube) and although they're small, it does leak at the top.
Unfortunately, Cirrus uses a 'beautifully grooved, with a large hole and stunning concave curves' seat-clamp (a work of art) that will let some water in regardless of ANY reasonable covers design, waterproof or not. You can't seal it.
The solution was simple: A tube of silicone with tubing attached worked to reach the depth of the (upside down) seat-tube needed. Fill the tubing with silicon and run to down inside post to the bottom (top, whatever). Squirt, squirt a couple dollops. Remove tube and flashlight shows the results. It took me two tries to get perfect. The silicone spreads out a lot and covers any leaks. I used maybe two tablespoons.
Now on to another leak: the shim/ tube/ seat-post interfaces.
When I install the springs, I'm doing this: https://www.bikeradar.com/features/budget-bike-tech-seal-your-frame-from-mud-and-water/
Thank you Bike Radar !!! A very down to Earth site and that advice is priceless info for all e-bike owners.
Next up is this https://selleanatomica.com/blogs/homepage-blog/x2-carbon-rail-upgrade-kit
It'll be fun taking the KINEKT apart and putting together. Nice YouTube vid I saw last night on changing the springs and another on set-up.
I do ride to work and when it - contrary to the weatherman's assurance - pours and it's best to be sealed up tight.

Thank you and Happy trails !!!

Fn'F
 

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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Good advice. I agree it must be covered as well.
While I did consider the wrap, I'm leaning towards using some Waterproof 1/4" diving suit rubber and Velcro I have laying around. Velcro tight around the top and bottom and down the side; easy install/ remove; one piece; no drawstrings; rubber and fully elastic.
Cirrus' "Overview" says: "Our custom made Protective Wrap fits snuggly over your KINEKT Seat-post with a drawstring to protect from the elements". No reviews, so I checked Amazon: "This $15 cover should be included with the $250 Seatpost. It probably cost's less than a dollar to make." This: "Too light weight for the price." There were others saying the same thing. People say it keeps the dirt out, prevents squeaks, etc., but nobody say's it stops water, so I have doubts and my concern is has been my Torque Sensor PAS at the bottom my seat tube. Moisture coming down being funneled right to the seat-post tube's head.
I checked for leaks by blowing air into the bottom of the tube) and although they're small, it does leak at the top.
Unfortunately, Cirrus uses a 'beautifully grooved, with a large hole and stunning concave curves' seat-clamp (a work of art) that will let some water in regardless of ANY reasonable covers design, waterproof or not. You can't seal it.
The solution was simple: A tube of silicone with tubing attached worked to reach the depth of the (upside down) seat-tube needed. Fill the tubing with silicon and run to down inside post to the bottom (top, whatever). Squirt, squirt a couple dollops. Remove tube and flashlight shows the results. It took me two tries to get perfect. The silicone spreads out a lot and covers any leaks. I used maybe two tablespoons.
Now on to another leak: the shim/ tube/ seat-post interfaces.
When I install the springs, I'm doing this: https://www.bikeradar.com/features/budget-bike-tech-seal-your-frame-from-mud-and-water/
Thank you Bike Radar !!! A very down to Earth site and that advice is priceless info for all e-bike owners.
Next up is this https://selleanatomica.com/blogs/homepage-blog/x2-carbon-rail-upgrade-kit
It'll be fun taking the KINEKT apart and putting together. Nice YouTube vid I saw last night on changing the springs and another on set-up.
I do ride to work and when it - contrary to the weatherman's assurance - pours and it's best to be sealed up tight.

Thank you and Happy trails !!!

Fn'F
The Kinekt cover wrap is indeed spendy for what you get but it's more durable than it looks. It isn't waterproof but it is treated with something that makes water bead up rather than sink in. Since I rarely ride in rain heavy enough to penetrate the cover, it really isn't a problem. When transporting the bike, I always remove the seat post to avoid water getting into the seat tube. It's also a good idea to prevent theft. I cover the open seat tube with a simple, tight fitting vinyl cap that keeps out dust, debris and moisture:

P1070169a.jpg
P1070173a.jpg
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Well worth it. Had to wait a bit because R1U's seat-post specs are wrong and I obtained the wrong size shim.
Seat is awesome. The underside and edges I treated in beeswax. The Kinekt 2.1 came with medium and heavy springs, but I'm barely 140# (light), so need to order ordering those. Anybody have some light and need some heavy or medium springs?
A control knob will complete the package and when I install the springs, I'll spray the disassembled post/ springs with Teflon to make them non-stick easy to clean.

FnF
I put a Kinekt and Baramind City on my Trek Allant 9.9S right after I bought it in early 2020. It took a stiff, hard riding bike and, along with a pair of Schwalbe Hurricanes inflated to 35psi, made it completely comfortable for my 70 year old bones. I also made some substantial mods to the drive train to get top performance out of it. I have almost 3,000 miles on the bike, ride it hard and fast and find it very comfortable to ride with the mods.

I weigh 210 lbs and use the orange springs. It is important to set the spring preload screw such that there is no sag when you sit carefully on the saddle. This limits the travel but takes the weird bounce out of it when pedaling hard and give you compliance when you need it. Also the SQ labs 702 grips help with cushioning impact and vibration to the hands and wrists.