TO ALL BIKE MANUFACTURERS

To All Bike Manufacturers:
You have been making bikes for years. Now, you have thousands of 60+ bikers who haven’t ridden for over 25 years.
We have different needs and concerns.
WE COME IN ALL SIZES. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL!

I CAN’T be the only short female who cannot find the right bike!!!
My bike does not exist. TALLER bikers can handle the bikes that are available now. Short riders are very limited.
TIME TO START MAKING BIKES FOR THIS GENERATION OF BIKERS!!!

HERE IS WHAT I WANT:

LOW Step Through
Mid drive motor
750 W. 48V
14ah or more
On Demand Throttle - a must!

SMALL size for shorter riders
Upright position
Handlebars that are not as wide as cruiser, upright, adjustable
Suspension fork
Suspension seat post
Hydraulic disc brakes
Cushy wide seat
Integrated battery
2.4 or wider tires, puncture proof, 26”
7-10 gears
Head lights with turning signals
Weight- 40-55 lbs with rack. (Rack does not have to be heavy duty!)

ADDED BONUS
Customizable colors like Electric Bike Company does it.
Integrated locking device (Como code) so bike cannot be ridden without it. Or maybe integrated GPS.
Something like a KILL SWITCH I had once on my classic convertible might be good.

Most of these features are pretty necessary for older, more fragile riders.
A bike that is lighter in weight is easier to control. Less likely to fall
Ability to get your feet on the ground can prevent a fall.
TOD is important for many seniors in many situations. We are a bit less agile.
Mid drive motor allows you to remove both wheels if you need to bring it in for repair. Or place in car, Uber, Taxi etc
Where is my bike????

CLOSEST I have found is FLX from San Diego. Tires seem to be too thin, but has everything else, except the bonus stuff!
 

MartsEbike

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
Tall riders don't find perfect bikes either... we buy something close, and then add the parts we want.... Given you have a long list of wishes, you should do the same.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
I wonder if an automotive powder coat paint shop near you would spray your bike frame, you might pay a bike shop to disassemble the bike until you have a bare frame and fork, and reassemble it afterwards, then you would have your choice of colors.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
"Most of these features are pretty necessary for older, more fragile riders." I'm 68 and still ride single track on a class 3 full suspension Haibike, and ride a class 3 Haibike road bike. I've averaged 3,000 miles a year since mid 2016. I don't feel like I qualify for your fragile older rider requirements and hope all manufacturers don't use your broad strokes of all seniors based on your experience. If you go to some higher end manufactures, they offer as many as 4 frame sizes. Here are reviews of kids eBikes if you really need a small frame. https://electricbikereview.com/category/kids/
 
Hi! lol, I’m certainly not old or decrepit either. Lol. But I have fallen, and want to avoid that as much as possible!!! What I meant was that IF we fall, it’s a little more likely we will get hurt. And many seniors are taking up riding now, who aren’t in good shape and haven’t ridden for over 25 years.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Indeed. What some people consider necessary (big battery, big motor with throttle, full suspension) I consider useless extra weight. And what I consider necessary (a bike that fits) isn't even considered in the one size fits all bikes. And I am close to 70 years old as well.
 
Yes. I agree mostly. But I do want that throttle. Now that I have it on my Pace 500 I have found it very useful!! When I am without any assist, and need a quick boost up an incline, it works great. When I had pain in my knee a few months back, it got me going for half a mile while I rested my knee. So I don’t want to give that up. But I never go over 20MPH and usually don’t ride longer than 2-3 hours. And almost always on 0-3Assist.
I don’t need full suspension either although front shock would be nice but not a deal breaker.
 

Luto

Active Member
All the other features are possible, but that is a pretty long list with the throttle REQUIREMENT. It is all a compromise.

That being said, all the equipment and feature cannot make up for basic bicycling skills. Although the adage about "never forgetting how to ride" is often stated, it is not really true. Handling and skills need to me learned and maintained. Older people can judge based on their experiences in the past, and use outdated reasoning. But a quick look at YouTube will show how much bicycling has changed. There are a lot of "skills" videos one can practice. It would serve someone over 50 to relearn basic handling skills if they are going to use an E-bike and go way faster than they can go on a regular bike.

And here is the point: Once you can ride with medium proficiently, a lot of those features, are not needed anymore and are replaced with your skill as a bike rider. No amount of skill will lengthen you legs ;), but it can make them less of an issue. For instance many bikes now have a relaxed geometry that allows anyone to balance at a standstill with some practice. You should be able to balance for at least 1-2 seconds at a stand still, otherwise you WILL be falling a lot, or scraping your shin on the pedal.

Balance skill and equipment. Don't go all equipment and no skill.

Usually about once a month someone posts about their crash on an e-bike. Almost never do they say they actually practiced bike handling such as fast stops, slick road avoidance, or changes from pavement to gravel.

I wonder if anyone would recommend that FLX 2.0 pre order bike. Probably 55 pounds, as you describe it, and that Suntour Spring fork is considered a "dog" and less safe than no suspension. Probably good for 30 miles or less in medium assist sitting upright.

For over 3K I would look at this bike: https://moustachebikes.com/en/electric-bikes/friday-28/friday-28-3-open/ There is a shop near Santa Barbra CA IMO better bang for the buck and rides like a real bike and 42mm tires are pretty darn stable running at 40psi. I run mine at 35psi. BUT no throttle! That darn throttle really narrows down the choices.:(
 
Wow. Thanks. Lots of info. I have 1200 miles on my Pace. But that’s the only ebike I have ever ridden.
maybe I need to test a few others. But the falling part is mainly due to being on a larger bike than the one I have. Most of the good ones, like Dost are too big for me. I tested the Gazelle and it didn’t seem to have any power, and has no throttle.
I will look at your recommendation. Thanks much
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I'm another throttle fan. When a dog is trying to bite my ankle, I don't want to be trying to find the higher pas control on a display invisible in the sunlight. I twist the throttle and speed away. Plus, I hated PAS with a minimum speed of 11 mph and a minimum acceleration of 300 W. I deleted the pas pickup, I use throttle on days when the wind is >12 mph in my face. I'd like torque sensing control, but controllers for aftermarket kits don't come that way.
I agree the market hates short people. I found a bike for short legs (left) that won't pitch me on my chin as 2 MTB and a cruiser have done. So, this year, yuba discontinued it and replaced it with a model suitable for 64" people minimum. I'm not short 68", but my legs are 28" inseam. all my height is in my back.
The 2.4" tires you want is a real market limiter. I use 2.1" and the forks won't take any bigger. Perhaps you should buy a non-powered bike and convert as I did. This bodaboda bike in 2017 came with a bosch active line mid drive which I suspected would drag like an anchor power off. Plus mid drives eat chains. So I bought the unpowered bike, then added a 1300 W geared hub motor to it on the front. The battery is in an aluminum angle cage wrapped in foam & plastic, screwed to the fixed mount holes on the front (which only stretch cargo bikes have). You can't buy a bike with a front drive, some idiot might try to power through a wet rock or steel patch and fall down. Then they would sue the manufacturer.
Be aware that you can buy aftermarket lights & suspension front forks. Just make sure the front pivot is a standard size. (my bodaboda is NOT.)
I see three normal sized people have tried to recommend you ride a jawbreaker 20" wheel bike. Short people can get sore. We can bite our tongues too. If one lived in London UK or west Germany, then the perfect pavement would make 20" wheels possible. 2" diameter skateboards possible, too. We have potholes here that last for decades, and in the rain or following a car through a traffic control, I can't always see them and miss them. Pavement separators that are 2" high, too. Fat tire 20" bikes may be bearable, I haven't tried one and am not going to bother to invest in $50 tires. 26"x2.1" kenda smoke knobbies are $26. BTW if I keep the knobs taller than 3/32" I don't pick up road trash & get flats. People that ride off road in goat thorn country (the west USA) may have different results.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
It is so important that the bike, the terrain, and the rider match up well. It all has to work right or people just don't ride it long.
 

NightRider1

Member
Region
Europe
I'm another throttle fan. When a dog is trying to bite my ankle, I don't want to be trying to find the higher pas control on a display invisible in the sunlight. I twist the throttle and speed away.
An interesting point of view, with me it's exactly the other way around, I can't wait to kick one of these bastards with full force into his damn mouth. 😏
 

Gordon71

Well-Known Member
I'm another throttle fan. When a dog is trying to bite my ankle, I don't want to be trying to find the higher pas control on a display invisible in the sunlight. I twist the throttle and speed away. Plus, I hated PAS with a minimum speed of 11 mph and a minimum acceleration of 300 W. I deleted the pas pickup, I use throttle on days when the wind is >12 mph in my face. I'd like torque sensing control, but controllers for aftermarket kits don't come that way.
I agree the market hates short people. I found a bike for short legs (left) that won't pitch me on my chin as 2 MTB and a cruiser have done. So, this year, yuba discontinued it and replaced it with a model suitable for 64" people minimum. I'm not short 68", but my legs are 28" inseam. all my height is in my back.
The 2.4" tires you want is a real market limiter. I use 2.1" and the forks won't take any bigger. Perhaps you should buy a non-powered bike and convert as I did. This bodaboda bike in 2017 came with a bosch active line mid drive which I suspected would drag like an anchor power off. Plus mid drives eat chains. So I bought the unpowered bike, then added a 1300 W geared hub motor to it on the front. The battery is in an aluminum angle cage wrapped in foam & plastic, screwed to the fixed mount holes on the front (which only stretch cargo bikes have). You can't buy a bike with a front drive, some idiot might try to power through a wet rock or steel patch and fall down. Then they would sue the manufacturer.
Be aware that you can buy aftermarket lights & suspension front forks. Just make sure the front pivot is a standard size. (my bodaboda is NOT.)
I see three normal sized people have tried to recommend you ride a jawbreaker 20" wheel bike. Short people can get sore. We can bite our tongues too. If one lived in London UK or west Germany, then the perfect pavement would make 20" wheels possible. 2" diameter skateboards possible, too. We have potholes here that last for decades, and in the rain or following a car through a traffic control, I can't always see them and miss them. Pavement separators that are 2" high, too. Fat tire 20" bikes may be bearable, I haven't tried one and am not going to bother to invest in $50 tires. 26"x2.1" kenda smoke knobbies are $26. BTW if I keep the knobs taller than 3/32" I don't pick up road trash & get flats. People that ride off road in goat thorn country (the west USA) may have different results.
I've never ridden a 20" but have a 26" fat tire (4" 20PSI) with front suspension,thudbuster ST and a comfortable saddle. How much a difference would a 20" wheel variation be on my jaw?