Tony Ellsworth launches new belt drive carbon frame e-bike

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
A beautifully designed Carbon frame with a Shimano mid-drive, NuVinci/Enviolo geared hub, Gates Belt-drive, and 630 Wh battery... pretty much checks all of the boxes! ;)


The Radiant Carbon features a unique carbon fiber frame design with a single support fork and a single asymmetric chain stay and seat stay at the rear. But you won’t find an old-fashioned chain cranking past that chain stay. Instead, the Radiant Carbon uses a Gates Carbon Drive belt system rated for an incredible 50,000 miles (80,000 km) of use. The belt-drive links a 500 W and 60 Nm Shimano mid-drive motor to a NuVinci optimized Enviolo continuously variable transmission in the rear hub. The use of an internally geared hub means no hanging derailleur and no noise, which also compliments the silent belt-drive. As a Class 1 e-bike system, that Shimano drive will power the bike up to 20 mph (32 km/h) on pedal assist, but does not have a throttle.

Powering the motor is a 630 Wh battery that is entirely hidden in the frame and achieves a claimed 100 miles (160 km) of range. I tested a similar Shimano setup and found that with moderate pedal assist, such ranges were achievable, though required self-discipline to not rely too heavily on the pedal assist. Other high-end components include four-piston Magura hydraulic disc brakes, front and rear LED lighting integrated directly into the bike’s frame, Schwalbe Super Moto 27.5 tires, and Bluetooth connectivity. Only 360 of the bikes will be produced, which of course doesn’t do the price tag any favors. To get your own Radiant Carbon, you’ll need to fork over $4,995. While that fits with other carbon fiber e-bike prices we’ve seen recently, it still doesn’t take the sting out of it.


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Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Thanks for sharing.
This comment from Tony stood out in the article:

But Tony wasn’t trying to build an affordable bike, he was trying to build a top-of-the-line bike, as he explained:

“Any time you get in a space where there’s a lot of product flooding that space because of the popularity of it, you get a lowest cost offering to get more people to adopt it. Which is great, because more people adopting e-bikes is wonderful in a million different ways and we could have a wonderful dinner conversation about it. The problem is that in that space, it becomes a little bit of a race to the bottom, of ‘How cheap can we make it?’ And while I agree that it’s nice to be able to have people get in at a lower cost, there’s no substitute for quality in any space where there are products, when you look around at automobiles, at cameras, at cell phones, there’s always a premium product in the space. And the Radiant Carbon from The Ride Bikes, my new e-bike brand, is the top of that space.”
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Thanks for sharing.
This comment from Tony stood out in the article:
But Tony wasn’t trying to build an affordable bike, he was trying to build a top-of-the-line bike, as he explained:
I agree... there will always be a place for high quality, well-engineered products.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
It is a very good looking bike, but what about suspension?

For a Class 1 bike, big volume tires are more effective than cheap suspension. High-end suspension would need complete geometry change and increases the cost substantially.
Also, unless one is riding these bikes in highly technical MTB terrain, they would not notice the benefits of suspension.

Tonly Ellsworth has built some iconic MTB's and he knows a thing or two about suspensions.


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Taylor57

Well-Known Member
For a Class 1 bike, big volume tires are more effective than cheap suspension. High-end suspension would need complete geometry change and increases the cost substantially.
Also, unless one is riding these bikes in highly technical MTB terrain, they would not notice the benefits of suspension.

Tonly Ellsworth has built some iconic MTB's and he knows a thing or two about suspensions.


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Wonder why he didnt add a throttle?
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Wonder why he didnt add a throttle?
There may be several reasons. Shimano doesn't want to offer throttle?
May be he doesn't want to add that feature to a Class-1 bike and make it Class-2?

Perhaps you can email them and ask them?

I am sure he has thought through many things. He has been a bicycle designer for a few decades now.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
The only thing I don't like about this ebike is the NuVini transmission.

I wonder if you have ridden an E-bike with Enviolo/Nuvinci transmission?
It's pretty decent actually for recreational and rolling hills terrain. For something that costs 1/4th of Rohloff, it offers very low maintenance. Sure, there is some efficiency loss but on an E-bike, it is not much of a problem.

There is a guy who has toured around the world on his R-M bike which has the Enviolo drive and has put in almost 50,000 kms.
He still has the original Nuvinci drive and that I think is quite remarkable. He had to replace the Bosch motor once but not the hub!

 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I've only ridden an ebike with a Enviolo/Nuvinci once. It was okay, but I'd rather pay the initial extra outlay of cash and go for the Rohloff, or go with a good quality derailleur setup.