Too strong bike lights

Marceltt

Active Member
Hi guys I have encountered a few bikes on the road that blind my vision at night while driving my car . Are there such lights from bikes that are that strong ? Also does anybody remember the bike lights that ran from a small generator that use to rub on the side of tire when engaged ? I wonder if they still sell those.
 

dm nelson

Active Member
Hi guys I have encountered a few bikes on the road that blind my vision at night while driving my car . Are there such lights from bikes that are that strong ? Also does anybody remember the bike lights that ran from a small generator that use to rub on the side of tire when engaged ? I wonder if they still sell those.
I've got a couple inexpensive led headlights that claim to be 400 lumens brightness. Plenty bright for $22 rechargeable lights. A good reminder for cyclists to kindly adjust lights down towards the road and away from on-coming drivers. I remember having one of those rub against the tire generators back on my 1970 Schwinn Stingray. That light never blinded anybody. :)
 
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JohnT

Active Member
I don't know how common friction generators are, but I know some cyclists like hub generators. I don't know how much power they put out, but I would guess not enough to drive a "too strong" light.

The brightest bicycle lights are too bright for street use. MTBers use them on night rides. They generally have external battery packs and run kinda hot. I don't know much about them, but 1500 real lumens rings a bell.

Lights with internal batteries seem to top out at over 800 lumens. That's really bright. I should try one some time, but I'm pretty happy with 500 lumens.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I wish they made bike lights like car headlights with the ability to have a wider beam with a light cutoff above a certain height so it will not blind bikers approaching. I end up pushing my light straight down so I don't blind other riders at night (the light has a rubber strap to secure on the handlebar). The new LED/CREE lights are so intense to on-coming rider and can effect their night vision compared to the road illumination they produce sometimes. I also have a helmet mounted light to turn my head away as I pass other riders on bike paths.

One good thing about the extra bright LED lights is a vehicle can see you better as they approach at night from the rear if you have to share the road like I do at 5:30am.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Yes, those $12-16 two LED "Crees" on ebay are extremely bright. I have seen a few diehards blind me with their lights. I believe in road etiquette and always point mine down in use. They still attract clouds of bugs in the summer on forest parkways. In your eyes, nose, and choke choke.

On the other hand, I can ride the bike paths on moon lit nights with only a little flasher LED in front. No clouds of bugs, and I'll see fireflies winking back at me on the side of the bike path that I won't see with other Cree lights. Kind of magical if you don't crash in the dark.
 
I wish they made bike lights like car headlights with the ability to have a wider beam with a light cutoff above a certain height so it will not blind bikers approaching. I end up pushing my light straight down so I don't blind other riders at night (the light has a rubber strap to secure on the handlebar). The new LED/CREE lights are so intense to on-coming rider and can effect their night vision compared to the road illumination they produce sometimes. I also have a helmet mounted light to turn my head away as I pass other riders on bike paths.

One good thing about the extra bright LED lights is a vehicle can see you better as they approach at night from the rear if you have to share the road like I do at 5:30am.
Lights that conform to the German StVZO standard have a cutoff. Most dynamo headlights are StVZO-compliant, but some battery-powered models exist. Kryptonite's new line of headlights are rebadged AXA models, and have the cutoff beam profile