Torque Wrench Recommendation

jcanavera

Member
Looks like I probably need to add a torque wrench that will register in newton meters. I do have one that works in foot inches but obviously you can't get an exact torque setting in nm due to the conversion process. I'd like to find one without having my pocket picked, but I guess like anything else you get what you pay for and maybe I'm a little too paranoid about buying something that's not accurate or the difference in trying to use my foot inch torque wrench. For one thing I'm not 100 % certain what its tolerances are.
 

monroe350

New Member
I think you mean newton meters not nanometers. Depends what torque range you need I would guess you will be tightening small bolts. I would get a clicker style torque wrench. Digital is probably overkill unless you know you need super accuracy. I probably would buy one that has good ratings on Amazon. Most of the torque wrenches sold in stores will probably be in in/foot pounds except maybe a bike shop but they tend to really mark them up in price.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Buy a modest torque wrench with good reviews. Then using your good wrench, torque a fastener you can convert the measurement, and check your new modest wrench against the torque set by the good wrench. If good keep it.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I'd buy a Fowler wrench, from an industrial tool supply to avoid the counterfeits on amazon & ebay.
If you can't find one of those distributors (we have two ford plants here), use https://www.mcmaster.com/torque-wrenches
Buy the one that displays NM.
Mcmaster won't tell you who they are selling, but they don't sell any garbage.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I carry a topeak portable tool set on my rides. It includes a torque tool that goes up to 6nm as well as a chain tool and a smart variety of hex and torx bits.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Topeak-Rat...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649
s-l1600.jpg
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I do have one that works in foot inches but obviously you can't get an exact torque setting in nm due to the conversion process.

That's just not a real concern. The numerical conversion is far more accurate than any torque wrench you can buy for under $400. Plus, many specs are given in ranges.

Because of its convenience and Park Tools great reputation, I'd recommend the Park ATD-1.2
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Under $70 and widely available.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Buy a torque wrench that can be calibrated. My kit wrenches soon go out of tolerance. No need to carry any on rides. Unless money is burning a hole in your pocket. My first 50 years of riding and wrenching never included a torque wrench. Jeebus, why make this do complex. <ducking> MAC tools and other mechanic direct sales trucks are a good bet. AND they recalibrate.

My Park tools, as posted above,
have been the most consistent.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
Buy a torque wrench that can be calibrated. My kit wrenches soon go out of tolerance. No need to carry any on rides. Unless money is burning a hole in your pocket. My first 50 years of riding and wrenching never included a torque wrench. Jeebus, why make this do complex. <ducking> MAC tools and other mechanic direct sales trucks are a good bet. AND they recalibrate.

You know as well as I do that for a long time we didn't have aluminum and carbon fiber parts screwing things up. These days with modern lightweight parts and lots of steel bolts and brackets going into aluminum frames it is shockingly easy to strip threads. Sometimes it seems threads will strip on some parts if you say unkind words about them.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
You know as well as I do that for a long time we didn't have aluminum and carbon fiber parts screwing things up. These days with modern lightweight parts and lots of steel bolts and brackets going into aluminum frames it is shockingly easy to strip threads. Sometimes it seems threads will strip on some parts if you say unkind words about them.
Perhaps years of wrenching has helped me. I haven’t stripped a bolt in decades. However, I do have some taps and do cleanup aluminium frame parts with a tap first. This practise has served me well. Carbon fibre? I’ll never bother with that investment. But your point is certainly valid. I just question how important it is for the average rider to spend $100, plus, for a proper torque wrench. Sometimes I think we get a bit overboard and make this more complex, and expensive than necessary. How many of us buy a torque wrench for our cages? These days, lots of aluminium.
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
My view is that a $70 wrench is paid for the first time you do your own repair. Heck, just the time I save not having to take it to the shop and wait and then come back to pick it up is worth $70. Not to mention the labor charges.
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Here's a review of bicycle torque wrenches: https://www.bikeradar.com/features/the-best-cycling-torque-wrenches/

Note it reviewed an older model of the Parks I linked above - the new one doesn't need a tool to adjust. Also, the X-Tools wrench (under different branding) is listed. The descriptions include their measured accuracy.

The X-Tools wrench at 5 was actually 5.8Nm. The Park at 5 was 5.13Nm. Of course, maybe you need more than the limited range of the Park.
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
I carry a topeak portable tool set on my rides. It includes a torque tool that goes up to 6nm as well as a chain tool and a smart variety of hex and torx bits.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Topeak-Ratchet-Rocket-Lite-NTX-Portable-Mini-Torque-Wrench-Bicycle-Multi-Tool/254187303532?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

Thanks for the link, I just grabbed one but although it's named the same it looks different..........probably because I got it off Amazon.
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