Torque Wrench

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Deleted member 803

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On my way to REI to purchase the Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza II Deluxe Torque Wrench Kit


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Hope I like it............
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Bought mine at Harbor freight for 10 dollars.. Works great.. Buy the 3/8 and 1/4 inch drives for $20
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Harbor Freight is always offering a deal on torque wrenches to get you in their stores. I had all three 1/4 thru 1/2" and the torque settings calibrated favorably to my Craftsman wrenches. OK for one time use or for tossing in the toolbox in the trunk. They fall apart with heavy use by auto enthusiasts. For light work on a bike, the HF 1/4" would be fine, except for its size, and it's really designed for heavier fasteners.

That Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza II sure is a good looking set. though, and I love the graduated scale. Enjoy it!
 
D

Deleted member 803

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Harbor Freight is always offering a deal on torque wrenches to get you in their stores. I had all three 1/4 thru 1/2" and the torque settings calibrated favorably to my Craftsman wrenches. OK for one time use or for tossing in the toolbox in the trunk. They fall apart with heavy use by auto enthusiasts. For light work on a bike, the HF 1/4" would be fine, except for its size, and it's really designed for heavier fasteners.

That Effetto Mariposa Giustaforza II sure is a good looking set. though, and I love the graduated scale. Enjoy it!
I made the mistake of being talked into a snap-on torque wrench for motorcycle work. It has an angle adjustable head, digital readout, vibration notice, audible notice, and is built like a Patek Watch. Got me spoiled very quickly. I only have 34 more monthly payments until it is truly mine (laugh). I bought the white handled with orange cap 2-7nm torque wrench from my local bike shop and the wrench and bits are mediocre and strip easily. I've been guilty of stripping many bolts over the past few years so I am sensitive to torque settings. There are quite a few on the Stromer and even more of them on my prvevious Neo Carbon. Will let you know how i like them.
 

fxr3

Active Member
A st2 and 1/4" snap on (motorcycle leftover) are a natural fit. Kinda late in the game to shop harbor freight with st2 in garage. You know why it's called harbor freight? Everything in store come thru a harbor before it hits the shelfs
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
A st2 and 1/4" snap on (motorcycle leftover) are a natural fit. Kinda late in the game to shop harbor freight with st2 in garage. You know why it's called harbor freight? Everything in store come thru a harbor before it hits the shelfs
I heard it was because everything is made out of scrap metal they dredge out of harbors.
They do have a lot of servicable cheap stuff though. Great place for bungies and other odd ball stuff.
with motorcycles and their frequent aluminum fasteners we use 2 fingers on the wrench, no more. 1 finger for very light torque settings.
I've read several tests that showed almost all of the cheap torque wrenches being basically not worth a ****. The lighter the torque range, the less accurate they were.
I had a HF and a Craftsman (small sized) and both stripped fasteners before showing the set torque spec. Both are in the landfill now.
 
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fxr3

Active Member
I've spent plenty in harbor freight, and I believe they started locally in my county.
And I bad-mouth snap on for their prices. But, that 1/4 drive electronic torque is worth every penny, if your into torquing proper specs.....
 

Operator7

Active Member
I made the mistake of being talked into a snap-on torque wrench for motorcycle work. It has an angle adjustable head, digital readout, vibration notice, audible notice, and is built like a Patek Watch. Got me spoiled very quickly. I only have 34 more monthly payments until it is truly mine (laugh). I bought the white handled with orange cap 2-7nm torque wrench from my local bike shop and the wrench and bits are mediocre and strip easily. I've been guilty of stripping many bolts over the past few years so I am sensitive to torque settings. There are quite a few on the Stromer and even more of them on my prvevious Neo Carbon. Will let you know how i like them.
What are torque settings? :)
 

Operator7

Active Member
YES!!! Always torque your fasteners or get someone who can.
So like, for how tight I screw on the water bottle holder, I need to get some sort of device to measure the "torque" of the "fastener" (I'm guessing the fastener means screw)?
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
So like, for how tight I screw on the water bottle holder, I need to get some sort of device to measure the "torque" of the "fastener" (I'm guessing the fastener means screw)?
Water bottle, bell, lights aren't structural. Racks, handlebar, seat post, wheel skewer, drive components, etc. are structural and for safety reasons should be tightened to mfg. specification. Not trying to alarm you and many owners don't use a torque wrench, but a wrench is cheap insurance. Many parts come with specs printed on them, for reason.

You don't need an expensive torque wrench, just an accurate one and you should be able to find one for $50 +/-.
 

Operator7

Active Member
Water bottle, bell, lights aren't structural. Racks, handlebar, seat post, wheel skewer, drive components, etc. are structural and for safety reasons should be tightened to mfg. specification. Not trying to alarm you and many owners don't use a torque wrench, but a wrench is cheap insurance. Many parts come with specs printed on them, for reason.

You don't need an expensive torque wrench, just an accurate one and you should be able to find one for $50 +/-.
I see said the blind man!

Guess I have a new chapter of research to do... I don't even know what a torque wrench is, let alone how to use one. I did tighten my handlebar and plan to mount a rack when it arrives. Don't know what "wheel skewer" or "drive components" are, but I'm guessing the wheel skewer might be the thing that holds the wheel to the frame. I was looking at that on the ST1, because it is not a quick release, and I am considering what I will need in order to remove it, in the event of a flat. I had heard that at least the front wheel of the ST1 was quick release, but it does not appear so.

I heard they have classes at REI. Maybe this is where I can go to learn more about all this... I wish there was a video specifically for the Stromer, and how to change a flat tire!!

Thanks for your teaching! (even though I don't enjoy this ish :p )
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I see said the blind man!

Guess I have a new chapter of research to do... I don't even know what a torque wrench is, let alone how to use one. I did tighten my handlebar and plan to mount a rack when it arrives. Don't know what "wheel skewer" or "drive components" are, but I'm guessing the wheel skewer might be the thing that holds the wheel to the frame. I was looking at that on the ST1, because it is not a quick release, and I am considering what I will need in order to remove it, in the event of a flat. I had heard that at least the front wheel of the ST1 was quick release, but it does not appear so.

I heard they have classes at REI. Maybe this is where I can go to learn more about all this... I wish there was a video specifically for the Stromer, and how to change a flat tire!!

Thanks for your teaching! (even though I don't enjoy this ish :p )
My bike torque wrench is very similar to this:

 
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NoDTMF

Active Member
I guess we can go way overboard talking about torque wrenches. Generally the Beam torque wrenches are very accurate and hold there accuracy over time. Usually they cost the least. No matter what, the bolt should be moving when reading the beam or listening/feeling the click.

Fastner theory 101: the bolt and nut form a clamp for the two pieces being held together- the friction between the two pieces is what holds the parts in position. In most cases, the fastener should be not be exposed to shear stresses. For example, next time you see a trailer hitch held in using a bolt as a hitch pin, wince and pray your not driving behind him.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I guess we can go way overboard talking about torque wrenches. Generally the Beam torque wrenches are very accurate and hold there accuracy over time. Usually they cost the least. No matter what, the bolt should be moving when reading the beam or listening/feeling the click.

Fastner theory 101: the bolt and nut form a clamp for the two pieces being held together- the friction between the two pieces is what holds the parts in position. In most cases, the fastener should be not be exposed to shear stresses. For example, next time you see a trailer hitch held in using a bolt as a hitch pin, wince and pray your not driving behind him.
I still have my old beam t-wrenches and it's true they don't lose accuracy, but they're inconvenient to use at many angles and not accurate to fine delineations or very small fasteners. They are great for checking click torque wrenches.
 

fxr3

Active Member
Torque specs aren't that important- well, until you strip a hole and there is no room to oversize or helicoil-or your handlebars fall off at 28mph.
But most people that have worked on stuff for all their lives, get it pretty close naturally. I still like my snap- on, and now at 10 years old, its less than a dollar a week, and would sell for 80%+of new, a text book get what you pay for.