Toughest puncture-proof 2.0 tires or a tiny bit bigger

OldGalOnBike

New Member
I am looking for a puncture-proof (or at least puncture resistant) tire for my new ebike (26").
I can't change out a tire and have no intention of learning, so need something strong.
Perhaps an upgrade to the tube?
And I've heard something about sliming the tires. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
Well, there really isn't any such thing as a puncture-proof tire. I'm sure the above-mentioned Marathons are good tires, but at best they may just lower your odds of having a flat. You might go years without one, but if you ride long enough, you will have a flat eventually. I hope this isn't you, but two or more flats in one outing is not unheard of. (Rare, but some people just have all the luck.)

Slime is wonderful. There is also Stans, and other brands. If you get a flat, most of the time you don't even know it. It's sealed and fixed before you even lose any air. You don't have to do anything. I use it and haven't had a flat since. I had one, on relatively new tires before the Slime. Even with a bad puncture with Slime, there's a chance you can add air to your tire and limp home. (Carry a pump or some CO2 and an inflator.)

Changing tube or patching a flat isn't hard, and is in my old-school opinion, just part of riding a bike, but if that's out of the question for you, carry your cell phone and don't cycle into a dead zone! Someone else on the forum just mentioned that they carry a Garmin InReach, which is a variant on a sat phone that lets you text for help from anywhere, regardless of cell coverage. Depending on where you ride, it might be worth looking into, not just for possible flats. It would be good in a car too when traveling.

TT
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Tire blow out a couple of days ago...

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Slime in the tubes and highly puncture resistant tires wouldn't have helped! Had my flat kit with me. Back on the road in 17 minutes with the spare tube...just sayin' 😎
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
After damaging an OEM tire when hitting a big pot hole (ALL my fault), I switched to Schwalbe Marathons (26x2") because of their excellent reputation. AND I run Slime. Have for a while now, and wouldn't be without.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Specialized Electrak 2.0 Armadillo with Gripton compound if you are going with inner tubes.

If you really would like to be relieved on the puncture resistance, think of tubeless-ready rims and go tubeless. Punctures to tubeless tyres are self repairing, bigger punctures can be repaired without removing the wheel, and slashes can also be easily repaired after taking the wheel off. The bonus is lower inflation pressure, making rides more comfy.
 
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Luv2ride

Active Member
Thank you all so much for your input. It was good of you to take the time to respond and add links. I am grateful.
Tannus armour can be installed by your shop and provides protection at the center and sides of the tire. I still have my shop fill the tube with slime as well.
I had one flat early on with a half inch piece of metal that managed to penetrate everything, but have gone 10,000 miles with no flats since!
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
Specialized Electrak 2.0 Armadillo with Gripton compound if you are going with inner tubes.

If you really would like to be relieved on the puncture resistance, think of tubeless-ready rims and go tubeless. Punctures to tubeless tyres are self repairing, bigger punctures can be repaired without removing the wheel, and slashes can also be easily repaired after taking the wheel off. The bonus is lower inflation pressure, making rides more comfy.
If you have tubeless rims and tires, fine, but I still don't understand why they are any better than tires with tubes with Slime. Maybe ease of repairing bigger punctures is the answer? As for repairing without removing the wheel, that's exactly what I did with a flat on my Rad Rover's rear wheel the last time it had a flat (without Slime).

TT
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
If you have tubeless rims and tires, fine, but I still don't understand why they are any better than tires with tubes with Slime. Maybe ease of repairing bigger punctures is the answer? As for repairing without removing the wheel, that's exactly what I did with a flat on my Rad Rover's rear wheel the last time it had a flat (without Slime).

TT
Ask yourself first why cars do not use tubes nowadays... OK, let me answer.

The tubeless tyres are typically filled with a sealant. In case of a puncture with a small object such as thorn, you just remove the object from the tyre and the sealant does its job. Often, it is even not necessary to re-inflate the tyre (as these are ridden at relatively low pressure); MTBers often carry a mini-pump with them though. In case of more serious puncture (of size of a nail), the repair kit includes simple tools to push a piece of "bacon strip" into the hole from outside. The repair is easy, fast, no need to remove the wheel and you can continue your ride very soon. In case there is a cut in the side-wall of the tyre, it can be patched from inside with a folded dollar bill (a known hack).

The simplicity of repairing tubeless tyres won these for the MTB world. That, the fact you can ride with low pressure; and the tubeless-rigged wheel are lightweight are bonuses.

I'm using the following tyres:
  • Electrak 2.0 Armadillo 51-622 with Michelin Protek Max inner tubes on my Vado
  • Schwalbe Marathon e-Plus 40-622 with Michelin Protek Max inner tubes on my Lovelec
  • Maxxis 27.5x2.6" tubeless tyres on my Giant Trance E+
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
I've never had tubeless tires, but I haven't heard anything about them that tempts me to switch over to them. They may be great for hardcore MTBs but from everything I've heard it seems to me that for "normal" road/trail riding the benefits of tubeless are probably more theoretical than practical.

I'm not saying that if I had tubeless tires I'd switch to tubes, but, best I can tell, the cost/benefit of switching from tubed to tubeless isn't there either.

The bottom line is you don't get flats on your tubeless tires with Slime (or equivalent) and I don't get flats on my tubed tires with Slime.

TT
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Maybe. That's why I said it, but there's also this:

TT
  • You cannot get a pinch flat (a.k.a. snake-bite) with tubeless tyre
  • Lower pressure = less bumpy ride
  • Lower pressure = better traction
  • Less of rolling resistance in rough terrain
  • Lightweight wheel.
I have compared two wheels: 28x1.5" tubular (Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus with "slimed" Michelin Protek Max inner tube), and a 27.5x2.6" tubeless (Maxxis Minion DHF). Both wheels weigh 2.5 kg. Both wheels have similar outer diameter (around 710 mm). Yet the tubular wheel has to be inflated to 5 bar (or 70 psi) for best road performance but the "fat" tubeless tyre can easily run on 1.4 bar (20 psi) with many times air volume for grip and ride comfort. And it cannot get the pinch flat.

You do not need to agree with me. I keep tubular tyres on two of my three e-bikes, for road use. I never dare ride into the sand or just into the forest on any of those two bikes.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
  • You cannot get a pinch flat (a.k.a. snake-bite) with tubeless tyre
  • Lower pressure = less bumpy ride
  • Lower pressure = better traction
  • Less of rolling resistance in rough terrain
  • Lightweight wheel.
I have compared two wheels: 28x1.5" tubular (Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus with "slimed" Michelin Protek Max inner tube), and a 27.5x2.6" tubeless (Maxxis Minion DHF). Both wheels weigh 2.5 kg. Both wheels have similar outer diameter (around 710 mm). Yet the tubular wheel has to be inflated to 5 bar (or 70 psi) for best road performance but the "fat" tubeless tyre can easily run on 1.4 bar (20 psi) with many times air volume for grip and ride comfort. And it cannot get the pinch flat.

You do not need to agree with me. I keep tubular tyres on two of my three e-bikes, for road use. I never dare ride into the sand or just into the forest on any of those two bikes.
BUT if you also add the Tannus Armour inserts you CAN run lower pressures WITH tubes if you choose. https://tannusamerica.com/products/tannus-armour
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
You cannot get a pinch flat (a.k.a. snake-bite) with tubeless tyre
  • Lower pressure = less bumpy ride
  • Lower pressure = better traction
  • Less of rolling resistance in rough terrain
  • Lightweight wheel.
I have compared two wheels: 28x1.5" tubular (Schwalbe Marathon E-Plus with "slimed" Michelin Protek Max inner tube), and a 27.5x2.6" tubeless (Maxxis Minion DHF). Both wheels weigh 2.5 kg. Both wheels have similar outer diameter (around 710 mm). Yet the tubular wheel has to be inflated to 5 bar (or 70 psi) for best road performance but the "fat" tubeless tyre can easily run on 1.4 bar (20 psi) with many times air volume for grip and ride comfort. And it cannot get the pinch flat. You do not need to agree with me. I keep tubular tyres on two of my three e-bikes, for road use. I never dare ride into the sand or just into the forest on any of those two bikes.
Just FYI - a Tubular tire is also known as a Sew-up Pro road tire... very different from a standard tube+tire combination.

In the professional bicycling world, there are 3 types of tires... Clincher, Tubular, and Tubeless. I hope this wiki helps. 😉

A tubular tyre, referred to as a tub in Britain, a sew-up in the US, a single in Australia or just a tubular is a bicycle tyre that is stitched closed around the inner tube to form a torus. The combination is then glued (sometimes with two-sided tape) onto a specially designed rim, referred to as a "sprint rim" in Britain, and just a "tubular rim" in the US, of a bicycle wheel.

Tubular tyres require more labour to repair a puncture than clincher tyres (wired–on in Britain). The tyre must be removed from the rim, opened up, patched, sewn back up, then finally glued back to the rim. Clinchers have largely replaced tubulars for amateur racing (although they have seen a revival due to the carbon rim being better suited to tubular design), but tubulars are still commonly used for indoor track racing (where the closed track makes punctures from road debris less commonplace), professional road racing, road time trials, and cyclo-cross racing.
 
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