TREK ALLANT+ ALL THE MODELS (7, 8, 9), ALL THE *Original* SPECS and my 9-15-19 RIde/Review

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
2 grand for a 5lb weight decrease and slightly better components.
Maybe with carbon rims, carbon everything, lightest components will get to 38-40lb.

6-7k... that’s Stromer/R&M territory.
The Aluminum Allante in red , +8s , is a really good option.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Yes it is a great point and well done Trek !
Are all the Allante ( i like to call her Allante 😉, not Allant sounds too blant) models equipped for the 2nd battery ? That can make this model a very hot seller.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member

Nooo!!! :eek: What happened to the 40 lbs posted by the OP? I knew it was too good to be true. Yes, I checked a German site and it says 41 pounds for the speed version (18.8 KG)!

Well 40 seems far-fetched but a carbon frame and shedding the suspension fork, it seems it would come in easily 50. I figure the weight savings of the Gen 4 motor is offset by the larger battery.

This article says 49 pounds inclusive of battery but its talking about Euro (CX) version I believe. Is there really a 2 lb difference between the PL Speed and the CX motors? It also claims a 7 pound savings vs the aluminum 8.


And to @Ebiker01, yes, you can get the rail attachment to daisy chain the PowerPack batteries. I checked with my dealer and their info led them to believe you had to order the rail with the battery for approx $1K extra (didn't see an option to get just the rail for folks that already own a Powerpack).
 
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John from Connecticut

Well-Known Member
On this topic of the suspension forks: I wonder if there are any fork experts in the house that can throw out some suggestions as to the lightest/best e-bike rated air fork for urban (bad roads) riding? The 7 stocks the Suntour Mobie I believe and I'm not sure if that is an air or coil fork. And I'm betting it isn't the lightest out there. My Haibike and R&M have the Suntour Aion but that fork looks burlier/heavier than necessary for a carbon city commuter.

Edit: answering my own questions: the Rock Shox Paragon gold looks to fit the bill. Minimal branding and matches bike, air, small amount of travel for trekking/city riding and e-bike rated:
View attachment 37493
Howie,

I put this exact Rock Shox Paragon Gold on my Trek XM 700 Commuter and love the difference the shock makes. My bike seems to 'hug' the
road much more so. The steering seems more 'stable', less twitchy and of course there's the smoothing out ( within reason ) of bumps, etc
and reducing road buzz.

Of course this is all subjective, your milage may vary, but I'm very pleased with my Rock Shox and would do it again. I hope this helps.

John
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I wonder if there are any fork experts in the house that can throw out some suggestions as to the lightest/best e-bike rated air fork for urban (bad roads) riding? The 7 stocks the Suntour Mobie I believe and I'm not sure if that is an air or coil fork. And I'm betting it isn't the lightest out there. My Haibike and R&M have the Suntour Aion but that fork looks burlier/heavier than necessary for a carbon city commuter.
Unfortunately, the RockShox won't work on the Allant 9.9. Here's why:
  1. Allant+ 9.9 has a 15mm thru-axle but the RockShox paragon uses 9mm QR.

  2. The paragon was not built for high speed E-bikes. Sure, it works on E-bikes but it was built for acoustic hybrid bikes. High speed E-bikes need a mono or dual channel air spring/chamber.
    The stanchions on an E-bike specific fork are burlier as you alluded. Paragon would look out of place and change the aesthetics of the bike completely on Allant+. It could have worked on the older Dual sport models or XM700+ models.

  3. Travel on the RockShox paragon is 65mm, where as the Allant+ may take 80mm travel fork (looks like it) or even 100mm if it is suspension corrected.
I believe withe redstop stem and running the front tires at 35 psi, the need for suspension will be largely mitigated.
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, the RockShox won't work on the Allant 9.9. Here's why:
  1. Allant+ 9.9 has a 15mm thru-axle but the RockShox paragon uses 9mm QR.

  2. The paragon was not built for high speed E-bikes. Sure, it works on E-bikes but it was built for acoustic hybrid bikes. High speed E-bikes need a mono or dual channel air spring/chamber.
    The stanchions on a E-bike specific fork are burlier as you alluded. Paragon would look out of place and change the aesthetics of the bike completely on Allant+. It could have worked on the older Dual sport models or XM700+ models.

  3. The travel on the RockShox paragon is 65mm, where as the Allant+ may take 80mm travel fork (looks like it) or even 100mm if it is suspension corrected.
I believe withe redstop stem and running the front tires at 35 psi, the need for suspension will be largely mitigated.
Thanks Ravi. I wonder if it is also not possible to switch to the Shockstop stem. I'm not for sure but it looks like Trek used a proprietary stem that acts as a cable router for the carbon version. It is adjustable. On the aluminum bikes, the cables are routed internally through the frame. This is what I pieced together from the short Trek video and their website.
 

Captain Slow

Active Member
At around 50-55 lbs. this bike is not nearly as attractive as it was when it was reported to be in the 40 lb. range.

After owning my Juiced CCS, I'm not a fan of class 3 bikes that give an upright seating position. You just catch so much air and burn through the battery quickly. I'd love to see one with a longer top tube for a more stretched out aero position. I suppose there's the Domane+, but I like the utility of this bike with the fenders. Plus this bike is cheaper than the Domane+
 

jim6b

Active Member
At around 50-55 lbs. this bike is not nearly as attractive as it was when it was reported to be in the 40 lb. range.

After owning my Juiced CCS, I'm not a fan of class 3 bikes that give an upright seating position. You just catch so much air and burn through the battery quickly. I'd love to see one with a longer top tube for a more stretched out aero position. I suppose there's the Domane+, but I like the utility of this bike with the fenders. Plus this bike is cheaper than the Domane+
Agree. It looks like there has been no advance from the 2019 Cross RIP at $4,200 and 45 lbs. My hope now is Trek will refresh the CrossRip with the new lighter Bosch motors drop closer to 40 lbs.

Will have to wait and see if Trek brings out a new model or drops the CrossRip and idea of a max speed/range commuter, i.e. one that comes with drop handle bars which improved aero position to provide added speed and extended battery range.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Agree. It looks like there has been no advance from the 2019 Cross RIP at $4,200 and 45 lbs. My hope now is Trek will refresh the CrossRip with the new lighter Bosch motors drop closer to 40 lbs.

Will have to wait and see if Trek brings out a new model or drops the CrossRip and idea of a max speed/range commuter, i.e. one that comes with drop handle bars which improved aero position to provide added speed and extended battery range.
Unlikely that Trek can reach 40 lbs as the new motors only save 1-1.5 lbs max. ;)
 
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opimax

Well-Known Member
It shows a front shock in the picture Ravi posted, I would want all the options shown, they are not on the web sites. I would assume they are coming at some point???
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
At around 50-55 lbs. this bike is not nearly as attractive as it was when it was reported to be in the 40 lb. range.

After owning my Juiced CCS, I'm not a fan of class 3 bikes that give an upright seating position. You just catch so much air and burn through the battery quickly. I'd love to see one with a longer top tube for a more stretched out aero position. I suppose there's the Domane+, but I like the utility of this bike with the fenders. Plus this bike is cheaper than the Domane+
Agree that it isn't as compelling when the weight comes in at +50 pounds.

But not so much agreement on the ride position. For a commuter or trekking bike, I prefer a middle position and flat bars. this is particular to the majority of my riding. I want to see my surroundings. A lot of the commute is city with more of it start and stop in traffic. Not too much long stretches of open road to take advantage of a crouched position. And from Trek's marketing video, looks like they are targeting urban riders. And the capability of carrying 1125 WH should mitigate the inefficiency of a more upright ride:

 

Over50

Well-Known Member
It shows a front shock in the picture Ravi posted, I would want all the options shown, they are not on the web sites. I would assume they are coming at some point???
The lowest version of the Allant+ comes stock with the Suntour Mobie fork. The bikes are suspension corrected so I'm assuming you could add that Suntour fork to any of the Allants. But I was looking for the best and lightest fork available to match a carbon frame bike. I'm not even sure if the Mobie is an air fork. The picture that Ravi posted is not of the Allant+. Somehow Trek put this picture on their website with the Allant+ pictures. Unless there is a belt drive version in the works that Trek hasn't posted yet. They might have been trying to illustrate the rail technology and ability to run two batteries.
 

Captain Slow

Active Member
Yes, 1125 watt hours on board does mitigate the rapid battery loss when travelling fast. I forgot about that.

It does however make an already heavy bike even heavier.

When it doesn't rain, I commute on my road bike more often than my electric and I greatly prefer that position. I've never had an issue where I can't see in front of me well enough. I will consider this bike in the future, but if an updated CrossRip+ comes out, that might be a better commuter for me.

Then again, now that my kids are out of the daycare years I don't worry about the time of my commute nearly as much and I have the luxury of just taking another 10-15 minutes if I need, so I may not even buy another electric.