Trek Conduit+ versus Specialized Turbo

Trek Conduit+ or Specialized Turbo


  • Total voters
    7

dvenardos

New Member
I am looking at my first eBike for an 18 mile hilly commute to work.
I am a rode cyclist and used to commute to work on a touring bike, 700c with drop bars and rack, but a much shorter distance.
I want to start commuting again.

Looking at the reviews, the Trek Conduit+ and Specialized Turbo look to be the best options.
I am leaning toward the Specialized Turbo as it seems to be the most road bike like eBike, but the Trek Conduit+ looks promising as well.

The mid-drive motor on the Conduit+ seems to be a good option for the hilly aspect of my commute, but the Specialized Turbo has a similar range.

How would you compare these two bikes?
Any other recommendations in the 3K range?

I am 5' 10", 190lbs.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
At that price point, I'd aim for a Yamaha powered offering. Particularly if you've got steep (or long) hills. I weigh 200 pounds and would choose a Yamaha powered bike over a STEPs powered one with no hesitation whatsoever. I've demoed a STEPs offering twice now and the drive seems decidedly underpowered to me. Particularly on hills.

@pxpaulx is delighted with his Yamaha powered Haibike (he's on the same side of the scale as me), so perhaps he'll chime in. I've demoed the Euro 2015 (Yamaha powered) trekking model, and would definitely recommend it. It's a nice bike at a nice price. The Sduro Treking SL hovers around the 3K mark and is (apparently) available in the US. It's not exactly a "road bike", but you might surprise yourself and cozy up to the extra versatility. I wanted a Turbo initially but after demoing a lot I realized that a "pure road bike" wouldn't be the right choice for me. So I'm heading in the direction of something that's a little more hybrid. I've even warmed up to "balloon tires" and front suspensions... Go figure...

But if you must choose between the two, I'd say go for the Turbo.
 

RockyMtnCyclist

New Member
I too am a avid cyclist looking for a electric for my commute. Haibike & Specialized were high on my list. As someone that is used to riding high-end road and mountain bikes for years, it was hard to find a electric that had the feel & biomechanics I have come to expect.
If you are putting in serious miles on any bike the fit and biomechanics will greatly improve your comfort and efficiency.
I would encourage you to do a lot of your test riding with the electric assist turned off. The assist can mask the most important characteristics of the bike - how it fits, ergonomics, biomechanics. If you would not want to ride the bike unassisted for your 18 mile commute then it probably isn't the right bike. The actual bike is the foundation. The assist is only valuable when built upon a solid foundation.
Once you find the right "foundation" then start evaluating the feel of the assist.

In my situation, it quickly became apparent that the improved Q-factor (distance between pedals) of hub drive bikes versus mid-drive was a big factor for me. In addition hub drives felt smoother when pedaling at the higher cadence (80-90) I am used to. I also needed a bike that would assist over 20mph. If you are used to riding a road bike, 20mph doesn't feel fast enough.

After test riding almost everything in the market I ended up focusing on the Easy Motion Neo line & Specialized. Full disclosure, I race on a Specialized sponsored amateur team, so I get discounted pricing on their bikes. Haibike, Specialized, and Easy motion all seem to be on the right track. They build a quality bike 1st and then focus on assist.
The Turbo is a great bike, but felt heavier and less responsive than the Easy Motion. Haibike was excellent, but I preferred hub drive. Easy Motion felt responsive and I found a dealer that got close to my discount with Specialized.
I ended up with a Easy Motion Neo Nitro city. The road feel of the bike was excellent and it came fully outfitted for commuting with fenders and a rack.
It should arrive next week. Time will tell if it was the right decision. I don't think I could have gone wrong with either bike.
Long response to your question, but I think the key is to evaluate the bikes unassisted 1st, and then evaluate if the assist feels good and meets your needs.
 
Last edited:

Jack Tyler

Active Member
@RockyMtnCyclist many thanks for that suggestion. I'm beginning some extensive ebike ride testing tomorrow and I don't think I would have considered that approach except for reading your post. Much appreciated!

BTW where are you located?

Jack
Bozeman MT, near the northern end of the U.S. Rockies
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
As a former road bike racer & rider, the improved focus on quality bike construction, components and fit is good to see in the electric bike world. Nice part is that there's something out there for pretty much everyone if the pricier high end ebikes are out of reach. Easy Motion's parent company, BH of Spain has always built great bikes, so their ebikes have been good build from the start. Think you'll have a good experience with the Neo Nitro City, @RockyMtnCyclist , looking forward to your pics and feedback!
 

dvenardos

New Member
Great advice, thanks!

I too am a avid cyclist looking for a electric for my commute. Haibike & Specialized were high on my list. As someone that is used to riding high-end road and mountain bikes for years, it was hard to find a electric that had the feel & biomechanics I have come to expect.
If you are putting in serious miles on any bike the fit and biomechanics will greatly improve your comfort and efficiency.
I would encourage you to do a lot of your test riding with the electric assist turned off. The assist can mask the most important characteristics of the bike - how it fits, ergonomics, biomechanics. If you would not want to ride the bike unassisted for your 18 mile commute then it probably isn't the right bike. The actual bike is the foundation. The assist is only valuable when built upon a solid foundation.
Once you find the right "foundation" then start evaluating the feel of the assist.

In my situation, it quickly became apparent that the improved Q-factor (distance between pedals) of hub drive bikes versus mid-drive was a big factor for me. In addition hub drives felt smoother when pedaling at the higher cadence (80-90) I am used to. I also needed a bike that would assist over 20mph. If you are used to riding a road bike, 20mph doesn't feel fast enough.

After test riding almost everything in the market I ended up focusing on the Easy Motion Neo line & Specialized. Full disclosure, I race on a Specialized sponsored amateur team, so I get discounted pricing on their bikes. Haibike, Specialized, and Easy motion all seem to be on the right track. They build a quality bike 1st and then focus on assist.
The Turbo is a great bike, but felt heavier and less responsive than the Easy Motion. Haibike was excellent, but I preferred hub drive. Easy Motion felt responsive and I found a dealer that got close to my discount with Specialized.
I ended up with a Easy Motion Neo Nitro city. The road feel of the bike was excellent and it came fully outfitted for commuting with fenders and a rack.
It should arrive next week. Time will tell if it was the right decision. I don't think I could have gone wrong with either bike.
Long response to your question, but I think the key is to evaluate the bikes unassisted 1st, and then evaluate if the assist feels good and meets your needs.