Trek Domane +HP 2021

Lefkop

New Member
Last Sunday I made the purchase of the Domane +HP as I wanted to pick up a e-road bike. I did try for a few days a Creo SL which was a nice bike but suffice to say it wasn't for me for several reasons. The moment I rode the Domane I could instantly feel how this bike differs from many others and why it makes sense for my intended usage. For those who are interested in this bike as there is almost nothing out there about it to read about, here goes some thoughts after riding it now for some 250 miles in less than 6 days.

The weight: yes it has a pedal assist motor and 500 watt hour battery there is wt involved and certainly not as light as a Creo (in comparison), however the weight distribution does feels better and the bike is certainly more planted. I often will pedal with the assist motor off or in eco mode (flats or down hills) and the rolling weight difference is really not an issue. With the Domane, I feel there better control of the bike and perhaps its because of the weight and the frame angles utilized - this is controversial for sure but without doing the science, Im attributing however incorrectly this to distributive forces of me on bike, bike on ground and ground reaction forces.

Pedal Assist Drive: This is the bosch Gen 4 speed performance device and works well. I also have an EMTB that is obviously tuned to higher initial torque and I tell you this because of the expectations of off the line torque coming from that ride to this one is completely different. This bike is made for sustained and higher road speeds, I have found that it is best from a standing start to run through your gears to pick up speed. This particular motor is tuned appropriately for its application but relying on the bike to instantly zoom you from zero to 15 miles an hour as you start out from a stop in a higher gear like a high torque EMTB can, you will have to change your thinking. Don't misunderstand the pedal assist is there, its just not a torquey jolt.

On hills the motor can provide you with all types of assist and you can vary your input to achieve the goal of the climb your looking for. Should you want to train the legs for more strength eco and touring, should you want to attempt a KOM than sport or turbo. What I really enjoy about this pedal assist drive over that of say the Creo SL or the Vado Sl (which I test rode for a few miles) is the ability to have these choices in assist level. Not to disparage the Specialized, its just bikes I some have experience with, the flexibility of the greater power in the assist drive is a greater benefit than the weight difference. The Domane can easily attain its 28 mph limit and help you to sustain in and around this range even in very hilly terrain, which is where I live.

The motor responds well to your input and doesn't surge your forward in anyway. As you apply torque you can feel a little extra push and when you stop it stops. When riding you really don't notice anything different than if you just rode an analogue bike, except your going faster or your not grinding out that hill in front of you (should you choose do that you can)

Battery life: Yes of my main concerns. I regularly ride 30 plus miles, pretty much daily. This is where this bike certainly shines. As an example 30 mile ride with 1722 feet of elevation change and 1 hour 32 min on the road, I returned home with about approximately 50% power. I rode the bike with intention maximizing the use of power but not throttling myself to the point of why did I buy an ebike in the first place. To use the power when I need it and not use it when I don't; at the end of this ride the data demonstrated an approximately 50/50 relationship between motor assist and myself as input with the the average speed is around 21 MPH.

Battery life trade offs are of course human input to electric assist, the more assist the less battery life. If you want to run on Turbo or Sport you will certainly increase your average speed and you will watch the battery drain quickly which is expected, but you'll get there quicker so for a commute this can be very effective. I have yet to try a full on turbo ride, I may do this for a calculation on percentage drain per minute - just for fun. Suffice to say, Bosch has battery estimator and it seems pretty much in the ballpark of what I am getting. I am also not a heavy rider about 158-160 lbs so the bike and me are under 200 lbs.

As an aside and In comparison to the Creo SL EVO that I had, I was able to get 33 miles before battery emptied and that was working with it in its eco and middle modes, not on turbo. To add a secondary battery it would be an additional 500 dollars, plus cable cost and water bottle holder cost. This add on option would bring the watt hours up to approximately equal with the Trek however with the Domane you can add on an additional 500 watt hours. I would presume that based on my initial findings the Creo would achieve near that same range as the Trek (with its single battery), but still would come up short by a few miles with the additional watt hours.

Bike Fit and Finish - yes this is high quality performance bike. Yes its been to the shop a couple of times now. A firmware update to the bike was done at the time of purchase and it did mess up the function of the lighting package and it needs to be sorted out. I am also having issues when I go over a bump heavily, the bike shuts off. I took the bike in last evening and it seems that battery alignment may be off and they need to adjust this. Finally off the showroom floor and onto the street, the rear derailleur was not adjusted correctly and the chain was slipping. I was able to perform an adjustment which by enlarge fixed the problem. The shop at the same time as fixing the lighting /software issue, also performed some adjustments to fix the chain slippage. I am happy about the service they provided but underwhelmed that the high dollar bike would be allowed to leave the shop without a full inspection to ensure everything was in top flight running order. Frame, Brakes and everything else is nice. If you want to get super OCD, the very bright front light has to cables that run in front of it, not centrally but to the sides... its not a practical issue just annoying as you would think it could be better.

The integrated lighting package is excellent btw and its absolutely necessary. In my Creo experience (again not to bash in anyway) I would have had to add on this feature.

Ride quality: Yes this bike is fantastic for ride quality. There is very low motor noise, of course its there but its not going to bother you should you desire total silence you can turn this feature off LOL, Road noise in minimal. Riding is fantastic as the bike / seat soaks up road vibration very well. No issues with wrists getting fatigued or hands becoming numb. Its a very comfortable experience. The bike also seems fast. In that just peddling the bike you achieve and maintain speed quickly.

Controller: I do very much like the layout overall the buttons are big an on the left hand side but I wish they had the ability to back light to see them at night. I also feel that perhaps a switch for power settings could be incorporated into the drop bar behind the brake which would make switching a whole lot better. Of course Bosch doesn't make the brake levers and Shimano doesn't make switches for Bosch .... so yeah aint gonna happen. Given the parameters of the bike, the controller does what is supposed to do, yes it could be more efficient. PS the walk button is activated but is placed in an impractical place to really access, unlike on my EMTB the walk function is easily activation and utilized. To be fair your in all likelihood never going to use this functionality and if you have to walk, its a pretty light bike anyway but it should have been better thought out to begin with.

Overall: TLDR. So far I am liking this bike a lot, I am not a "roadie" per say, I generally ride the trails. Its fundamentally a bike you have to learn. A ride or two will determine if it fits you well in terms of comfort and purpose, You then have to learn how to perform with this bike. Its forgiving in that you have the power when you want or need it but you still to pay attention to road and shift in accordance with terrain + cadence to get the most out of it. Test rides in parking lots on flats are helpful but this bike offers a lot of performance which you can't appreciate until you put some seat time in and that's hard decision to make when these bikes are ahemmm ... not cheap
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thank you for an outstanding, in depth review of an intriguing bike's functional features.

I own and love riding a Trek Allant+ 9.9s. I purchased it after test riding a Creo but before Trek had released the Domiane+ HP which has a similar drivetrain but is more road bike and less commuter. for me, a heavier and older rider, a flat handlebar made more sense than drop bars. I have heard of people retrofitting an HP with a flat handlebar. Do you have any thoughts on this modification?

I think Trek is offering a level of refinement and design quality and choices that puts it at or near the front of the ebike revolution.
 

Stiksandstones

New Member
What a review!
I own the same bike, I put SRAM drivetrain and SRAM brakes on mine-along with flat bars. My 2 day a week commute is 60miles round trip, I have to charge it when I get to work because I am using 100% battery on each of the 30 mile trips. I do have the spare battery coming from Bosch though. I do love this bike, I had tried to do this commute on my road bike-but was too tired to do it all-this bike makes it doable. pic here: http://instagr.am/p/CC4YVfqHv5D/
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Here is a shot of my Allant 9.9 My drivetrain mods are: 10-51 tooth cassette, Onyx microspline, instant engagement hub and the Sram AXS wireless derailleur. I also put a Baramind , flexible, shock absorbing handlebar on it.
20200718_135151 (1).jpg
 

SoCalDave

Member
What a review!
I own the same bike, I put SRAM drivetrain and SRAM brakes on mine-along with flat bars. My 2 day a week commute is 60miles round trip, I have to charge it when I get to work because I am using 100% battery on each of the 30 mile trips. I do have the spare battery coming from Bosch though. I do love this bike, I had tried to do this commute on my road bike-but was too tired to do it all-this bike makes it doable. pic here: http://instagr.am/p/CC4YVfqHv5D/

I am hoping that eventually Trek or Cannondale or some other major manufacturer will come out with a high quality road bike carbon frame with a Bosch drive and flat bars from the factory. There are many older riders who might have done a lot of drop bar riding in their lives, but who would like a more upright position as they age. Pre e-bikes, I generally rode drop bars most of my life, but enjoyed flat bars also. For me, the only disadvantage with flat bars was a less aerodynamic position, but of course e-bikes make that less important. I currently ride a 2019 Cannondale Quick Neo, but still occasionally ride a Cannondale Synapse Di2 Carbon road bike, and I like the feel of carbon, compared to aluminum.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I posted first about the Domane +HP around 8-9months ago. Vastly superior to Creo.
But then you have people who spend 6-7k on worthless Fazua driven ebikes. Creo is way above those but lacks the +HO power.
And also Trek has their own shops throughout the Us.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
Here is a shot of my Allant 9.9 My drivetrain mods are: 10-51 tooth cassette, Onyx microspline, instant engagement hub and the Sram AXS wireless derailleur. I also put a Baramind , flexible, shock absorbing handlebar on it.
View attachment 63809



Does it take a rear rack ? It looks like it could take Ortlieb panniers in the rear so that's probably good enough.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
It accepts paniers just fine on the rails that double up as fender stays. One can easily add on a topeak Beam Rack that clamps on to the seat post to add a trunk bag. Racktime also makes a similar rack that accepts racktime compatible trunk bags. Also, those fenders on the 9.9 are solid alloy fenders that never rattle or need adjustment.
 
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Lefkop

New Member
Thank you for an outstanding, in depth review of an intriguing bike's functional features.

I own and love riding a Trek Allant+ 9.9s. I purchased it after test riding a Creo but before Trek had released the Domiane+ HP which has a similar drivetrain but is more road bike and less commuter. for me, a heavier and older rider, a flat handlebar made more sense than drop bars. I have heard of people retrofitting an HP with a flat handlebar. Do you have any thoughts on this modification?

I think Trek is offering a level of refinement and design quality and choices that puts it at or near the front of the ebike revolution.

I love the idea of modifications that make sense for how you want to ride, rather than what people feel is the way you should ride, The flat bars look cool and they offer great stability along with comfort.
 

Lefkop

New Member
Here is a shot of my Allant 9.9 My drivetrain mods are: 10-51 tooth cassette, Onyx microspline, instant engagement hub and the Sram AXS wireless derailleur. I also put a Baramind , flexible, shock absorbing handlebar on it.
View attachment 63809
Sweet looking ride. Have you considered clips instead of traditional pedals? Clips for me really helps with efficiency, I use the Shamino quick release multi-angle. Anything that looks dodgey, I un-clip in advance ... Ive eaten it a few more times than I would like too
 

SoCalDave

Member
Here is a shot of my Allant 9.9 My drivetrain mods are: 10-51 tooth cassette, Onyx microspline, instant engagement hub and the Sram AXS wireless derailleur. I also put a Baramind , flexible, shock absorbing handlebar on it.
View attachment 63809
How is the Baramind? That is, does it flex enough to absorb some shock on somewhat rough pavement, preventing hand fatigue, without feeling too “rubbery” in terms of steering control?
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
I'm surprised you only got 30 miles on the Creo on a full battery. Today I did a 86 km ride with 950 meters of elevation gain and I only used 35% of my battery. But perhaps your average speed is higher, our average speed was only 21.5 km/hr.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
A agree about the comparison between the Bosch Gen 4 motor and the Creo motor. I took a Creo for a test ride before Covid hit and although I really like riding the bike I

wished it had more power on the steeper hills. This isn't a problem with my Cannondale Neo Lefty 3, which has the Gen 4 motor.

Even though the bike weighs 40 pounds I do at least a third of most rides with the power off. Yesterday, I did a 57km ride and when I got home the display was still showing all

five of the battery bars! Mind you, my average speed for most rides is around 21/22kph.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
Yes my average speed was just around 20 mph, or 32 km/h ...
I've always wondered how much more power I'd use as speeds increase. I find that at lower speeds I normally use a bit less than 2 wh per km, but it can vary significantly and I've used as little at 0.6 wh/km.

I went back to a solo ride I did at 29 km/hr. with some elevation gain (about 10 meters per km) and I used 3.5 wh/km.

Power needs increase exponentially with speed so I can see how you used a lot more power to go the speeds you did.

It might be fun to buy a range extender and go faster, but I probably wouldn't do that very often. It would really just be solo rides, otherwise I'd be dropping my ride companions and while it might be kind of novel and fun I don't think it makes sense for how little I'd use it.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
How is the Baramind? That is, does it flex enough to absorb some shock on somewhat rough pavement, preventing hand fatigue, without feeling too “rubbery” in terms of steering control?
The Baramind handlebar is fantastic, the biggest improvement for the least money of any add on I have used. It really makes a big difference in the hands and forearms. I really don't notice it in terms of feeling rubbery or unstable. I am sure I would notice it and be less than happy if it were not there.

The Baramind combined with the Kinekt Body Float seatpost make for an amazingly comfortable ride on a bike with no suspension. 50+ mile rides with three hours in the saddle are pain free, and I am not a young guy (turning 70 in October).
 

Ezliven

New Member
Last Sunday I made the purchase of the Domane +HP as I wanted to pick up a e-road bike. I did try for a few days a Creo SL which was a nice bike but suffice to say it wasn't for me for several reasons. The moment I rode the Domane I could instantly feel how this bike differs from many others and why it makes sense for my intended usage. For those who are interested in this bike as there is almost nothing out there about it to read about, here goes some thoughts after riding it now for some 250 miles in less than 6 days.

The weight: yes it has a pedal assist motor and 500 watt hour battery there is wt involved and certainly not as light as a Creo (in comparison), however the weight distribution does feels better and the bike is certainly more planted. I often will pedal with the assist motor off or in eco mode (flats or down hills) and the rolling weight difference is really not an issue. With the Domane, I feel there better control of the bike and perhaps its because of the weight and the frame angles utilized - this is controversial for sure but without doing the science, Im attributing however incorrectly this to distributive forces of me on bike, bike on ground and ground reaction forces.

Pedal Assist Drive: This is the bosch Gen 4 speed performance device and works well. I also have an EMTB that is obviously tuned to higher initial torque and I tell you this because of the expectations of off the line torque coming from that ride to this one is completely different. This bike is made for sustained and higher road speeds, I have found that it is best from a standing start to run through your gears to pick up speed. This particular motor is tuned appropriately for its application but relying on the bike to instantly zoom you from zero to 15 miles an hour as you start out from a stop in a higher gear like a high torque EMTB can, you will have to change your thinking. Don't misunderstand the pedal assist is there, its just not a torquey jolt.

On hills the motor can provide you with all types of assist and you can vary your input to achieve the goal of the climb your looking for. Should you want to train the legs for more strength eco and touring, should you want to attempt a KOM than sport or turbo. What I really enjoy about this pedal assist drive over that of say the Creo SL or the Vado Sl (which I test rode for a few miles) is the ability to have these choices in assist level. Not to disparage the Specialized, its just bikes I some have experience with, the flexibility of the greater power in the assist drive is a greater benefit than the weight difference. The Domane can easily attain its 28 mph limit and help you to sustain in and around this range even in very hilly terrain, which is where I live.

The motor responds well to your input and doesn't surge your forward in anyway. As you apply torque you can feel a little extra push and when you stop it stops. When riding you really don't notice anything different than if you just rode an analogue bike, except your going faster or your not grinding out that hill in front of you (should you choose do that you can)

Battery life: Yes of my main concerns. I regularly ride 30 plus miles, pretty much daily. This is where this bike certainly shines. As an example 30 mile ride with 1722 feet of elevation change and 1 hour 32 min on the road, I returned home with about approximately 50% power. I rode the bike with intention maximizing the use of power but not throttling myself to the point of why did I buy an ebike in the first place. To use the power when I need it and not use it when I don't; at the end of this ride the data demonstrated an approximately 50/50 relationship between motor assist and myself as input with the the average speed is around 21 MPH.

Battery life trade offs are of course human input to electric assist, the more assist the less battery life. If you want to run on Turbo or Sport you will certainly increase your average speed and you will watch the battery drain quickly which is expected, but you'll get there quicker so for a commute this can be very effective. I have yet to try a full on turbo ride, I may do this for a calculation on percentage drain per minute - just for fun. Suffice to say, Bosch has battery estimator and it seems pretty much in the ballpark of what I am getting. I am also not a heavy rider about 158-160 lbs so the bike and me are under 200 lbs.

As an aside and In comparison to the Creo SL EVO that I had, I was able to get 33 miles before battery emptied and that was working with it in its eco and middle modes, not on turbo. To add a secondary battery it would be an additional 500 dollars, plus cable cost and water bottle holder cost. This add on option would bring the watt hours up to approximately equal with the Trek however with the Domane you can add on an additional 500 watt hours. I would presume that based on my initial findings the Creo would achieve near that same range as the Trek (with its single battery), but still would come up short by a few miles with the additional watt hours.

Bike Fit and Finish - yes this is high quality performance bike. Yes its been to the shop a couple of times now. A firmware update to the bike was done at the time of purchase and it did mess up the function of the lighting package and it needs to be sorted out. I am also having issues when I go over a bump heavily, the bike shuts off. I took the bike in last evening and it seems that battery alignment may be off and they need to adjust this. Finally off the showroom floor and onto the street, the rear derailleur was not adjusted correctly and the chain was slipping. I was able to perform an adjustment which by enlarge fixed the problem. The shop at the same time as fixing the lighting /software issue, also performed some adjustments to fix the chain slippage. I am happy about the service they provided but underwhelmed that the high dollar bike would be allowed to leave the shop without a full inspection to ensure everything was in top flight running order. Frame, Brakes and everything else is nice. If you want to get super OCD, the very bright front light has to cables that run in front of it, not centrally but to the sides... its not a practical issue just annoying as you would think it could be better.

The integrated lighting package is excellent btw and its absolutely necessary. In my Creo experience (again not to bash in anyway) I would have had to add on this feature.

Ride quality: Yes this bike is fantastic for ride quality. There is very low motor noise, of course its there but its not going to bother you should you desire total silence you can turn this feature off LOL, Road noise in minimal. Riding is fantastic as the bike / seat soaks up road vibration very well. No issues with wrists getting fatigued or hands becoming numb. Its a very comfortable experience. The bike also seems fast. In that just peddling the bike you achieve and maintain speed quickly.

Controller: I do very much like the layout overall the buttons are big an on the left hand side but I wish they had the ability to back light to see them at night. I also feel that perhaps a switch for power settings could be incorporated into the drop bar behind the brake which would make switching a whole lot better. Of course Bosch doesn't make the brake levers and Shimano doesn't make switches for Bosch .... so yeah aint gonna happen. Given the parameters of the bike, the controller does what is supposed to do, yes it could be more efficient. PS the walk button is activated but is placed in an impractical place to really access, unlike on my EMTB the walk function is easily activation and utilized. To be fair your in all likelihood never going to use this functionality and if you have to walk, its a pretty light bike anyway but it should have been better thought out to begin with.

Overall: TLDR. So far I am liking this bike a lot, I am not a "roadie" per say, I generally ride the trails. Its fundamentally a bike you have to learn. A ride or two will determine if it fits you well in terms of comfort and purpose, You then have to learn how to perform with this bike. Its forgiving in that you have the power when you want or need it but you still to pay attention to road and shift in accordance with terrain + cadence to get the most out of it. Test rides in parking lots on flats are helpful but this bike offers a lot of performance which you can't appreciate until you put some seat time in and that's hard decision to make when these bikes are ahemmm ... not cheap

I've been posting about the Domane HP+7 since July here: https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/trek-domane-hp.31829/post-298728 and pictures here: https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/trek-domane-hp.31829/post-298728. Since I have over 1200 miles on mine and really enjoy riding it. Takes a few rides to get used to the weight but now feels normal to me.
 

SoCalDave

Member
The Baramind handlebar is fantastic, the biggest improvement for the least money of any add on I have used. It really makes a big difference in the hands and forearms. I really don't notice it in terms of feeling rubbery or unstable. I am sure I would notice it and be less than happy if it were not there.

The Baramind combined with the Kinekt Body Float seatpost make for an amazingly comfortable ride on a bike with no suspension. 50+ mile rides with three hours in the saddle are pain free, and I am not a young guy (turning 70 in October).

Thanks for the feedback and good luck on your recovery. I am not riding right now since I had a left hip replacement in July. I am walking a lot and will get back on the bike soon.
 

SayHey

New Member
Thanks for all of your posts, reviews, and real time experiences. I’ve ordered a Domane+ HP7 and it‘s scheduled to arrive at the end of the year. I thought I was going to buy a Creo but ended up with the HP7 - all things considered a better fit for me. Thanks again as you all helped me clarify.