Triage or Emergency Medical Kit for biking Recommendation?

MartsEbike

Well-Known Member
Region
Other
I carry a small kit - much like the "Medpack" posted above but purchased at a local supermarket, fits inside my saddle bag with the rest of my bits and bobs. Luckily not had to use it yet but its always carried just in case.

-(edit)-

Should add, I much prefer the "soft pack" kits instead of the hard carry case type, as you can squash them into anywhere.... Saddle Bags, Top Tube Bags, even your coat pocket and you barely know you have it on you... If the kit is too big to be easily carried you might risk not taking it... and that'll be the time you need it.
 
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RandallS

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Calgary
I carry one of my wife's "expired" epi-pens, as it's better than nothing if you come across someone in serious anaphylaxis. Other stuff too of course.

Excellent discussion!
 

Oberst

Well-Known Member
There are a couple of things that aren't in your typical first-aid-kit that are nonetheless useful to bring along:

Notepad and pen. This one is real important and also pretty obvious. Most of us don't have a huge amount of experience, thankfully, with medical emergencies. Being able to write everything relevant down before calling 911 is pretty valuable in itself and will make sure you get all the information to the 911 folks. Also, if you can't reach 911 where you are you can give your notes to another cyclist or a passing car and have them go someplace where they can call 911 (in this case the written description is even more important). It is also a good place to record vital signs (like pulse and respiration) and collect a patient's medical history.

Ace bandage or similar. These are super-useful. Since ankle and knee injuries are fairly common cycling ailments, and in cases of minor injury an ace bandage may make a leisurely self-rescue possible rather than a full-on evacuation. They also can be used as improvised cravats. There are also some cool ones that stick to themselves, though they are not reusable.

Bandanas. They are useful as cravats and have numerous other uses both in emergencies and not.

Ibuprofen. Not the couple of tablets in any first aid kit, but a small bottle with a couple of dozen tablets. You might also talk to your doctor and see if they will write a prescription for some serious horse pills (800mg or 1000mg ibuprofen).

Athletic tape. This is handy for holding wound treatments in place, and for taping spots where things are chafing (and if you ride far and fast you will find that, at some point, you will chafe most anywhere).

Soap. While there are various tinctures and glops and gels with antibiotic properties, plain old soap goes a long way and does less damage to the delicate tissue in a wound. Find a tiny squeeze bottle and put some Ivory Liquid or Dr. Bronner's soap in it.

Electrolytes. If you do bonk out and get seriously dehydrated, you've probably blown out on electrolytes too. They can also be enormously helpful for treating cramps. In a pinch pickle juice or little packets of mustard also treat cramps. Nuun and Hammer Endurolyte are good brands. The fizzy tablets don't foul up water bottles.

Treatment for saddle sores. There are various products out there and when you need them, you need them badly. Vaseline from the baby section of a grocery store also works.
Agree with your comments. I was doing mountaineering and wanted to learn first aid which led to being a volunteer EMS person. Education is the FIRST thing to have in a first aid kit.
 

Rincon

Well-Known Member
Other than road rash, one of the most common bicycle injuries is a broken collarbone. All that can really be done with that right away is to sling that arm against the torso, and an inner tube could work well for that.
I've done exactly that. I had to walk two miles down a mountain bike trail with my arm in a tube sling. My buddy walked the bikes out. We drove an hour to the nearest hospital. The doc checked for concussion; my helmet was smashed, I was knocked unconscious, and I had seen stars. Other than the collarbone, I was alright. I got a morphine shot, swapped the inner tube for a medical sling, and was sent home. Six weeks later I was good as new. I now carry a basic first aid kit as many here have described.

 
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Elkman

Active Member
The human body is very tough and blood loss is the one type of injury that can be truly life threatening. That is where a Quikclot bandage and some duct tape is invaluable. Duct tape works well to make a splint in an emergency but then again people should act more cautiously when in the back country where help is far away and cell phone service may be unavailable. I saw sailors take far more risks after sat phones became available and people had the expectation that rescuers would save the day and the same applies to the hikers and climbers who seem to want to make next year's Darwin Awards.

It is crazy for anyone to think that a $15 Quikclot bandage is too costly. I value my life a lot more than that. I paid more than that for my Mr Tuffy tire tube protectors.
 

Gordon71

Well-Known Member
Just gonna throw this out there. I suspect (based on some of the videos I've seen) that the best first aid kit is already on the bike. Brakes.
 

dmourati

Member
Region
USA
City
Mountain View
I got this from a Youtube channel named Skinny Medic:

(2) 5x9 Trauma Dressings
(5) 4x4 Gauze Sponges
(5) Butterfly Bandages
(2) Band aids
(2) Triangle bandages w/ safety pins
(2) Rolls of 3' cling
(6) Alcohol pads
(2) Triple antibiotic ointment
(1) One inch roll cloth tape
(1) EMT scissors
(4) Large non-latex gloves
(1) Aspirin 325 - 2 tablets
(1) Ibuprofen 200mg - 2 tablets
(1) Tylenol 500mg - 2 tablets
(1) Benadryl 25mg
(6) Bite and Sting Pads

(1) C-A-T Tourniquet
(1) 6'' Israeli Bandage Dressing
(1) CPR Shield
(1) Nasopharyngeal Airway (NPA) 28F with Lubricant

I fit it all, in this pack:


A little expensive, but I initially bought it for hiking with my young kid. Has proven useful so far.
 

zipur

Active Member
Region
USA
Well this has been interesting. I continue to believe having "Some Stuff" is better than just depending on your brain cells.
Accidents happen, it may not be your fault, it could be another person you come across. Yes my kit isn't a full-blown-combat pack, but it will due in a pinch.
Having a something is better than wishing you had it.
 
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Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I got this from a Youtube channel named Skinny Medic:

(2) 5x9 Trauma Dressings
(5) 4x4 Gauze Sponges
(5) Butterfly Bandages
(2) Band aids
(2) Triangle bandages w/ safety pins
(2) Rolls of 3' cling
(6) Alcohol pads
(2) Triple antibiotic ointment
(1) One inch roll cloth tape
(1) EMT scissors
(4) Large non-latex gloves
(1) Aspirin 325 - 2 tablets
(1) Ibuprofen 200mg - 2 tablets
(1) Tylenol 500mg - 2 tablets
(1) Benadryl 25mg
(6) Bite and Sting Pads

(1) C-A-T Tourniquet
(1) 6'' Israeli Bandage Dressing
(1) CPR Shield
(1) Nasopharyngeal Airway (NPA) 28F with Lubricant

I fit it all, in this pack:


A little expensive, but I initially bought it for hiking with my young kid. Has proven useful so far.

Looks complete and more up to date than mine. I need to take a look inside mine but I just pack my stuff in ziplock bags inside a red zipper bag.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Some of you ride some remote areas alone. Remember these are just bycycles ...not ICE dirtbikes. If you don't know what you're doing in the wilderness, go with someone who does.
If you do know, great.Try taking somebody that wants to learn.
Back to the medkits, kids injuries are different from seniors, and summer injuries different from winter, the bikes small kit vs. the car's bigger kit, etc.
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
Most important is a clotting sponge like the ones made by Quikclot. These stop bleeding very fast and are standard equipment for military medics.
That stuff is excellent!! Our grandson popped his head against a marble table and copped a huge gash that was spurting blood. We poured the powder on it directly and it stopped the bleeding in about 60 seconds flat. It kind of cemented the wash cloth to his head too. They were amazed at the hospital. Took 12 stitches to sew it up.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
It is crazy for anyone to think that a $15 Quikclot bandage is too costly. I value my life a lot more than that. I paid more than that for my Mr Tuffy tire tube protectors.

It is more that there are a lot more things I could bring that are, on, average, more useful for the same number of dollars. I agree the gauzes with clotting agents are useful in medical emergencies but they do have limitations as well and people should be aware of them.
 

retiredNH

Active Member
Region
USA
I got this from a Youtube channel named Skinny Medic:

(2) 5x9 Trauma Dressings
(5) 4x4 Gauze Sponges
(5) Butterfly Bandages
(2) Band aids
(2) Triangle bandages w/ safety pins
(2) Rolls of 3' cling
(6) Alcohol pads
(2) Triple antibiotic ointment
(1) One inch roll cloth tape
(1) EMT scissors
(4) Large non-latex gloves
(1) Aspirin 325 - 2 tablets
(1) Ibuprofen 200mg - 2 tablets
(1) Tylenol 500mg - 2 tablets
(1) Benadryl 25mg
(6) Bite and Sting Pads

(1) C-A-T Tourniquet
(1) 6'' Israeli Bandage Dressing
(1) CPR Shield
(1) Nasopharyngeal Airway (NPA) 28F with Lubricant

I fit it all, in this pack:


A little expensive, but I initially bought it for hiking with my young kid. Has proven useful so far.
Proven useful? How frightening! The best first aid is that which you don't need to do, but of course stuff happens. Hope things turned out well for you and family.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
After my last crash, smash knee bash, I considered having a better safety plan. Not only for me but for anyone I come across. I'm looking at this Med Kit, the Waterproof IFAK 163 Pieces Portable First Aid Kit. For $15, it's not too large at 8.27 x 5.12 x 1.97 inches and a bright visible case. Your thoughts or alternate recommendations?

View attachment 90377
That´s same size & price as my kit. I also carry a suturing rowel & small needle nose pliers, I should
get a hemostat. I strive to limit myself to one or less crashes a year.:rolleyes:
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
That´s same size & price as my kit. I also carry a suturing rowel & small needle nose pliers, I should
get a hemostat. I strive to limit myself to one or less crashes a year.:rolleyes:
Super glue is in every way superior to sutures for emergency repairs in the field. Although the facial expressions of ER nurses when you show them your work are priceless. And if you had an injury serious enough to require sutures you should be going directly to the ER and not passing Go.
 

retiredNH

Active Member
Region
USA
Super glue is in every way superior to sutures for emergency repairs in the field. Although the facial expressions of ER nurses when you show them your work are priceless. And if you had an injury serious enough to require sutures you should be going directly to the ER and not passing Go.
There are medical grade cyanoacrylates. They are often used these days for the final closure of surgical incisions. I've had it used on myself several times. At one time, JnJ sold a version in retail channels, but dropped it years ago, no doubt due to people using it wrong and ending up in the ER. Commercial superglues have manufacturing side products that aren't, shall we say, so great for human tissues. That may account for the eye rolls of ER folks - they have a mess to clean up, and a patient with possibly toxic reactions. And an improperly used hemostat is a good way to damage a vessel and make a surgeon's job even harder.

I would say that for us non-professionals, direct pressure on a wound, to stop bleeding and to avoid wound contamination, is about the best solution. Leave closure to professionals.
 

Rincon

Well-Known Member
After my last crash, smash knee bash, I considered having a better safety plan. Not only for me but for anyone I come across. I'm looking at this Med Kit, the Waterproof IFAK 163 Pieces Portable First Aid Kit. For $15, it's not too large at 8.27 x 5.12 x 1.97 inches and a bright visible case. Your thoughts or alternate recommendations?

View attachment 90377
That’s actually a big item for bike storage, and more than you’ll need for a crash event. I just select the essentials for a single event or two, put them into a ziplock, and slide them into whatever I’m using for storage that day. The first aid baggie is completely flat and goes nearly anywhere. If you have panniers or other large capacity bags and a full battery, then go for the full kit.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Super glue is in every way superior to sutures for emergency repairs in the field. Although the facial expressions of ER nurses when you show them your work are priceless. And if you had an injury serious enough to require sutures you should be going directly to the ER and not passing Go.
Thx, I´ll keep that in mind. I onest all but tore off my little finger & had to ride 6 mi. to the hospital with it
wrapped in a sock. Sat in the ER for 20 minutes while they put a couple stitches in a kid´s knee. The nurse
finally came over & asked what´s the problem. I took off the sock & showed her my finger dangling by
a piece of skin.