Trouble fitting my bbs02 thru bottom bracket of Cannondale trail 6 29er

Jz1276

Member
Yesterday I decided to start my 2ND conversion on this new Cannondale that I had recently purchased. It's super light compared to the bike that I currently have the motor on even though I'm still pushing over 45 miles per hour when pedaling...
Anyway I was able to finally get the bottom bracket cranks out and unlike the first conversion that went super smooth, I thought everything was going to go somewhat okay, but as soon as I started to put the motor through the crank, it got stock halfway thru!
I figured this might happen being that it's a small frame. It will almost definitely go through, but I feel that the bb needs to be bored/tapped.
Has anyone had to deal with this issue? If so, can you please let me know what tools you used to handle the problem? It just needs a minimal amount of space. Please Help!
I will try to post some pictures shortly. As I am currently doing some other stuff in the meantime bc I just received a bunch of carbon parts that I was waiting for and I'm also taking the battery off the frame altogether and rewiring it so it can be placed in my backpack.
Its at least 15 pounds lighter than the current bike that its on, so I'm expecting some nice results.
I also just received and installed the "Leekie Blingring" which so far seems pretty awesome . I was going to wait to install it on the new conversion, but couldn't...
 
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Tara D.

Active Member
Sounds like a fun project! I'm sorry you've run into a problem though. I hope you are able to get some good ideas here. Looking forward to seeing some photos!
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
@flymeaway probably knows the answer in detail. This is what he said on his last conversion.

I looked at the Sunfire, but the hydraulic brakes stopped me. The only integrated levers (hydraulic and electrical signal) I found were Tektro, but for OEM's only. Em3Ev has some conversion kits, but I wasn't blown away. I'd suggest a bike from BD with mechanical disc brakes, unless you will only consider hydraulic. I've had good luck with their 6061 frames, all Motobecane so far. The only issue I had with installation was a tight fit on the Bottom Bracket and I used a 2 1/2" diameter 80 grit flapwheel to "ream" the bore until the BBS02 slipped in. A downtube battery should be fairly easy to find.

Court J.

I plan to do a BBS02 someday, so I file this stuff away. I found flap wheels on Amazon.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Not surprised the difficulty with Cannondale, they like to be "different" and I'm a huge fan of Cannondale. You could ream out the bottom bracket with a variety of tools at home, but depending on how much material needs to be removed it may not turn out very well. This is where bike shop tools come into play: http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/bottom-bracket-standards-1

Or you could call around to LBS in your area to see if they will ream it for a cost you can live with.
 

flymeaway

Well-Known Member
I started to put the motor through the crank, it got stock halfway thru!
I've had that problem on two conversions. I used a 2 1/2" x 1" 80 grit aluminum oxide flapwheel and a Milwaukee electric drill (plug in) and polished the bottom bracket bore until the unit slipped in. Never hit the BBS assembly with a hammer or dead-blow, could damage the bearings. Took about 10 minutes of polishing with the flapwheel to remove enough material to fit.

Court J.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Checked with LBS what reaming a BB on a Cannondale would cost, $25-$40 Max. Small price to pay to do it right on what is likely a $1500-$2000 build.
 

Jz1276

Member
Thanks everyone! I actually remember reading about the flap wheel, so I went out and got one yesterday. I just wanted to be sure.
I've been trying to post pics, but it's keeps saying each file is too big. Its looking pretty sweet so far... I need to take some videos as well. My current ebike boogies! I've been taking corners like I used to on motorcycles. Leaning one knee down.... It feels amazing, it must look pretty sweet! Jason
 
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Jz1276

Member
and
Dremel like tool or sand paper on the cheap. And no fear.

Thanks, that's exactly what I did! I bought a special Dremel stone bit and got to grinding. It only took like 15 minutes. There's was a very small amount that needed to be removed. After that it slid right in.
Then I just continued with everything else. It's all the little things that take the most time... Im trying to get some pics up, but it saying the files are too big. Any advice on getting them on here? Thanks Jason
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Thanks everyone! I actually remember reading about the flap wheel, so I went out and got one yesterday. I just wanted to be sure.
I've been trying to post pics, but it's keeps saying each file is too big. Its looking pretty sweet so far... I need to take some videos as well. My current ebike boogies! I've been taking corners like I used to on motorcycles. Leaning on and knee down.... It feels amazing, it must look pretty sweet! Jason
you're not on motorcycle tires ;)
 

Jz1276

Member
True, but if you check out the Maxxis Hookworms.... The tread pattern is just like that of a motorcycle tire tread pattern! And compared to the tires that were previously on there, you'd understand exactly what I meant.
Most of us are pulling off speeds that we didnt think were possible, so a motorcycle feel is exactly what you're getting. Are you a commuter or trying to push yours to the max? Im always up for some new ideas...
BTW, the Leekie Blingring is well worth the money and has fixed the chain problem. Theres def a lot more power off the line and consistent power.
Im still getting used to the hydraulic brake "magnet setup", but I love the braking power. Talk soon! Time to hit the boardwalk! Jason
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Yep, Hookworms ARE tough bike tires. But it's not about the tread pattern, it's about the TREAD. How thick it is and how it's constructed. And there ain't much there on a bicycle tire relative to a motorcycle. Nor is the tire designed for the heat created at 45mph in neither tread or sidewall construction. motorcycle tires are MUCH less likely (though it happens) to blow out instantly.
A HD inner tube on a motorcycle is almost like a lightweight bike tire. Everything is heavier, thicker, stronger. Built to the TASK.
Bike tires are built for their task also. Which is mostly hauling 200lbs or so at 10-20mph and the power output of maybe 1/2 of a weak E assist?
Then there's potholes and animals. Hit a rabbit on a motorcycle and it pretty much explodes (what a mess) with a little bump. Hit one with your bike and you might be on your ass a second later.
Then there's the brakes? What do you have? not many meant to slow heavy bikes from 40mph. Maybe hydraulic as they do kick some serious ass, oops but then we're back to those wimpy thin tires dealing with SERIOUS heat if you brake hard from speed.....
Just cuz you CAN go 45 doesn't mean you should go 45.... around curves........... road rash hurts like you can't imagine if you've not had it.
As you're grinding your skin off on the pavement at 40 mph, it might occur to you that it doesn't much matter if you were on a motorcycle or a bicycle. ;) And that you sure do slide an amazingly long way.
 
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Jz1276

Member
Sorry for not getting back to you right away things have been a little hectic on my end! I actually did finish my build and it came out pretty good I believe. I do have hydraulic brakes on this bike and it does make a tremendous difference. I have ridden/owned motorcycles, dirtbikes and quads before, so that has definitely helped influence design and certain customizations. Im kind of familiar with the differences between the handling of both and the limitations(which we keep pushing)...
I do agree though, road rash at any speed is not fun!
Yesterday I just finished wiring up my battery so I could hold it in my backpack instead of on the frame. Of course electrical work even minimal is not something that I'm used to, but I guess that's why so many of us are here though asking away!
Anyway, after a little while of messing around with trying to splice plugs and wires to connectors, I finally had to go by the soldering kit.
This was the first time that I've ever soldered anything. It seems to be holding up so far but I need to be able to find connector pieces that fit my battery and I can't seem to find them at Radio Shack or any local hardware stores. Do you know of any places online that I might be able to possibly find a plug that goes into the battery from the motor? The plug is round, has four holes with a slight little groove on the outside so you know which way to put it in. Only two of the holes get used. The ground and power I'm guessing(red and black).
The socket that is it is going into on the battery is round with four prongs. It seems simple enough but of course when you're looking for it can't find it... I didn't buy it locally either I bought it directly from the manufacturer in China so it's not very easy to get ahold of. Their answers are we'll send you whatever you need when you make your next order, lol.
If you have a moment, please advise! Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Jason
 

flymeaway

Well-Known Member
If you have a moment, please advise! Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Jason
If you could post a picture would help.....but a good place to start is www.mcmastercarr.com they have a good selection and diagrams. Yes Red should be positive and Black negative. But you should confirm this with a voltage meter.


Court J.