Tubeless Tire

ramg1967

Member
Hi,

I have been riding this bike for the last 11 months. Yesterday, I had a flat tire. Will be taking the bike to the shop for fix tomorrow.

Just want to know, if anybody here have installed tubeless tire on this bike - if so what is your experience and how much it will cost - average?

Thanks

RL
 

Gordon71

Well-Known Member
Hi,

I have been riding this bike for the last 11 months. Yesterday, I had a flat tire. Will be taking the bike to the shop for fix tomorrow.

Just want to know, if anybody here have installed tubeless tire on this bike - if so what is your experience and how much it will cost - average?

Thanks

RL
Guessing you didn't "slime" your tires. I would add a liner when you get the tube fixed and then slime both tires. Had my first and only flat at 600 miles,did that and no flats since at 1800 miles now.
 
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fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Guessing you didn't "slime" your tires. I would add a liner when you get the tube fixed and then slime both tires. Had my first and only flat at 600 miles,did that and no flats since at 1800 miles now.
sometimes you get flats no matter what. I have marathon plus tires really good flat resistance and I have stands in the tub and still I got a flat 100 miles on the new tire. but I was able to pump it up and it sealed. you just have to be prepared to deal with flats.
 

Johny Rocket

Member
Region
USA
Guessing you didn't "slime" your tires. I would add a liner when you get the tube fixed and then slime both tires. Had my first and only flat at 600 miles,did that and no flats since at 1800 miles now.
Slime or I like Flatout a bit better since it doesn't harden over time, just add a little more once annually. Tannus Armour liners look good too. Going tubeless requires new wheel sets (rims, spokes, tires) all compatible with tubeless set up, IMHO it's not a financially logical thing to do on an existing ebike with hub motor. The ebike spokes & rims are beefed up to handle more torque so finding tubeless is iffy at best
 

ki11a

Well-Known Member
Been getting flats almost every time I go out now, its almost giving me a bit of anxiety now when I am out.

Not sure what else I can do, already tried Tannus Armor with Orange sealant/slime.

Maybe Ill just ride on the sidewalks....
 

Gordon71

Well-Known Member
sometimes you get flats no matter what. I have marathon plus tires really good flat resistance and I have stands in the tub and still I got a flat 100 miles on the new tire. but I was able to pump it up and it sealed. you just have to be prepared to deal with flats.
Very true. I should have added I also carry spare tubes,patch kit,tire and regular tools,CO2,tire pump,wire ties,and a set of handlebar jacks with me at all times.
 

Tars Tarkas

Well-Known Member
Going tubeless doesn't help with flats. To the extent it does, it's because the tires are dosed with sealant. Put sealant in your tubes. Slime is good, but there are other brands. Sealant doesn't stop flats, but it goes a long way in that direction.

Learn to fix a flat yourself -- myths to the contrary, it's not hard.

TT
 

contraktor

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Tahlequah
Been getting flats almost every time I go out now, its almost giving me a bit of anxiety now when I am out.

Not sure what else I can do, already tried Tannus Armor with Orange sealant/slime.

Maybe Ill just ride on the sidewalks....
I have the Slime 2in1 'premium' & if it doesn't work out I'm prepared to try Berryman, as it's said to be more "fibrous", therefore less viscous & supposedly can seal a larger puncture. Personally, I'm not going to shell out $150-$200 for a set of Tannus liners & Mr.Tuffy combo. I'll take my chances experimenting with sealants (if I ever actually get the damn thing from Lectric's slow asses) for now!
 
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ramg1967

Member
Thanks to all the replies.

I will take the bike and get it fixed and will request for SLIME for both the tires during the fix so, I can avoid future flat. I am quite happy the bike stood well for 11 months and first flat. I don't blame the bike or tire or tube or the company. Have to blame myself for not paying attention to the road debris.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
It also depends on the kind of bike. Some bikes are heavy or heavy at one end and get pinch flats. I like the Schwalbe tires that are speed rated and offer high puncture resistance and run them with MrTuffy. I also put the weight, motor and battery low and center. Hub drives get flats frequently. I just repaired one, installing new tires, that was 106 pounds. Lower weight bikes do better in avoiding flats. Tubeless setups can self heal from minor punctures. But the consequences of something more than a minor puncture are catastrophic.
Here is the 106 pound porker. I think I try some Stan's inside a tube.
 

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