Turbo Batteries - 2013 and beyond

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
The odometer reset appears to be a feature of the 691Wh battery. The trip meter is supposed to reset after a recharge, but not the odometer. This bug has been pretty well documented...
 

ROJA

Active Member
I have the smaller battery in my '16 X and my odometer resets (sometimes) also, so it's not just the big battery.
 

Charlie Rohlfing

New Member
As the Specialized Turbo family (not Levo) progresses I have been looking at battery capacity and trying to understand what options might be available if I were to purchase a second battery. Here are the various form compatible Turbo battery specs:

2013 Turbo - 342Wh (9.5Ah)
2015 Turbo - 468Wh (13Ah)
2015 Turbo X- 468Wh (13Ah)
2o15 Turbo S - 504Wh (14Ah) - $800 replacement
2016 Turbo - 468Wh (13Ah)
2016 Turbo X- 562Wh (15.6Ah)- includes bluetooth
2016 Turbo S - 691Wh (19.2Ah) - $999 replacement includes bluetooth

It appears that the 2014/15 Turbo S battery at $800 is now the mail order replacement battery for the base Turbo and any older model (base, X, or S). The is a 0%-47% increase from the older stock batteries. The Turbo SC battery at $999 is the intended mail order replacement for the 2016 Turbo X and Turbo S. This would be a 47.6% - 102% increase over older batteries. Any idea if the 691Wh battery could be used on a 2015/16 base Turbo or any older model?

Doug
Mr. Ruby, I have a question for you about Turbo batteries. I just bought a "new" Turbo Base last week and I'm wondering how fresh the battery might be. That's why I put "new in parentheses ... I think all the Base and Xs are sort of old stock they are trying to clear out, and I'm fine with that, especially at the discounted prices. But I'm wondering if I should worry about an older battery, say one produced in 2015. As you know, the chemistry of Li-ion batteries have a natural decay factor, even when not being used. The Turbo manual even states that they will be down to 75% capacity after two years. Unfortunately I don't have possession of the bike yet or I would be able to read the "Made on" date label on the battery. The bike is actually still at the shop getting the gearing change you recommended! 44 in the front, 11-36 in the back. But I'm wondering ... If I get my bike and find the battery already a year old or older, should I be concerned about premature decline of output? Thanks!
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Mr. Ruby, I have a question for you about Turbo batteries. I just bought a "new" Turbo Base last week and I'm wondering how fresh the battery might be. That's why I put "new in parentheses ... I think all the Base and Xs are sort of old stock they are trying to clear out, and I'm fine with that, especially at the discounted prices. But I'm wondering if I should worry about an older battery, say one produced in 2015. As you know, the chemistry of Li-ion batteries have a natural decay factor, even when not being used. The Turbo manual even states that they will be down to 75% capacity after two years. Unfortunately I don't have possession of the bike yet or I would be able to read the "Made on" date label on the battery. The bike is actually still at the shop getting the gearing change you recommended! 44 in the front, 11-36 in the back. But I'm wondering ... If I get my bike and find the battery already a year old or older, should I be concerned about premature decline of output? Thanks!
I am not enough of an expert in Li-Ion chemistry to give you an answer. Keep in mind it would be a battery that left the factory at around 80% charge and has been unused since manufacture. I do know that the 468 Wh Turbo (2015/16) and Turbo X (2015) may have been manufactured as early as August of 2014. (I think mine was October). I also know that up until my battery started working intermittently, it behaved great. I had over 1000 miles on it and it performed as a new battery should have. The failure, however, was some sort of intermittent where the entire bike would shut down randomly indicating Motor Err on the control panel. A total battery reset (power off and remove from the bike) was required to get back on the road. This can happen if there is a short somewhere in the wiring, but was not a motor error, but a battery failure of some undiagnosed sort. Several folks on this forum have had that same failure with the base Turbo 468 Wh battery.

So in answer to your question....as long as the bike has been properly stored, I don't think the battery will be a problem as far as decay is concerned. It may, however, develop some sort of fault that causes premature failure as described by several here. So far, Specialized has been replacing these on warranty. Make sure you have a good understanding with your dealer about bike and battery warranty.
 
Last edited:

Charlie Rohlfing

New Member
Thank you Douglas. I've really enjoyed all your posts to this forum. Very well thought out and communicated. Let me ask you one more quick question if I may ... I'm a little bit concerned about the Turbo's ability to climb a serious long hill. Where I live in a valley I have to climb up a long steep bike trail to get up to the good riding roads. The trail is 400 foot elevation over 4,000 feet, which makes it a 10% grade. As I mentioned, I'm switching to the 44/36 gears you recommend. Do you think the motor will make this long steep climb without overheating or having trouble? Thanks!
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
I actually am going through this thought process at the moment trying to find a good "deal" on a new bike for a friend. I have access to a manufacturers clearance site and the prices there are very good at around $1000+ off retail, yet I am stuck on this very concept due to my past experience with letting one get too low.

Properly storing a battery with Li chemistry means it should be kept at decent level of charge. They will bleed out as I found with my first duct tape battery pack with a BMS 6 years ago, granted not the best example but cells is cells, by not paying attention to that it the course of one winter (4 months) it bled below the BMS cutoff and became flat and I was unable to get it to recover. I offered up the battery to a guy for free that builds his own packs and he refused it because the cells were too old and he preferred newer ones to start with. I doubt that Specialized or any manufacturer is able to maintain all their older batteries to a constant state of charge as they are all in boxes sitting somewhere.

So cell age is a factor not to mention the advances that they are making year by year in regards to their performance levels. Given that the battery is arguably the most critical component, not to mention the most expensive, on an e bike I would make sure that even a close out deal is allowed coverage under warranty.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Thank you Douglas. I've really enjoyed all your posts to this forum. Very well thought out and communicated. Let me ask you one more quick question if I may ... I'm a little bit concerned about the Turbo's ability to climb a serious long hill. Where I live in a valley I have to climb up a long steep bike trail to get up to the good riding roads. The trail is 400 foot elevation over 4,000 feet, which makes it a 10% grade. As I mentioned, I'm switching to the 44/36 gears you recommend. Do you think the motor will make this long steep climb without overheating or having trouble? Thanks!
Charlie, I have some experience with fairly long (1+ mile) climbs, though probably in the 6-8% range. This where I use the "TURBO" button! Certainly with the lower (44x36) gearing, your legs can do more of the work than with the stock 48x32. I am now riding with a 48x40 low gear and have found that motor temperatures (I can check using the bluetooth interface) have peaked in the 100 - 110F range which is not too hot. In particular, with the 200/250W motors, there is a LOT of surface area for cooling in the GOSwissDrive.

I guess my answer is that I don't think you would have a problem, but I don't have direct experience.

Doug
 

jrlieber

New Member
Wanted to post a bit more after owning bike for 6 months. My wife owns a FELT and I own a 2015 Specialized Turbo (but really is like a Turbo S, accidentally with 691Wh and 250watt motor. Here are my reasons why it's worth seriously considering Specialized:

1) There are MANY electric bikes out there, almost all of them with the central bulky removable battery. These batteries are easily stolen from the bike without damaging the batteries, so users/owners regularly remove the battery and haul them wherever they go. That's a deal breaker for me!! The Specialized built in battery is almost impossible to steal. While it's removable, stealing the battery would likely render it useless, so I haven't perceived this a risk (AND it's also locked on). So when my wife and I take our bikes somewhere, I lock mind up, leaving the battery with the bike, but my wife has to figure how she will lug the battery everywhere.
2) Lights are built in to this bike. No question there are better rechargable lights available, and I have those on my bike also. But when you forget to charge, the Specialized has a backup system built in.
3) I also really like the rear motor, as opposed to the crankset motor - less clunky to me.
So IF looking for an electric bike, IF you find a 2015-2016 Turbo out there, look at the battery size and the motor size. They may have accidentally upgraded the equipment. I bought my $3000 Turbo for sale at $2500, but with the components, it's really a $4000 Turbo-X. I bet there are others out there with the same setup.
At 6 months, I get about 15-20 miles on half a charge, often riding at full turbo in a hurry to get the 7 miles uphill to work. I think I can get about 20-25 of uphill turbo miles. At 70%, probably 30+ miles. (for exercise I'll take my road bike and go 30-50miles; almost NEVER need more than 20 miles in the city of Seattle) I consider this a TAV - Traffic Avoidance Vehicle. NOT for exercise. It allows me to get from point A to point B without needing a shower. We go out to dinner, to the grocery store, etc, without needing to worry about parking or fuel. It's great!!
 

eagamer80

Active Member
Hi @Douglas Ruby , if you want, you could add to your list the SBC-B01 - 11Ah / 396Wh battery that is included in the 2016 Turbo base FLR bikes (same as base Turbo but came with the fenders and luggage carrier). Probably they seel this bikes mainly in Europe, but my bike came with this battery and the SBC-M02 2ooW motor.
 

eagamer80

Active Member
I think this picture says it all for all the electrical components (internal and external) of the Turbo bikes.

specialized_battery_motor_charger_lcd_models.png
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Hi @Douglas Ruby , if you want, you could add to your list the SBC-B01 - 11Ah / 396Wh battery that is included in the 2016 Turbo base FLR bikes (same as base Turbo but came with the fenders and luggage carrier). Probably they seel this bikes mainly in Europe, but my bike came with this battery and the SBC-M02 2ooW motor.
Many thanks! List updated.