Turbo Creo SL Expert Evo/Road Info.

Liisjak

New Member
Region
Europe
Hello,

so I'm in the market for a Creo and my local dealer is offering me 20% off on a 2020 EVO Expert model or 15% off on a 2021 road model, needless to say, I'm torn as to which to choose.
I've heard that the dropper seat post is nothing to write home about, and the gravel pathfinders are quite clunky and heavy. On the 2021 model I'd get the remote on the bar, but is it really worth the price difference?
I haven't been able to demo the bike...so does anyone have any experience on how does it compare to let's say a Diverge? As the limit in my country for E-bikes is 25 km/h and I imagine I'd be going over the limit quite often.

Any kind of info. would be greatly appreciated :D
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I test rode a couple of Creos before the pandemic hit (a basic aluminum model and a carbon SL Expert). At the time one of my two road bikes was a 2016 carbon Diverge. The Creos felt very similar to the Diverge, just a bit heavier. The aluminum Creo felt a bit stiffer in the rear, but the Future Shock really improved the front end ride over my Diverge, which didn't have the FS.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
It really depends on where you ride and which bike is better equipped for that. Don't get suckered in by a few dollars into a bike that does match your type of riding as well.
 

JeffC57

Active Member
On the 2021 model I'd get the remote on the bar, but is it really worth the price difference?
I think the remote buttons are an essential accessory. Without them, it is more difficult to change support level and you probably won't do it as often as you should. You can add the remote buttons to the handlebars on any Creo. In the US they cost about $70 USD. Also some of the the 2021 models have a chain stay which can also be retrofitted on a 2020 Creo. I have a 2020 Creo CC EVO and I had my bike shop install both the remote buttons and the chain stay.
 

Oberst

Well-Known Member
I think the remote buttons are an essential accessory. Without them, it is more difficult to change support level and you probably won't do it as often as you should. You can add the remote buttons to the handlebars on any Creo. In the US they cost about $70 USD. Also some of the the 2021 models have a chain stay which can also be retrofitted on a 2020 Creo. I have a 2020 Creo CC EVO and I had my bike shop install both the remote buttons and the chain stay.
Same here. Would not have bought without the buttons!
 

eddief

Member
I think the only negative about my Creo WAS having to deal with the interface on the top tube. Not terrible, but pretty inconvenient. I installed my own remote buttons and now the bike is perfect. Finding YOUR location for the buttons can be a bit trial and error.
 

Liisjak

New Member
Region
Europe
Thanks a lot guys for the info. A friend of mine is selling a Trek Checkpoint SL 7 2020 for less than half of its original price and I'll test ride it and hopefully, I can find a Creo to demo and compare.
I'd mainly use the motor to get back home as I live on top of a 7km more or less steep climb...which is kind of annoying after a 70-100 km tour.
 

jodi2

Active Member
Not everyone feels the same, I don't need the remote buttons, I prefer the clean look without them. Also you need them less often on a 25km/h limited Creo, where you need to change the levels less often, as you are often riding over the limit/without motor. On those Creos you normally stay in level1 all the time, just in stronger uphills you switch to level2 or 3 once in a while.
But of course the remote buttons are very small and almost invisible and do not really hurt. But they aren't a must have for everyone on a 25km/h Creo, depends on the price.
Tires are always a very personal thing an easy to change.
If you need the dropper post or not, you should know. The one on Comp Carbon Evo and Expert Evo ist still a quite cheap and heavy dropper post.

But I wonder if you are thinking of buying a Creo just because of a good deal? We can't judge how a Creo feels for you, you should try yourself before buying one and also if it fulfills your expectatations and needs and is suited for your height profile. There are almost no other ebikes which ride better/with less resistance without motor or over the 25km/ limit. So it's no problem if you ride often over the limit, you will never feel like someone/something ist braking you down like with other ebike over the speed limit. But you will also not take much advantage of the motor, so if you ride 95% over the limit, you ride 95% an very expensive and heavier bike instead of using simply an lighter and cheaper "organic" bike.
A "normal fit" rider will normally pass the 25km/h if it's flat and won't have much advantage of 25km/h Creo let's say in the Netherlands. But a rider in the alps would make best use of it...
 
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pbd87

New Member
Region
USA
The Creo feels just like a heavy Diverge. I rode them back-to-back several times when deciding what to get. I got the Creo. I've ridden it up mountains, with and without the assist. With assist off, it literally just feels like a Diverge that's 10lbs heavier. But then you press that little button, and it suddenly feels a lot lighter than a Diverge. I would've gotten a Diverge, and spend a large majority of my recreational time in 0 assist or lowest assist (which is really just enough to cancel out the weight penalty on a hill, I think, or just enough to make a headwind disappear). But I got the Creo because I wanted to also use it to commute, and the motor makes the commute SO much faster and more pleasant. On recreational rides, I will also kick the motor into highest assist in a couple of sketchy road sections between my house and the trails, and it's great for that, to get out of harm's way faster.

The Road Remote buttons are mandatory for me, both when riding in traffic and when riding up a dirt trail, mountain, etc. But they're easy to install yourself after, you don't need them installed by the shop. I got a Comp Evo version, and after just a week or 2, I yanked out the dropper and replaced it with a Roval Carbon post (I needed setback and I didn't use the dropper), installed the buttons, and re-wrapped new tape, super easy. Doing it yourself also means you can experiment with where to put the buttons for your own preferences. Mine ended up on the inside of the bar, under the shifters, and I can easily reach them from both the hoods and the drops. I also wrapped the tape over them, so they're 99% invisible, can't tell they're there.
 

jodi2

Active Member
The Creo feels just like a heavy Diverge. I rode them back-to-back several times when deciding what to get. I got the Creo. I've ridden it up mountains, with and without the assist. With assist off, it literally just feels like a Diverge that's 10lbs heavier. But then you press that little button, and it suddenly feels a lot lighter than a Diverge. I would've gotten a Diverge, and spend a large majority of my recreational time in 0 assist or lowest assist (which is really just enough to cancel out the weight penalty on a hill, I think, or just enough to make a headwind disappear).
Motor/motor support does not equal weight difference between bikes or ebikes. If so my 27-28kg Stromer should feel the same with motor support or even "lighter" as my 13kg Creo. And that's definitely not the case. So the Creo never feels as light as a Diverge in handling/agility, but not that far away from the Diverge. And it feels lightyears better than a heavy standard ebike with normal motor/drive...
A little bit more weight or let's say stronger built/stronger frame also sometimes is better. My actual normal gravel bike without motor is a very light one and almost to light/to senible for my actual weight, I feeel better/more stable on the Creo at the moment, even without motor. This is surely different for light riders...
 

pbd87

New Member
Region
USA
Motor/motor support does not equal weight difference between bikes or ebikes. If so my 27-28kg Stromer should feel the same with motor support or even "lighter" as my 13kg Creo. And that's definitely not the case. So the Creo never feels as light as a Diverge in handling/agility, but not that far away from the Diverge. And it feels lightyears better than a heavy standard ebike with normal motor/drive...
A little bit more weight or let's say stronger built/stronger frame also sometimes is better. My actual normal gravel bike without motor is a very light one and almost to light/to senible for my actual weight, I feeel better/more stable on the Creo at the moment, even without motor. This is surely different for light riders...
🙄 I was specifically referring to riding up hills, where a motor can remove a weight penalty. That's all I was saying.

Of course nimbleness and handling isn't affected. It'll still feel 10lbs heavier. But you don't have to muscle those extra 10lbs up hill when you can turn on the assist, I thought that should've been obvious.
 

jodi2

Active Member
🙄 I was specifically referring to riding up hills, where a motor can remove a weight penalty. That's all I was saying.

Of course nimbleness and handling isn't affected. It'll still feel 10lbs heavier. But you don't have to muscle those extra 10lbs up hill when you can turn on the assist, I thought that should've been obvious.
Of course, but this is true for ANY ebike compared to a lighter bike without motor, no matter if the ebike is 10, 20 or 30 lbs heavier. I think the special "position" of new ebikes with assist drive like Creo or Vado SL is worth a precise description, what it's like and what you can expext. Your know for sure (or you wouldn't have bought an expensive Creo) but people who are new to these bikes/to this ebike category may misunderstand "you press that little button, and it suddenly feels a lot lighter than a Diverge".