Turbo Levo Tuning

Mountie111

New Member
Hello I have upgraded my expert in fact it came with the upgrades installed from the factory. I had the 6fattie fsr for two weeks prior to my Expert arriving and it was on the old software. Yes you can easily notice the difference in power profiles between the updated and non updated bikes on the new software the assist just drops off like when you hit the speed limit in the high gears. The old software seemed a bit smarter and intuitive I feel the new software will be easier on the drive train and the battery range has been extended. I do find myself changing between Trail and Turbo assist much more than I ever did before I think I will have to buy the remote so I don't have to keep taking my hands off of the grips.
 

Ruti

New Member
I've just purchased a Turbo Levo FSR and am wondering whats involved in installing a tuning device such as the Sx2 Dongle or PearTune MSO. Does anyone know:
  • What steps are involved to get access to the motor to attach the cables for these devices? I've asked the electricbiketuning guys but haven't had a detailed response.
    • Do i need to remove the pedals and the front cog? If so do i need a spider tool?
    • Do i need to open the motor as well once i have access to it?
  • Which is easiest to install?
An alternate option i have is the badassbox but I can't see how it would be installed on the new Turbo Levo FSR models as the magnet is right in behind the rear disc brakes.

Yes, i realize that i will be voiding the warranty however I really want to get higher speed assist on my bike and they guys over on the Haibike forum (https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/help-deciding-on-which-dongle-to-buy.3534/) who have tuned their bikes absolutely love it.

Any help here would be appreciated.

I will not be allowing the software update to my bike, the current software allows for full motor power from any of the three (eco, trial, and turbo)
The new software lowers the output in each of the three power setting preventing full power unless your in turbo. Anyone who has ridden the bike knows that the power profiles have increasingly less control as the power output increases. If your riding technical trail sections restarting on a slope or worse yet trying to modulate your way through s tricky obstacle is nearly impossible in turbo the power is too hard to control. The mission control app can be adjusted to lower outputs between the three power levels to conserve battery life and I would guess motor life as well. But then there is the drive train issue. I spent $800 to "upgrade" to SRAM EX1 1 x 8 drive train after breaking the same chain twice in two weeks at about 900 miles, I changed the chain but ordered the new drive EX1.

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

The EX1 has a couple of problems, the bike shop had to experiment with shims in order to get it to work, not a problem for me as the consumer. However after about 6 months the upper chain roller in the long cage tore itself out stripping the thread both the cage and retaining screw. I had to buy a new derailleur from England GOOD LUCK finding one state side. I'm going to try to get SRAM to warranty the part but have found my local bike shop claiming trail damage, true there are some scratches on the derailleur, however this is SRAM "tougher" drive system because the stock drive trains are self destructing, stay tuned for more on the warranty adventure.

Badass dongle or power boxes do not increase your power output they only remove the 20mph governor, the easier and safer way is my changing wheel circumference on the mission control app, blue light app is free however I lowered wheel circumference to 2000 mm and got another 4 miles an hours out of the bike, the reality is that on level ground the motor has almost no extra power above 20 miles an hours it just runs out of steam.

ALSO a shout out to the Garmen ALT+ handlebar mount power controller

https://buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/545795

Great device works as promised and very useful switching between eco (set at 30%) and turbo (set at %50) and motor current set at %100 percent. I experimented with the lower power setting that other people were using but when I am trying to mount a rock that failing to clear means falling backwards to earth I am going for the power. This effects my battery life depending on how technical the climbs are in turbo grind my way up and through rock and root hell I will get about 1 mile per indicator green light of charge level, on less demanding level double track about 2 miles per indicator light of charge level.
This is disappointing range but I am asking for a lot of battery in my settings.

Hopes this helps

Ruti
 

Slickchik

New Member
Does this void the warranty? I believe all changes made to the battery and motor are logged somehow and can be seen using diagnostic tools by specialized. I don’t think just resetting to factory settings will hide the fact this was done. I’m having issues with my bike and I did this little hack, rode it around maybe one mile and reverted back to factory settings. Now I’m worried my issues with the bike will not be covered because I did this.
 

Striker

New Member
Has anyone had success with hacking a 2016 turbo S and increasing the limiter past 45km.. The hack for the LEVO does not work on the Turbo S.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Has anyone had success with hacking a 2016 turbo S and increasing the limiter past 45km.. The hack for the LEVO does not work on the Turbo S.

Using the diagnostics or Mission Control, you can adjust the wheel size only down to 2000 mm from the actual of around 2200 mm on a Turbo S using its 700x45c tires. (Note the Specialized Nimbus tires on the Turbo S are a bit larger than the Specialized Electrak on the base Turbo). This might buy you up to 10% in actual assist speed over 45km/h at the expense of the odometer and speedometer reading 10% slow. At best I would expect you could get an assist increase from 28 mph to maybe 30 mph.

I did this on my base Turbo and got the assist up to around 27.5-28 mph from 26.2 mph. I used a separate Garmin and old style bike computer to calibrate against the built in system. Since the base Turbo doesn't really have enough power to drive at the upper reaches of the limits, except on descents or with a tailwind, I tend to err on the side of an accurate speedometer and odometer, and not really bother. Further, I am running 700x35C tires with a smaller diameter of 2150 mm, so the 2000 mm hack doesn't help much.

Net, Net - Since the limit on the Turbo S is already 28 mph (45 kph) and the best case is a 10% net gain, the effect is MUCH smaller than the Turbo Levo hack.
 

Striker

New Member
Hi Striker,

did you get an answer of your quest.

I am interested in that also.

Regards
Dimi


I never got an answer and I dont think the turbo S is hackable. Certainly not in the same way as the LEVO. I believe the speed for the turbo S is in the Firmware on the rear wheel motor. I tried using the Liteblue app with no success. If anyone has a solution, I'd love to hear it.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
I never got an answer and I dont think the turbo S is hackable. Certainly not in the same way as the LEVO. I believe the speed for the turbo S is in the Firmware on the rear wheel motor. I tried using the Liteblue app with no success. If anyone has a solution, I'd love to hear it.
I don't think the speed limit is in the wheel, but in the battery firmware since that is where it gets set by diagnostics (setting 25 km/h vs. 45 km/h). I have a Turbo S battery in my base Turbo and found a bit of difference by setting the wheel diameter smaller at the 2000 mm limit. But it is very minor.
 

Striker

New Member
I don't think the speed limit is in the wheel, but in the battery firmware since that is where it gets set by diagnostics (setting 25 km/h vs. 45 km/h). I have a Turbo S battery in my base Turbo and found a bit of difference by setting the wheel diameter smaller at the 2000 mm limit. But it is very minor.

I did the same as you and all it did was alter the accuracy of my speedometer. I also had a chance to plug my Turbo S into the dealers specialized diagnostic software where I thought I could increase the speed limiter. But that also was futile. Its frustrating as the LEVO is easily hackable and this is not.
 

Giant Dave

New Member
Unfortunately this hack does not work with the 2007 levo turbo comp, you can input the new number but the mission control app ignores it, but you can set it manually to 2000 to give you an extra couple of mph.
 

Giant Dave

New Member
Unfortunately this hack does not work with the 2007 levo turbo comp, you can input the new number but the mission control app ignores it, but you can set it manually to 2000 to give you an extra couple of mph.

Actually it does work, it took about 5 goes before it worked, now it really flies, great hack thanks
 

ScottO

New Member
No. As far as I can tell this has to do with the new Mission Control app. Unlike the older version, the choice of wheel size must be selected from a list that goes no lower than 2000.
 

PaulGee

Member
No. As far as I can tell this has to do with the new Mission Control app. Unlike the older version, the choice of wheel size must be selected from a list that goes no lower than 2000.

Did you notice any increase in mph using 2000? Someone I believe reported a 1-2 mph increase above 20 mph cut off.
 

ScottO

New Member
I did not. My Levo seems to cut out about 17.5 - 18mph. My LBS asked the Specialized rep about it and he said that sounded right. I wish it would power to 20mph but it doesn't sound like that's going to happen.
 

johniboy73

New Member
Does this void the warranty? I believe all changes made to the battery and motor are logged somehow and can be seen using diagnostic tools by specialized. I don’t think just resetting to factory settings will hide the fact this was done. I’m having issues with my bike and I did this little hack, rode it around maybe one mile and reverted back to factory settings. Now I’m worried my issues with the bike will not be covered because I did this.
- Did you get an answer? I'm in UK and it looks like they are limited to 15.5mph of assistance, but the bike is capable and manufactured to be able to work to the US specs of 20mph. I'd want to have the US specs but does it void the Warranty?
 

reoutput

Member
Doing a hack like this is pretty much going to hose you if it is traceable. Is it traceable? I don’t know...If a LBS can’t find any trace of something being done then you should be fine but SBC may be sending new tools to dealers if this hack is causing warranty issues.

As for top speed, I’ve never been able to hold my claimed 28MPH for more than a few seconds, so I do think the actual top speed is a bit less.