Turbo Tero 5.0 motor variations

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
Hi, have had several Class 3 bikes, and are now riding a Turbo Vado 6.
(In Norway)
So, Im used to have some assistance up to 45km/h.
I also had a bike with Bosch Performance Line CX, restricted to 25km/h.
On that powerful motor it took me 5 minutes to change sensor and magnet to eliminate that the motor ever cut of the assistance.
That Bosch powered bike feels as powerful as the Turbo Vado 6, after the sensor adjustment.
I plan to switch the Turbo Vado 6 to a Turbo Tero 5.
The showstopper is that the Turbo Tero 5 is set up to cut motor assist at 25km/h in Europe (Class 1?) and 32km/t in US (Class3)
I believe the Specialized 2.2, 90Nm motor is capable of give some support beond 32km/t, and that it is only a matter of software engine setup.

So, to the question.
(I understand that this is a delicate question, but I plan to continue the liability insurance and behave.)

Are there a simple *) or more advanced **) way to remove or trick the motor assist cut off?????????
(It must be a simple software setting switching between the EU and the US version of Turbo Tero 5.)

I can also be contacted at jp@woldseth.com

*) like on the Bosch motor
**) maintaining functionality as correct speedometer as well as Mission Control functionality.

Thx,

JP Woldseth
 

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Nubnub

Well-Known Member
US Tero is still considered Class 1 (20 mph) limit. The similar Vado is Class 3 (28 mph). You raise an interesting question on what the difference is between the two. I believe if it is software only - it is encrypted and can not be easily defeated. Hardware wise - Peartune offers a plugin hardware solution that has worked with the Tero 5.0:

 

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
US Tero is still considered Class 1 (20 mph) limit. The similar Vado is Class 3 (28 mph). You raise an interesting question on what the difference is between the two. I believe if it is software only - it is encrypted and can not be easily defeated. Hardware wise - Peartune offers a plugin hardware solution that has worked with the Tero 5.0:

Interesting, thx, I will investigate the Peartune plugin.
I assume the motor can provide support above 32km/h, if it's not restricted, like the Bosch and others.
We might find out when the Tero 6 is launched, or are there any other class 3 bikes from Specialized available with the 2.2 motor?
 

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
Como 5.0 and Vado 5.0 are the only two 2.2 motors in class 3 that I'm aware of.
Thx, so it comes down to internal Product Management choices from Specialized that they want to market the Tero 5 as a class 1.
Their choice to restrict the motor to 25/32km/h.
Has anyone tried the "Bosch solution", or is this even possible, were you move the magnet and the sensor to the crankarm fooling the system to believe you ride Slover than you actually do?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
@JP Stromer ST1,
Tero 5.0 is equipped with the motor that is even more powerful than the one in your Vado 6.0. It is of course restricted to 25 km/h to be a "European bike". (Do not please think of the U.S. Classes, as these are not relevant for Norway).

Your Vado 6.0 is currently the only legal 45 km/h L1e-B Specialized e-bike. You can "go to the Dark Side" by derestricting the Tero motor. I do not want to elaborate here on the matter.

You should however consider a certain technical limitation of the Tero: it has been designed as an e-MTB. The drivetrain there is equipped with a smallish chainring that might not be replaceable with a bigger one. If you go to the Dark Side, you will soon discover you'd need to spin the cranks at high cadence to just ride past 30 km/h!
-------------
JP, please consider what I'll write here as a friendly question. I am familiar with Norway: hills, hills, hills, and hills again. A lot of civilization but also even more of the wild Nature. You already own a fast Vado 6 and you seem to have owned a Stromer. Why would you need yet another speed e-bike? You rarely climb hills faster than 25 km/h. The descents are very fast. If you go off-road, 25 km/h is a very high speed. Why would you need to derestrict the Tero? For the urban use? Man, Tero is actually not the most urban e-bike! :) It is mostly for off-road! So: Why do you need to derestrict the Tero?
 

Catch

Member
Region
Europe
Thx, so it comes down to internal Product Management choices from Specialized that they want to market the Tero 5 as a class 1.
Their choice to restrict the motor to 25/32km/h.
Has anyone tried the "Bosch solution", or is this even possible, were you move the magnet and the sensor to the crankarm fooling the system to believe you ride Slover than you actually do?
@JP Stromer ST1,
Tero 5.0 is equipped with the motor that is even more powerful than the one in your Vado 6.0. It is of course restricted to 25 km/h to be a "European bike". (Do not please think of the U.S. Classes, as these are not relevant for Norway).

Your Vado 6.0 is currently the only legal 45 km/h L1e-B Specialized e-bike. You can "go to the Dark Side" by derestricting the Tero motor. I do not want to elaborate here on the matter.

You should however consider a certain technical limitation of the Tero: it has been designed as an e-MTB. The drivetrain there is equipped with a smallish chainring that might not be replaceable with a bigger one. If you go to the Dark Side, you will soon discover you'd need to spin the cranks at high cadence to just ride past 30 km/h!
-------------
JP, please consider what I'll write here as a friendly question. I am familiar with Norway: hills, hills, hills, and hills again. A lot of civilization but also even more of the wild Nature. You already own a fast Vado 6 and you seem to have owned a Stromer. Why would you need yet another speed e-bike? You rarely climb hills faster than 25 km/h. The descents are very fast. If you go off-road, 25 km/h is a very high speed. Why would you need to derestrict the Tero? For the urban use? Man, Tero is actually not the most urban e-bike! :) It is mostly for off-road! So: Why do you need to derestrict the Tero?
It's a huge difference between 25 and 32 km even though the difference sounds small. It's not about hills but on flat tarmac more speed is needed. When I used my Bosch with Speedbox I cruised on the streets at around 30-35 km which for me was perfect so I fully understand ppl who want to "upgraded" ebikes in EU.
I don't want to do it on my Tero 5.0 not due to warranty but because of a accident which can be very expensive because in Norway all ebikes which have been in a accident is automatically checked by authorities.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
It's a huge difference between 25 and 32 km even though the difference sounds small. It's not about hills but on flat tarmac more speed is needed. When I used my Bosch with Speedbox I cruised on the streets at around 30-35 km which for me was perfect so I fully understand ppl who want to "upgraded" ebikes in EU.
I don't want to do it on my Tero 5.0 not due to warranty but because of a accident which can be very expensive because in Norway all ebikes which have been in a accident is automatically checked by authorities.
Do flat sections occur in Norway? :)
 

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
@JP Stromer ST1,
Tero 5.0 is equipped with the motor that is even more powerful than the one in your Vado 6.0. It is of course restricted to 25 km/h to be a "European bike". (Do not please think of the U.S. Classes, as these are not relevant for Norway).

Your Vado 6.0 is currently the only legal 45 km/h L1e-B Specialized e-bike. You can "go to the Dark Side" by derestricting the Tero motor. I do not want to elaborate here on the matter.

You should however consider a certain technical limitation of the Tero: it has been designed as an e-MTB. The drivetrain there is equipped with a smallish chainring that might not be replaceable with a bigger one. If you go to the Dark Side, you will soon discover you'd need to spin the cranks at high cadence to just ride past 30 km/h!
-------------
JP, please consider what I'll write here as a friendly question. I am familiar with Norway: hills, hills, hills, and hills again. A lot of civilization but also even more of the wild Nature. You already own a fast Vado 6 and you seem to have owned a Stromer. Why would you need yet another speed e-bike? You rarely climb hills faster than 25 km/h. The descents are very fast. If you go off-road, 25 km/h is a very high speed. Why would you need to derestrict the Tero? For the urban use? Man, Tero is actually not the most urban e-bike! :) It is mostly for off-road! So: Why do you need to derestrict the Tero?
Thx a lot Stefan, made me think... and I decided not to go for the Tero. To be honest it was most the look of it.
As i live at Solli Plass (city centre) I have actually been looking for a conventional bike, like Specialized Sirrus just to cruise around town.
Tero was ment to replace the Vado. But I guess the Vado will stay as my kind og Bike SUV.
Next e-bike I hope to be one with carbon belt drive, automatic gearing and even more powerful, for commuting purposes.
Thx again
 

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
Do feel a need to update that I comply with current Norwegian/EU regulations on class 3 bikes.
My Turbo Vado 6.0 is registered as a light moped, I have plates (that I do not use) but more important is that I have the mandatory liability insurance.
Even though I prefer riding on the road, the number plate restrict me from riding on cycling roads and more. Only advantage would be that I can ride in tunnels ;)
Se picture, do look funny
 

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coffmandave

Member
Region
USA
Probably the right call for you. I love my Tero, but it's definitely built for gravel/offroad and I honestly find it feels a little boring to ride on paved roads. Perfectly capable, just not that interesting or exciting the way my road bike is.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Do feel a need to update that I comply with current Norwegian/EU regulations on class 3 bikes.
My Turbo Vado 6.0 is registered as a light moped, I have plates (that I do not use) but more important is that I have the mandatory liability insurance.
Even though I prefer riding on the road, the number plate restrict me from riding on cycling roads and more. Only advantage would be that I can ride in tunnels ;)
Se picture, do look funny
You are not alone JP!

1660677899300.png


Bike paths of Poland are mostly slooow! I take a big advantage of riding with traffic as I am at destination must faster than a rider using a bike path could be. There is no match to my 45 km/h Vado on low-traffic roads, too. (As I also own a Vado SL, I use the latter as a regular bike with all consequences).

1660678385936.png

Our friend in Helsinki with his 45 km/h Vado. He commutes daily, a 90 km round trip.
 

gpburdell

Active Member
Region
USA
Thx, so it comes down to internal Product Management choices from Specialized that they want to market the Tero 5 as a class 1.
Their choice to restrict the motor to 25/32km/h.

In the US it seems the general direction is that trails you'd want to ride a Tero on tend to be restricted to a class 1 ebike. While enforcement is scant that could easily change.

There's also the part where the Tero is geared such that you're 90rpm cadence in top gear gets you just above 25mph.
 

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
In the US it seems the general direction is that trails you'd want to ride a Tero on tend to be restricted to a class 1 ebike. While enforcement is scant that could easily change.

There's also the part where the Tero is geared such that you're 90rpm cadence in top gear gets you just above 25mph.
Good insight 👏
 

JP Stromer ST1

New Member
You are not alone JP!

View attachment 132229

Bike paths of Poland are mostly slooow! I take a big advantage of riding with traffic as I am at destination must faster than a rider using a bike path could be. There is no match to my 45 km/h Vado on low-traffic roads, too. (As I also own a Vado SL, I use the latter as a regular bike with all consequences).

View attachment 132230
Our friend in Helsinki with his 45 km/h Vado. He commutes daily, a 90 km round trip.
Thx
 

MacCrackin

Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesota, Central
Do feel a need to update that I comply with current Norwegian/EU regulations on class 3 bikes.
My Turbo Vado 6.0 is registered as a light moped, I have plates (that I do not use) but more important is that I have the mandatory liability insurance.
Even though I prefer riding on the road, the number plate restrict me from riding on cycling roads and more. Only advantage would be that I can ride in tunnels ;)
Se picture, do look funny
With a plate that size, a good breeze probably breaks the speed limit. 😎
 

MacCrackin

Member
Region
USA
City
Minnesota, Central
Speaking of regulations in Scandinavia Zone, I spent a couple winters in Gothenburg Sweden and side hobby was building special bikes for the steep hills and snow & ice conditions which was quite fun.
One regulation noted was all bikes have to have lights any time after dark, get caught was somewhere around $350 dollars or more. I made sure the best lighting option was used. With optional generator if needed.
Does that sound about right? I think it's a good rule regardless, being most of the crime here in the states is done at night, with bikes.
Cheers
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Speaking of regulations in Scandinavia Zone, I spent a couple winters in Gothenburg Sweden and side hobby was building special bikes for the steep hills and snow & ice conditions which was quite fun.
One regulation noted was all bikes have to have lights any time after dark, get caught was somewhere around $350 dollars or more. I made sure the best lighting option was used. With optional generator if needed.
Does that sound about right? I think it's a good rule regardless, being most of the crime here in the states is done at night, with bikes.
Cheers
I'm sure @Catch will respond regarding Norway.
European countries have slightly varying bicycle safety demands but using lights after the dark is mandatory in all of them. How it is enforced or treated seriously depends on a specific country.

Germany is a country with the most restrictive rules. For instance, any regular bike/e-bike has to be equipped with reflective strips on tyres. I do not know whether MTB or road bikes have to conform to that. @jodi2?