Turbo Vado power vs Vado SL power

CodyDog

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Texas Hill Country/Banana Belt, Colorado
In deciding between a Turbo Vado and an SL, I'm trying to figure out how the highest assist level in the SL compares to one of the assist levels with the regular Turbo. With my previous bike (2021 Turbo Levo Comp) I rarely used the Turbo mode. I primarily rode in Level 2 assist. With that being said, would be as simple as assuming Turbo mode on the Vado SL is equal to level 2 (medium level) on a Turbo Vado?

Thanks.
 

Nubnub

Active Member
You could probably adjust the default settings to act exactly that way. Not sure what the defaults are for the Vado - but if it is 35/35 for Eco. I'd say that is a little less than the SL turbo. Sport mode default is probably more than the SL turbo. For comparison - I have a Tero with settings of 20/100, 40/100 and 100/100. Eco approximately gives mechanical assist = to my rider power while Sport gives approx double. So on steep hills (10-15%), I can climb in Eco but it requires >200 W of power from me. Sport halves that and is much easier - much easier than my SL in turbo mode on the same hill. And Turbo feels like it is pulling me up the hill and I am only pedaling to keep the assist on.
 

CodyDog

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Texas Hill Country/Banana Belt, Colorado
You could probably adjust the default settings to act exactly that way. Not sure what the defaults are for the Vado - but if it is 35/35 for Eco. I'd say that is a little less than the SL turbo. Sport mode default is probably more than the SL turbo. For comparison - I have a Tero with settings of 20/100, 40/100 and 100/100. Eco approximately gives mechanical assist = to my rider power while Sport gives approx double. So on steep hills (10-15%), I can climb in Eco but it requires >200 W of power from me. Sport halves that and is much easier - much easier than my SL in turbo mode on the same hill. And Turbo feels like it is pulling me up the hill and I am only pedaling to keep the assist on.
Thanks for the reply. How are you liking your Tero? Pro's and con's?That is one of the bikes I will be testing.
 
Last edited:

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
After watching this video, I've concluded that one must have both! Because every day is different, and each day might require a different ride! o_O

Mike...
That was always the problem with having too many (if there is such a thing) cross-country skis. Decisions, decisions.

I went with the Creo, but the heaviest Creo because I needed light weight. Yes, there are times more power would be really nice but then the bike would have been stolen by now since I would have failed getting it up my stairs.
 

Nubnub

Active Member
Thanks for the reply. How are you liking your Tero? Pro's and con's?That is one of the bikes I will be testing.
I'm liking the bike. Was looking for something for off road that was better than the Vado SL. I had a Levo SL but found I didn't need the full suspension for the types of off road I do. I would have gotten the Tero instead of the Levo if it had been available or even announced. I've done green and blue trails on all the bikes and the lower powered SL's could be a challenge on some of the steepest grades with cadence crunching rocks or ruts that need steering around. The Tero handles those easily both because of the extra power assist as well as the bigger tires (bigger than the Vado SL anyway). Most of the time the greater power of the Tero is not needed, but it is good to have it as a bailout -particularly when trying new trails.

Downsides are the pedals and grips which I've replaced. Also added a kickstand :). I also have swapped in S-works 42 mm Pathfinders for the days I know I will only be on pavement - probably > 20+% increase in range over the stock Ground Controls. Bigger downsides are the weight and the Class 1 limitation including the 36 tooth chainring. The other downside is I think the 29er fork is too long for the bike. I've ridden a Vado 2022 with it's shorter 80mm travel and 650B wheels - and I liked the handling better. The Pathfinders are about the same diameter as the Vado's 650B 2.3 in Pathfinders and I prefer the Vado's handling.

I may or may not Peartune and change out for a larger chainring. Gonna wait til my "free" checkup/adjustments are done by Specialized in any case. I'm also researching swapping the fork for one designed for a 27.5 bike. In any case could always go with the one on the Vado - should be good with the pathfinders but unsure how it may affect the original Ground Controls. One good thing about 700C is that there are a lot of different gravel tires available and the Tero can fit them - something my Vado SL with fenders can't do.
 

CodyDog

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Texas Hill Country/Banana Belt, Colorado
I'm liking the bike. Was looking for something for off road that was better than the Vado SL. I had a Levo SL but found I didn't need the full suspension for the types of off road I do. I would have gotten the Tero instead of the Levo if it had been available or even announced. I've done green and blue trails on all the bikes and the lower powered SL's could be a challenge on some of the steepest grades with cadence crunching rocks or ruts that need steering around. The Tero handles those easily both because of the extra power assist as well as the bigger tires (bigger than the Vado SL anyway). Most of the time the greater power of the Tero is not needed, but it is good to have it as a bailout -particularly when trying new trails.

Downsides are the pedals and grips which I've replaced. Also added a kickstand :). I also have swapped in S-works 42 mm Pathfinders for the days I know I will only be on pavement - probably > 20+% increase in range over the stock Ground Controls. Bigger downsides are the weight and the Class 1 limitation including the 36 tooth chainring. The other downside is I think the 29er fork is too long for the bike. I've ridden a Vado 2022 with it's shorter 80mm travel and 650B wheels - and I liked the handling better. The Pathfinders are about the same diameter as the Vado's 650B 2.3 in Pathfinders and I prefer the Vado's handling.

I may or may not Peartune and change out for a larger chainring. Gonna wait til my "free" checkup/adjustments are done by Specialized in any case. I'm also researching swapping the fork for one designed for a 27.5 bike. In any case could always go with the one on the Vado - should be good with the pathfinders but unsure how it may affect the original Ground Controls. One good thing about 700C is that there are a lot of different gravel tires available and the Tero can fit them - something my Vado SL with fenders can't do.
Nubnub: Thanks for the reply.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Isn’t that approx. 105%?
he's referring to the two numbers that specialized uses in their custom power settings - the first is the percentage of the bikes "multiplication factor" that you're gettting, the second is the cap / maximum percentage of the motor's total power. so it's not 45 divided by 43, but rather 45 percent of the multiplication factor (e.g. if the factor was 10, the bike would give you an extra 4.5 times your pedaling power) up to a max of 43 percent of the total power available.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Isn’t that approx. 105%?
he's referring to the two numbers that specialized uses in their custom power settings - the first is the percentage of the bikes "multiplication factor" that you're gettting, the second is the cap / maximum percentage of the motor's total power. so it's not 45 divided by 43, but rather 45 percent of the multiplication factor (e.g. if the factor was 10, the bike would give you an extra 4.5 times your pedaling power) up to a max of 43 percent of the total power available.
It is correct what @mschwett said:
  • The leg power amplification (boost factor) of Vado SL is 1.8x while it is 4x for the latest Vado 5.0. Meaning a rider who inputs 100 W with their legs will force the SL 1.1 motor producing 180 W of mechanical assistance while the same 100 W of pedalling power will squeeze 400 W of mechanical power from the 2.2 motor at 100% of Support.
  • The maximum mechanical power the SL 1.1 motor can produce is 240 W while it is 560 W with the 2.2 drive unit.
All the figures refer to 100/100% Turbo assistance setting for both e-bikes.
 

Rider51

Member
Region
USA
It is correct what @mschwett said
...

Let's just not lose sight of the fact that the SL weighs just over 30lbs, while the Vado is over 50. That definitely factors in.

I like practical terms, much more than just numbers. Bear with me if I bore you!

The Vado has a lot of power. Noticeably more power than an SL. More power than most people need, unless you live in a really hilly area, and you're just looking to ride, get places, not have a fitness e-bike. Very good for older commuters for example. Then, turbo mode on a Vado is your friend. It really is wonderful in these kinds of areas. Eco on the flats, and something between Sport and Turbo on the hills.

But someone reasonably fit willing to put some of their own watts into an SL will find on most flats and rolling hills, the SL can absolutely fly in Turbo mode. I'm nearly 60 years old, am fairly fit, and can get my SL going plenty fast, often over 20mph on flats without sweating a great deal in Turbo. If I'm really working, on the flats I can zoom along close to 25mph in Turbo. I can't imagine anyone needing much more than this! It climbs okay too, just slower than a Vado, no doubt. But most people don't ride 100% of the time in Turbo on an SL. Only if you were in a hurry. I find myself in all modes, with Turbo when I want to really glide, or on hills, that's it.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
...

Let's just not lose sight of the fact that the SL weighs just over 30lbs, while the Vado is over 50. That definitely factors in.

I like practical terms, much more than just numbers. Bear with me if I bore you!

The Vado has a lot of power. Noticeably more power than an SL. More power than most people need, unless you live in a really hilly area, and you're just looking to ride, get places, not have a fitness e-bike. Very good for older commuters for example. Then, turbo mode on a Vado is your friend. It really is wonderful in these kinds of areas. Eco on the flats, and something between Sport and Turbo on the hills.

But someone reasonably fit willing to put some of their own watts into an SL will find on most flats and rolling hills, the SL can absolutely fly in Turbo mode. I'm nearly 60 years old, am fairly fit, and can get my SL going plenty fast, often over 20mph on flats without sweating a great deal in Turbo. If I'm really working, on the flats I can zoom along close to 25mph in Turbo. I can't imagine anyone needing much more than this! It climbs okay too, just slower than a Vado, no doubt. But most people don't ride 100% of the time in Turbo on an SL. Only if you were in a hurry. I find myself in all modes, with Turbo when I want to really glide, or on hills, that's it.
Your opinion is correct for healthy riders who would do with a traditional bike, and only need assistance upwind, uphill or want to ride faster (the Class 3 version). I appreciate the low weight of the SL on the mixed terrain rides (pavement, gravel, easy off-road). However, we are not equal. As I love my Vado SL and ride it on a daily basis (and I have had a couple of Metric Centuries on it), an ailing rider as I am needs the power of the big Vado for heavy duty rides.

For instance, it is unlikely I could do the Imperial Century on a Vado SL (even if I own three Range Extenders). It is simply impossible for me to ride Vado SL in real mountains: I need the 38-46T and Turbo of my Highway Star (Vado 5.0) there. On the other hand, the big Vado is not fit for, say, forest rides as its heavy weight and design disallow fast riding there, and carrying the heavy e-bike over any obstacle is painful. Not that I didn't ride my big Vado in forests: It is simply not good for it.

The 35/35% assistance of my powerful Vado translates to 70/70% SL assistance. The powerful 50/50% Vado support means 100% SL Turbo. Go to 60/60% on Vado 5.0 and the SL is left in the dust... For my legs.